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21 st Century Community Learning Center Program May 11, 2010 Spring 2010 Video Conference McKinley Community School for Adults.

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Presentation on theme: "21 st Century Community Learning Center Program May 11, 2010 Spring 2010 Video Conference McKinley Community School for Adults."— Presentation transcript:

1 21 st Century Community Learning Center Program May 11, 2010 Spring 2010 Video Conference McKinley Community School for Adults

2 Welcome and Introduction; Housekeeping By Daniel Williams Special Programs Management Section

3 Purpose To share with the sites the updates to the 21 st CCLC program both at the federal and state levels To share with the sites what is required to input into PPICS To share the revised reports for State Evaluation To answer/gather questions that sites may have concerning 21 st CCLC grant

4 Agenda Welcome and IntroDan Overview of 21 st CCLC EvaluationDan Grant and Program Updates and Timeline Temporary Contract Employees Personnel Issues/questions Payroll Certifications Procurement questions Equipment and Real Property Management OMB A-87 Supplement not Supplant Travel Summer School fees PPICS submission and State evaluation Dan Questions and AnswersAll Next StepsAll

5 Federal Context Every state has an Accountability System (AYP) Every state has State Standards (HSA and HCPS III) U.S. Department of Education partners with every state to assure that all children have the opportunity to achieve State Standards (NCLB) Under NCLB as Title IV

6 21 st CCLC Program Plays an important role in helping students learn Targeted to students most at-risk and in need of support to achieve State Standards Can also be known as Extended Learning Opportunities Community learning centers must offer services during non-school hours or periods when school is not in session

7 Focus of the Program Tutoring in the areas of Reading and Math Remediation Enrichment Family Engagement

8 Focus of the Program Each eligible organization that receives an award may use the funds to carry out a broad array of before- and after-school activities (or activities during other times when school is not in session) that advance student achievement. o Remedial education activities and academic enrichment learning programs, including providing additional assistance to students to allow the students to improve their academic achievement; o Mathematics and science education activities; o Arts and music education activities; o Entrepreneurial education programs; o Tutoring services (including those provided by senior citizen volunteers) and mentoring programs; o Programs that provide after-school activities for limited English proficient students that emphasize language skills and academic achievement; o Recreational activities; o Telecommunications and technology education programs; o Expanded library service hours; o Programs that promote parental involvement and family literacy; o Programs that provide assistance to students who have been truant, suspended, or expelled, to allow the students to improve their academic achievement; and o Drug and violence prevention programs, counseling programs, and character education programs.

9 Overview of 21 st CCLC Evaluation H-5: What are the State evaluation requirements? States must conduct a comprehensive evaluation (directly, or through a grant or contract) of the effectiveness of programs and activities provided with 21st CCLC funds. In their applications to the Department, States are required to describe the performance indicators and performance measures they will use to evaluate local programs. States must also monitor the periodic evaluations of local programs and must disseminate the results of these evaluations to the public.

10 Overview of 21 st CCLC Evaluation H-6: What are the evaluation requirements for local grantees? Each grantee must undergo a periodic evaluation to assess its progress toward achieving its goal of providing high-quality opportunities for academic enrichment. The evaluation must be based on the factors included in the principles of effectiveness. The results of the evaluation must be: (1) used to refine, improve, and strengthen the program and to refine the performance measures; and (2) made available to the public upon request. Local grantees, working with their SEAs, must evaluate the academic progress of children participating in the 21st CCLC program.

11 Evaluation Process Congress USDOE Hawaii DOE Learning Points; PPICS PREL Cohort 1 Cohort 2 Cohort 3 Cohort 4 Cohort 5 Cohort 6 Local Evaluation Report APR and Grantee Profile GPRA Indicators USDOE Indicators State Indicators Individual Grant Indicators State Evaluation Report

12 21 st CCLC Current Cohorts Cohort 3 ( to ) ENC to Hana, Kekaulike, Waialua and Waipahu Cohort 4 ( to ) Castle and Kealakehe Cohort 5 ( to ) Leilehua, Central Kauai, Molokai and Farrington Cohort 6 ( to ) Baldwin, Campbell, Kaimuki, Kohala and McKinley

13 Learning Points Associates; PPICS and APR PPICS Website is now open – every site should have received an from PPICS with user name and passworduser name and password Cohort 4 and 5 are to revise their Grantee Profile and input their APR into PPICS. Cohort 6 needs to input Grantee Profile Cohort 3 does not need to input anything into PPICS Reporting period for cohort 4 and 5 – Summer Term 2009 and school year Reporting period for cohort 6 – school year Deadline to have APR into PPICS is November 5, 2010 All grantees has a designee whose name was given to Learning Points Assoc who created a password to enter the system. Web site: For technical assistance and troubleshooting for PPICS, please contact: 21st CCLC Technical Assistance Toll-free: (866)

14 Purpose of PPICS and APR The purpose of the Grantee Profile module is to collect basic information about your grantees, the proposed objectives and community partners associated with a given project, the activities grantees propose to deliver at each of their centers, and the students and family members they intend to serve. The purposes of the APR are (1) to collect data from 21 st CCLC grantees on progress made during the preceding year in meeting their project objectives; (2) to collect data on what elements characterized center operation during the reporting period, including the student and adults populations served; and (3) to collect data that addresses the GPRA performance indicators for the 21 st CCLC program.

15 Reporting Requirements for PPICS APR Decisions Made by Hawaii for 2009 – 10 Data Inputting Activities Approach: Report Individual APR Activity Information Mandatory Impact Categories: Grades, Learning Point Associates Teacher SurveyLearning Point Associates Teacher Survey Optional Impact Categories: None

16 Reporting Requirements for PPICS APR Decisions Made by Hawaii for 2009–10 – Data Inputting Reporting APR Objectives Data: Yes Reporting by Attendance Gradations: No Regular Attendee Data Submission: NO, I do not want my grantees to report regular attendee-level data Data Collection Approach: APR Data entry tasks will be delegated to individual grantees

17 Program Questions for Hawaii Local Evaluation Report To evaluate implementation, the suggested outline included the following list of implementation questions for sites to address in order to obtain an understanding of program implementation. Narrative to be sent to Dan with evidence attached. Front Cover (1 page) The front cover should provide the following information: Title of the program and its location Name of the evaluator(s) Period covered by the report Date the report is submitted

18 Executive Summary (no more than 4 pages) This section of the report is a brief overview of the evaluation, explaining why it was conducted and listing its major conclusions and recommendations. Although the summary is placed first, it is the section that you write last. Typical content: What was evaluated? Why was the evaluation conducted? What are the major findings and recommendations that you conclude from the evaluation? Has the program been implemented as planned in the grant application? If no, what changes were made and why? What challenges have been faced in implementing the program and how are these challenges being addressed? Which community-based partnerships, as planned in the grant application, have been established and maintained and which ones have not? Why? Are program activities interesting and valuable to students, teachers, administrators, and community partners? What are the plans to ensure effective program implementation next year? Please add a page to your report that list the partners for each center that your grant serves for SY

19 Additional Info to Conclusion and Recommendations It may be more compelling to present this section in the form of a list rather than as a narrative. The recommendations or options can be the most influential part of the evaluation report. Be sure, therefore, to emphasize what is important, and to make clear which conclusions have been tentatively rather than firmly drawn. Many times the only part of an evaluation report that is read is the section dealing with recommendations and options. For this reason, you should prepare the section very carefully. Recommendations generally suggest a single course of action armed at remedying weaknesses in the program and perpetuating strengths. You may prefer to provide the users with options for alternative courses of action. Each option is supported by major findings and data from the evaluation. Recommendations should follow logically from judgments made about the evaluation data. Your suggestions should be directed toward specific aspects of the program or to specific actions.

20 Additional Info to Conclusion and Recommendations Typical content: Conclusions What are the major conclusions to be drawn about the effectiveness of the program as a whole? Of its various components? How firm are these conclusions? Recommendations regarding the program On the basis of specific data, what recommendations can you suggest concerning the program?

21 Timeline for this years Report Friday, October 22 nd End of year local evaluation report due - Send electronic reports to Dan Friday, November 5 th Last day to enter data into PPICS for Hawaii - Dan needs to have data entered so that he can validate it for feds and PREL reporting

22 State Reporting – PREL Implementation – State profile of 21CCLC programming Operations, Activities, Participants PREL reports by complex and aggregates State totals Program Measures – Did the Complexes/State meet performance targets? Outcomes are a combination of federally mandated GPRAs and HI DOE- established PREL reports by complex and aggregates State totals Data Sources – PPICS, Local Evaluation Reports, HIDOE Chuck Giuli and Andrew Sahalie Pacific Resources for Education and Learning (PREL) Telephone: Fax:

23 Program Measures Objective 1. Participants will demonstrate educational and social benefits and exhibit positive behavioral changes. Outcome Indicator Performance Measure Percentage of students whose… Target 1.1 Academic Achievement Students regularly participating in the program will show continuous improvement in achievement through measures such as test scores, grades, and/or teacher reports 1.1a Mathematics grades increase from fall to spring. 47% 1.1b Reading grades increase from fall to spring. 47% Determined by report of increase in grades PPICS

24 Reporting Grades Use the following guidelines which were adapted from the states guidelines for Priority Ranking. Elementary standards- based report card schools will use the following reading and math strands: For Language Arts: Reading and Literature proficiency grade is to be used. For Mathematics: The lowest proficiency grade in any of the 5 mathematic strand is to be used. Letter Grades A, ME, E, E+, E- B, MP, M, S+ C, S D, S-, N, N-, N+ F, U

25 Program Measures Objective 1. Participants will demonstrate educational and social benefits and exhibit positive behavioral changes. Outcome Indicator Performance Measure Percentage of teacher-reported improvement in… Target 1.2 Behavior Changes Students participating in the program will show improvements on measures such as school attendance, classroom performance, and decreased disciplinary actions or other adverse behaviors. 1.2a Turning in homework on time.70% 1.2b Classroom participation.70% 1.2c Attending class regularly.70% 1.2d Student classroom behavior.70% Determined by national teacher survey results PPICS

26 Program Measures Objective 2: 21st CCLCs will offer a range of high quality educational, developmental, and recreational services. Outcome Indicator Performance Measure Percentage of centers offer… Target 2.1Core educational services Centers will offer high-quality services in at least one core academic area, such as reading and literacy, mathematics, and science 2.1 High-quality services in at least one core academic area, such as reading and literacy, mathematics, and science 100% 2.2 Enrichment and support activities Centers will offer enrichment and support activities such as nutrition and health, art, music, technology, and recreation. 2.2a Enrichment and support activities in technology. 85% 2.2b Enrichment and support activities in other areas. 100% Determined by report of activity subjects PPICS

27 Program Measures Objective 2: 21st CCLCs will offer a range of high quality educational, developmental, and recreational services. Outcome Indicator Performance Measure Percentage of centers… Target 2.3 Community involvement Establish and maintain partnerships within the community that continue to increase levels of community collaboration in planning, implementing, and sustaining programs. 2.3 Establish and maintain partnerships. 85% 2.4 Services to parents and other adults Offer services to parents, senior citizens, and other adult community members. 2.4 Offer services to parents and other adult community members. 85% 2.5 Extended hours Offer services at least 15 hours per week on average and provide services when school is not in session, such as during the summer and holidays. 2.5 Offer services at least 15 hrs/week and provide out of school time services. 75% Partnerships Reported in program narrative Participants, Hours Reported in PPICS

28 Program Measures Objective 3. 21st CCLCs will serve children and community members with the greatest need for expanded learning opportunities. Outcome Indicator Performance Measure Percentage of centers that are… Target 3.1 High-need communities More than 80% of centers are located in high-poverty communities. 3.1 Title 1 and percentage of students eligible for reduced/free lunch. 80% Objective 4. Achievement of Adequate Yearly Progress 4.1 Schools will achieve Adequate Yearly Progress. 4.1 Schools In Good Standing.100% HI DOE provides data

29 Grant Updates and Timeline Level funding for the first three years of the grant Fourth year of the grant, funds reduced by 25% Fifth year of the grant, funds reduced by 50% Estimate funding level funding (same as previous year) Allocation for next year should come down to the complexes by August 30, Grantees with $50,000 or more of unspent funds needs to talk to Dan about their carryover monies and the plans for those monies.

30 Change in Request for Proposal (RFP) Process for 21st CCLC: This change was added to the Competitive Priorities Section of the 21st CCLC request for proposal beginning SY Priority will be given to new grantees provided they meet the specifications of the grant. Cohorts whose funding has ended after their five years of funding may reapply for the grant. These cohorts must show in their grant application, data and evidence that the 21st CCLC program has made an impact on their community and that significant gains were made by the students who participated in the program. These cohorts, if application is approved, may receive funding for up to three years at a funding level that is no higher than what was received in the last year of the original grant. Funding will also be reduced in each subsequent year. Year 1 of three years - Funding at the level that is no higher than what was received in the 5th year of their original grant. Year 2 of three years – 25% less of what was received in the previous year (Year 1). Year 3 of three years – 50% less of what was received in the first year (Year 1) of new funding.

31 Change in Request for Proposal (RFP) Process for 21st CCLC (cont.): These cohorts will be held to the same program and fiscal requirements as all grantees of the program. These cohorts will not be allowed to carry over funds from the previous grant and must return all unspent monies to the state before they will be allowed to receive their new monies. If a grantee is in a cohort whose funding cycle is ending and decides not to reapply for the funds for next year, but has carryover monies, the cohort may request an extension from the State Program Manager. The extension will be at no cost, up to one year to complete the activities of the grant. These grantees will still be required to submit an executive summary of their program for the year. This option was taken by all in Cohort 1,2, 3 and 4 for the , and school year.

32 Procedures for an Extension at No Cost after funding has ended Submit a letter or addressed to Dan explaining the following by June 16 th : How much monies do you have remaining and want to carry over? What activities are you planning to do that you were not able to complete in your grant? What centers will be involved in this extension? Timeline of when your activities will be completed. Funds can be extended up to June 1, Extension at No Cost Justification Template Dan will respond back either by letter or on whether or not your extension has been approved.

33 Updates / information for and School Year Temporary Contract Employees (TCE) – Willie Keola TCE are used to temporarily hire someone with unique set of skills to perform duties for a set amount of time TCE Description of duties needs to be unique

34 Updates / information for and School Year Personnel Issues Hiring and Termination questions – District PRO PTT and PPT are casual employee – paid for instruction only Planning Time is not an allowable expense under the grant 21 st CCLC funds are not to be used to pay for substitute teachers during the regular school day so 21 st CCLC PTTs or PPTs can attend conference during normal school hours

35 Audit Findings from Grant Thornton Payroll Certifications All should be using the 100% funded form – working solely on a single program working solely on a single program A Payroll Certification (PC1 – Revised July 2009) shall be completed and signed by the employee or supervisor twice a year for employees working solely on a single federal funded program. Certifications shall be: a. Signed and dated within 30 days after the end of the reporting period, and b. For the six months ending December 31 and June 30 of each year.

36 Audit Findings from Grant Thornton Procurement – procurement of goods and/or services Quick Reference Matrix for Procurement of GoodsProcurement of Goods Quick Reference Matrix for Procurement of ServicesProcurement of Services Submit Procurement questions in writing and SPMS will confer with the Contracts and Procurement Branch regarding site specific questions

37 Audit Findings from Grant Thornton Equipment and Real Property Management Equipment and property must be acquired in accordance with state law Property equipment records are maintained for equipment All equipment acquired with federal dollars is used in the program for which it was acquired A physical inventory of all federal equipment is taken and properly filed

38 Audit Findings from Grant Thornton Equipment and Real Property Management Items purchased with 21 st CCLC funds with an Inventory Threshold of $1, or more and theft - sensitive items, (i.e. computers, printers, video cameras/equipment, TVs, flash drives/USB, iPod, cellular phone) need to be properly tagged with 21 st CCLC grant information and stored in the proper location (It is best to attempt to tag all items purchased with 21 st CCLC funds if possible) Information to be written on items purchased with 21 st CCLC funds – use labels, Permanent Marker or engraving pen: Property Number Decal Number Fiscal Year purchased School Name 21 st CCLC Program All items purchased with 21 st CCLC funds that are loaned out or borrowed need to have a sign in/sign out system or logging system in place Borrower and Location Teacher and Room/Bldg. #

39 Updates / information for and School Year OBM Circular A-87 (Attachment B 1-42) Establishes principles and standards for determining costs for Federal awards carried out through grants, cost reimbursement contracts, and other agreements with State and local governments and federally-recognized Indian tribal governments (governmental units). 87/a087-all.html 87/a087-all.html

40 Updates / information for and School Year Supplement not Supplant The term supplement is defined as to add to while the term supplant, means "to replace or take the place of. Both federal and state law require that 21 st CCLC funds be used to supplement (increase), but not supplant (replace), the existing level of federal, state, local and other non-federal or state funds that have been available to conduct before and after school program activities.

41 Updates / information for and School Year Travel (In-state and out of state) Allowable and approved Unapproved travel taken with 21 st CCLC funds – funds need to be AC-4 back into 21 st CCLC program account – is considered a violation Needs to be reflected in application and budgeted for Fund raising for travel Funding for travel comes from private and outside sources Use 21st CCLC in the past to pay for registration fees and rental cars, along with a few per diems

42 Updates / information for and School Year Summer School Fee Exemption but dont charge higher than normal summer school fee Make sure you have a sliding scale Income collected from fees must be used to fund program activities specified in the grant application

43 Timeline DateEventOther Info March 24 th – June 16 th New RFP is out for complexes to apply for funding RFP to be posted on DOE website and on DOE Memos and Notices Tuesday, April 6 th PPICS Web site is openReport data for Summer Term 2009 and school year By Monday, July 26 th Notification of new awards for Notification will be by either or phone call with a follow up letter Thursday, September 9 th (Tentative Date) Meeting for all 21 st CCLC grantees; new and returning 8:30 – 3:00; Site TBA By Tuesday, August 31 st monies are released to the schools Date is depended upon when state receive the funds Friday, October 22 nd End of year local evaluation report due Send electronic reports to Dan Friday, November 5 th Last day to enter data into PPICS for Hawaii Dan needs to have data entered so that he can validate it for feds and PREL reporting.

44 Next Steps Questions and Answers Reflection Evaluation

45 Contact information Daniel Williams Special Programs Management Section nd Avenue Room 126 Honolulu, HI x 2213


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