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Poetry Presentations Take notes on the following requirements of your presentations. Ask any questions that come to mind, so that you are clear about this.

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Presentation on theme: "Poetry Presentations Take notes on the following requirements of your presentations. Ask any questions that come to mind, so that you are clear about this."— Presentation transcript:

1 Poetry Presentations Take notes on the following requirements of your presentations. Ask any questions that come to mind, so that you are clear about this assignment. Remember creativity is good, but not at the cost of comprehension. Keep slides simple. Use MLA format to cite material and create a works cited page.

2 Project requirements: 5 minute presentation5 minute presentation All research/quotations cited in correct MLA formatAll research/quotations cited in correct MLA format Professional presentationProfessional presentation Pick one poem in our literature book (that we have not studied)Pick one poem in our literature book (that we have not studied) Create a Powerpoint that helps you to teach the poem to the class You will be demonstrating your analysis, research, and presentation skills Meet all requirements on the rubricMeet all requirements on the rubric 200 pts200 pts

3 Daddy By Sylvia Plath Kara Ellis English 12 5/11/2012

4 Author slide : (picture, biographical info, authors genre, etc) Poet and novelist. Among many poems, she produced only novel, The Bell Jar. It was published after her death in Married to Ted Hughes (an English poet) A Confessional Poet who put the speaker herself at the center of her poems in such a way as to make her psychological vulnerability and shame an embodiment of her civilization (Uroff 1). –P–Plath is known for using her own life in her poetry as a way to amplify a poems feelings or come to some sort of self revelation.

5 2 nd Author slide: Plaths father died when she was 8 years old. She has written more than one poem about her father. The other famous one is called The Colossus and talks about her father as a god. Plaths poem Daddy is about her feelings towards her father and her feelings about her life after his death. She wrote this poem as her marriage to Ted was crumbling and her feelings of depression were consuming her.

6 Other Works The Bell Jar – novel published after her death. Details the mental breakdown of a young woman. Semi-autobiographical. Ariel – Plaths final collection of poetry. This book has the poem Daddy in it. Crossing the Water The Colossus

7 Literary Time Period What was going on in literature at the time that my poem was written? –Who were the big names? –What where the predominant genres of literature?

8 Time Period How does my poem fit with the time period it was written in? (3 bullet points at least)

9 Timeline

10 Daddy You do not do, you do not do Any more, black shoe In which I have lived like a foot In which I have lived like a foot For thirty years, poor and white, For thirty years, poor and white, Barely daring to breathe or Achoo. Daddy, I have had to kill you. Daddy, I have had to kill you. You died before I had time Marble-heavy, a bag full of God, Ghastly statue with one gray toe Big as a Frisco seal And a head in the freakish Atlantic Where it pours bean green over blue In the waters off beautiful Nauset. I used to pray to recover you. Ach, du. In the German tongue, in the Polish town Scraped flat by the roller Of wars, wars, wars. But the name of the town is common. My Polack friend So I never could tell where you Put your foot, your root, I never could talk to you. I never could talk to you. The tongue stuck in my jaw It stuck in a barb wire snare. Ich, ich, ich, ich, Ich, ich, ich, ich, I could hardly speak. I thought every German was you I thought every German was you And the language obscene. The snows of the Tyrol, the clear beer of Vienna Are not very pure or true. With my gipsy ancestress and my weird luck And my Taroc pack and my Taroc pack I may be a bit of a Jew. I have always been scared of you, With your Luftwaffe, your gobbledygoo. And your neat mustache And your Aryan eye, bright blue. Panzer-man, panzer-man, O You Not God but a swastika So black no sky could squeak through. Every woman adores a Fascist, The boot in the face, the brute Brute heart of a brute like you.

11 You stand at the blackboard, daddy, In the picture I have of you, A cleft in your chin instead of your foot But no less a devil for that, no not Any less the black man who Bit my pretty red heart in two. I was ten when they buried you. At twenty I tried to die At twenty I tried to die And get back, back, back to you. I thought even the bones would do. But they pulled me out of the sack And they stuck me together with glue. And then I knew what to do. I made a model of you, A man in black with a Meinkampf look And a love of the rack and the screw. And I said I do, I do. So daddy, I'm finally through. The black telephone's off at the root, The voices just can't worm through. If I've killed one man, I've killed two– The vampire who said he was you And drank my blood for a year, Seven years, if you want to know. Daddy, you can lie back now. There's a stake in your fat black heart And the villagers never liked you. They are dancing and stamping on you. They always knew it was you. Daddy, daddy, you bastard, I'm through.

12 Daddy You do not do, you do not do Any more, black shoe In which I have lived like a foot For thirty years, poor and white, Barely daring to breathe or Achoo. Daddy, I have had to kill you. You died before I had time Marble-heavy, a bag full of God, Ghastly statue with one gray toe Big as a Frisco seal And a head in the freakish Atlantic Where it pours bean green over blue In the waters off beautiful Nauset. I used to pray to recover you. Ach, du. In the German tongue, in the Polish town Scraped flat by the roller Of wars, wars, wars. But the name of the town is common. My Polack friend So I never could tell where you Put your foot, your root, I never could talk to you. I never could talk to you. The tongue stuck in my jaw It stuck in a barb wire snare. Ich, ich, ich, ich, Ich, ich, ich, ich, I could hardly speak. I thought every German was you I thought every German was you And the language obscene. The snows of the Tyrol, the clear beer of Vienna Are not very pure or true. With my gipsy ancestress and my weird luck And my Taroc pack and my Taroc pack I may be a bit of a Jew. I have always been scared of you, With your Luftwaffe, your gobbledygoo. And your neat mustache And your Aryan eye, bright blue. Panzer-man, panzer-man, O You Not God but a swastika So black no sky could squeak through. Every woman adores a Fascist, The boot in the face, the brute Brute heart of a brute like you.

13 You stand at the blackboard, daddy, In the picture I have of you, A cleft in your chin instead of your foot But no less a devil for that, no not Any less the black man who Bit my pretty red heart in two. I was ten when they buried you. At twenty I tried to die At twenty I tried to die And get back, back, back to you. I thought even the bones would do. But they pulled me out of the sack And they stuck me together with glue. And then I knew what to do. I made a model of you, A man in black with a Meinkampf look And a love of the rack and the screw. And I said I do, I do. So daddy, I'm finally through. The black telephone's off at the root, The voices just can't worm through. Rather than simply having a rhyme scheme throughout the poem, Plath uses assonance to create a specific rhythm that runs through the whole poem. This style is more characteristic of modern poetry rather than Romantic or Victorian poetry. Assonance = the repetition of vowels sounds. End Rhyme= a word agreeing with another in terminal sound. Internal Rhyme = rhyme occurring within a line of poetry She uses both end rhyme and internal rhyme to push this nursery rhyme rhythm. It forces the reader to pause at the end of each line and creates that rocking motion, which can then create a eerie atmosphere. If I've killed one man, I've killed two– The vampire who said he was you And drank my blood for a year, Seven years, if you want to know. Daddy, you can lie back now. There's a stake in your fat black heart And the villagers never liked you. They are dancing and stamping on you. They always knew it was you. Daddy, daddy, you bastard, I'm through.

14 Symbolism Plaths poem is really about her feelings towards her father. He died when she was young and she is angry with him for dying. The main symbol in the poem is the image of a Nazi and a Jew. She compares her father to a Nazi to emphasize how she is the victim (Jew) and he is the one who has caused her suffering (Nazi). An engine, an engine Chuffing me off like a Jew. A Jew to Dachau, Auschwitz, Belsen. I began to talk like a Jew. I think I may well be a Jew. I have always been scared of you With your Luftwaffe, your gobbledygoo. And your neat mustache And your Aryan eye, bright blue. Panser-man, panzer-man, O You

15 metaphor: a direct comparison of two unlike things metaphor: a direct comparison of two unlike things –Daddy, I have had to kill you / You died before I had time (6-7) –She didnt really kill her father. This metaphor means that she wants to get him out of her head. Internal Conflict: a struggle that takes place within the mind of a character. –I never could talk to you. (24) ; At twenty I tried to die / And get back, back, back to you. / I thought even the bones would do. (58-60) –She hates her father for the pain he caused her, but she misses him. She wants a relationship/connection with him, but she cannot have it because he died too soon. Allusion: reference to a well known person, event, or place from history, art, or another literary work. –Marble-heavy, a bag full of God, / Ghastly statue with one gray toe (8-9) ; A man in black with a Meinkamp look (65) –Plaths first poem about her father was called The Colossus and compared her father to a statue of a god -The Colossus at Rhodes –Meinkamp was Hitlers book. She is saying that the man she married (Ted Huges) had the same looks as her father (Nazi). Other literary devices

16 Ted Hughes and Sylvia Plath The Colossus at Rhodes Aurelia, Otto, and Sylvia Plath

17 Works Cited Page (see OWL at Purdue) Authors last name, First name. Title of Book. Place of Publication: Publisher, Year of Publication. Type of Source. Plath, Sylvia. Daddy. The Collected Poems: Sylvia Plath. Ed. Ted Hughes. New York: Harper Perennial, Print. Ramazani, Jahan. "'Daddy, I Have had to Kill You:' Plath, Rage, and the Modern Elegy." PMLA (Oct. 1993): Rpt. in Poetry Criticism. Ed. Elisabeth Gellert. Vol. 37. Detroit: Gale Group, Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 26 Apr Uroff, M. D. "Sylvia Plath and Confessional Poetry: A Reconsideration." Iowa Review 8.1 (1977): Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism. Ed. Jeffrey W. Hunter and Deborah A. Schmitt. Vol Detroit: Gale Group, Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 26 Apr Name of Site. Date of Posting/Revision. Name of organization affiliated with the site (sometimes found in copyright statements). Type of Source. Date you accessed the site. The Purdue OWL. 26 March Purdue University Online Writing Lab. Web. 27 March 2009.


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