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Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative CRITICAL SKILL SHORTAGES INITIATIVE WORKSHOPS.

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Presentation on theme: "Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative CRITICAL SKILL SHORTAGES INITIATIVE WORKSHOPS."— Presentation transcript:

1 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative CRITICAL SKILL SHORTAGES INITIATIVE WORKSHOPS

2 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative WELCOME TO THE CRITICAL SKILL SHORTAGES INITIATIVE WORKSHOP WORKSHOP I Identifying Key Sectors and Skill Shortages

3 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 3 Identifying Key Sectors and Skill Shortages Overview: How to... Determine Key Sectors Analyze Industries and Employers Identify Critical Skill Shortage Occupations Technical Assistance and Resources Healthcare Case Study CSSI Workshop II: Determining Root Causes and Solutions

4 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 4 Identifying Key Sectors and Skill Shortages Determine Key Sectors: Industry Employment Projections: Size: Maintain existing base New Jobs: Industries adding the most new jobs Growth: Expanding industries; opportunities for economic development

5 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 5 Identifying Key Sectors and Skill Shortages Analyze Industries and Employers: Industries within Sectors Contribution to Regional Economy and Local Economies Number and Size of Firms Geographic Concentration of Firms Economic Development Criteria

6 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 6 Identifying Key Sectors and Skill Shortages Identify Critical Skill Shortage Occupations: Industry Staffing Patterns Matrix CSSI Criteria: Critical to industry competitiveness Strong employment demand Provide good earnings Industry Validation of Necessary Skills and Training

7 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 7 Identifying Key Sectors and Skill Shortages Technical Assistance and Resources: IDES: Local Employment Dynamics – New hires data, Retention studies, Age analysis Job vacancy surveys Economic development plans, community audits Input from: Labor organizations Chambers of Commerce Business and employer associations Training providers and personnel placement firms

8 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 8 Identifying Key Sectors and Skill Shortages Healthcare Case Study: Northeast Economic Development Region Industries: Ambulatory Care (Doctors Offices, Home Health Care Services) Acute Care (Hospitals) Long-Term Care (Nursing Homes and Personal Care Facilities) Occupations: Nursing Cluster (RNs, LPNs, CNAs) Medical Technology Cluster

9 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 9 Identifying Key Sectors and Skill Shortages CSSI Workshop II: Determining Root Causes and Solutions Healthcare Case Study (continued): Annually, in the Northeast Econ. Dev. Region, short-termlong-term Estimated shortage of RNs in Ambulatory Care80200 concentrated in Kane County4075 in Acute Care concentrated in Cook County concentrated in Lake County50100

10 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative WELCOME TO THE CRITICAL SKILL SHORTAGES INITIATIVE WORKSHOP WORKSHOP II Analyzing Causes and Developing Solutions for Skill Shortages

11 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 11 Review Of Workshop I What are major sectors? How do you determine key sectors? How do you analyze key sectors – industries and types of employers? How do you identify critical skill shortages? Healthcare example

12 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 12 Overview of Workshop II How do you determine root causes and identify solutions? Employer issues Education issues – secondary and post- secondary

13 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 13 How Do We Determine Root Causes Of The Shortages? First, examine how individuals become qualified for the shortage occupation (i.e., formal occupational education & training, apprenticeships, or on-the- job). Second, examine the capacity of the training system to produce qualified applicants (i.e., total capacity, dropouts, and completion rates). Third examine the methods used by employers to recruit qualified applicants (i.e., successful program completers, word-of-mouth, placement agencies, ISM, etc.).

14 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 14 How Do We Determine Root Causes Of The Shortages? Fourth, examine the adequacy of K-12 activities designed to make students and potential applicants aware of opportunities and prepared to (i.e., prerequisite skills) enter the occupation or related vocational training. And, fifth examine the degree to which excessive job turnover may be contributing to the shortage.

15 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 15 First Stop The Leaks! Dont just focus on increasing capacity (i.e., the number and/or size) of vocational training programs, without first stopping all the leaks. Capacity Utilization - Are vocational programs operating at full capacity? Successful Completion - Are too many students dropping out or failing? Job Placement - Are successful completers getting training-related jobs locally? Retention - Are qualified individuals leaving the occupation too soon?

16 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 16 First Stop The Leaks! Quantify how dealing with these issues could reduce the shortage. Focus only on issues that can be shown will reduce the shortage. Stopping the leaks and using existing capacity is the most cost effective means of dealing with the shortage. Only then look at options to increase training capacity.

17 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 17 How Do We Determine What Factors Contribute To High Turnover? Talk directly with HR personnel from employers in the region. Talk to representatives from industry associations. Talk to labor representatives. Review existing industry sponsored research. Survey incumbent workers and / or recent job leavers. Look at the relative success of training completers by program. * Only focus on retention issues if it can be shown that turnover is significant and/or above industry norms.

18 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 18 The retention rate for workers in Hospitals and Medical Offices exceeds other industries.

19 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 19 Example Of Report Focusing On Retention By Training Provider

20 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 20 What are typical causes of high turnover? Applicants inadequately prepared Lack prerequisite skills Lack technical skills Lack a realistic knowledge of the conditions of employment Failure to accommodate needs of non- traditional workers Single parents Handicapped/ disabled Language

21 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 21 What are typical causes of high turnover? Stress on the job: Shift rotation Mandatory overtime Physical demands Safety issues Psychological demands Aging workforce / retirement

22 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 22 Factors cited as contributing to high turnover of RNs Poor pay and benefits Poor relationships with physicians Lack of voice in patient care issues Mandatory overtime and lack of scheduling flexibility Patient load and pace of work due to understaffing Lack of access to supervisors and mentors Documentation requirements

23 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 23 Reasons cited by nurses for remaining with the same employer for 5 or more years

24 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 24 Solutions suggested to reduce turnover of nursing staff in hospitals Redesign work processes using collaborative work models, designed to meet patient, worker, and organizational needs, while ensuring that the work of caregivers and support staff is meaningful. Revise reward systems to encourage collaborative and multidisciplinary approaches to accomplish work. Adopt new communication and information technology solutions to reduce duplicate data entry, improve communication, and improve workflow. Modify work environments to accommodate older workers (e.g., the mean age of the nurse population in 2000 was 47; it was 25 in 1980).

25 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 25 Solutions suggested to reduce turnover of nursing staff in hospitals Improve scheduling and reduce mandatory overtime by anticipating peak demand better, spreading out admissions, and cross training staff to develop a float pool of talent. Analyze where (in what units) turnover is greatest and look more closely for issues in those units. Overall do a better job of listening to the workers and upgrading front-line management skills,

26 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 26 Selected Sources of Community College Program Performance Information Data and Characteristics of the Illinois Community College System. Annual Enrollment and Completion Report. Career and Technical Follow-up Study. Focus Report on Nursing Programs in Illinois Community Colleges. Program Review Report. Results Report. Performance Indicators for Higher Education. Perkins Postsecondary Performance Measures. Adult Education and Family Literacy National Reporting System Performance Indicators. Integrated Postsecondary Data Systems (IPEDS) Performance Reporting. Accreditation Status – Institutional and Program Specific.

27 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 27 Illinois Community College System 48 community colleges blanket the state career and technical credit programs provided. Noncredit courses and customized offerings are provided to meet the needs of area employers and residents. Business and Industry/Economic Development Offices are active at every College. Statewide liaison ICCB Workforce Division. Designated MIS Coordinators serve as the primary state data contact at each College. Statewide liaison ICCB Policy Studies Division.

28 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 28 Associate Degree Nursing (AND) Programs in Community Colleges Train Registered Nurses (RN) RN training is the largest community college career and technical education program. RN is the highest level of community college nursing training. Program Duration – Requires 2+ years of full-time enrollment. 42 of 48 Community Colleges provide RN training. 44 Associate Degree Nursing programs exist in the state. Illinois Department of Professional Regulation licenses.

29 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 29 Statewide Community College Registered Nursing (RN) Enrollments Are Increasing STATEWIDE Reported RN enrollments in FY2002 totaled 11,009 statewide percent – One year percent change percent – Five Year percent change. SOURCE: Annual Enrollment and Completion (A1) Data

30 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 30 Community Colleges in the Governors Northeast Economic Development Region City Colleges of Chicago (7) Elgin Community College Joliet Junior College Kankakee Community College Kishwaukee Community College College of Lake County Moraine Valley Community College Morton College Oakton Community College Prairie State College South Suburban College Triton College Waubonsee Community College

31 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 31 Regionally Community College Registered Nursing (RN) Enrollments Are Increasing REGIONAL – Northeast Economic Development Region Reported RN enrollments in FY2002 totaled 6,116 in the region percent – One year percent change percent – Five year percent change. SOURCE: Annual Enrollment and Completion (A1) Data

32 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 32 Statewide Community College Registered Nursing Completions Are Decreasing STATEWIDE RN completions in FY2002 totaled 1,590 statewide percent – One year percent change percent – Five Year percent change. SOURCE: Annual Enrollment and Completion (A1) Data

33 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 33 Regionally Community College Registered Nursing Completions Are Decreasing REGIONAL – Northeast Economic Development Region RN completions in FY2002 totaled 895 in the region percent – One year percent change percent – Five Year percent change. SOURCE: Annual Enrollment and Completion (A1) Data

34 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 34 Career and Technical Follow-up Study Results for Registered Nursing Graduates 95.6 percent of RN graduates were employed and/or continuing their education one year after graduation. Overall graduates reported positive levels of satisfaction one year after graduation with their Careers M = 4.25/5.00 and Program Components M = 4.16/5.00. Earnings averaged $31,390 annually for full-time entry level workers. Among working graduates, 95.7 percent were employed in the field percent worked in the district where they were trained and 25.7 percent worked elsewhere in Illinois. SOURCE: Career and Technical Follow-up Study.

35 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 35 Program Improvement Initiatives to Address Leaks in the Pipeline Academic preparation of potential students. Student retention. Seek ways to increase program capacity to accommodate additional students based on demand.

36 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 36 Recommendations from the Focus Report on Nursing Programs in Illinois Community Colleges Continue efforts to improve student retention. Carefully monitor the local job market for Nursing graduates and adjust enrollment caps to meet demand. Maintain close contacts with employers in the various healthcare settings (hospitals, nursing homes, home health care agencies, physicians offices, clinics, ambulatory surgical centers, emergency medical centers, etc.) to more fully meet employer needs.

37 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 37 Selected Issues Impacting Registered Nursing Faculty availability Clinical site availability. Regulated parameters for training/education. Expanded options for traditional worker populations. Pay versus responsibility versus other employment options. Working conditions (scheduling, hours, stress, workload, physical requirements of the work, etc.). Role in the overall healthcare profession.

38 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 38 Potential Approaches to Address Issues Impacting Registered Nursing Compensation and recognition for faculty. Creative and expanded partnerships with the healthcare provider community. Collaboration with regulators. Nontraditional student recruitment. Adequate staffing levels using creative ways to provide greater flexibility to schedules. Job analysis to improve working conditions (Ergonomic approaches that minimize bending, reaching, and lifting; stress management training, etc.). Career ladders for individuals with the requisite skill sets. Seek opportunities to elevate the status of nurses within the healthcare community. Provide additional recognition for accomplishments.

39 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 39 Additional Issues Impacting Registered Nursing Declining numbers of nursing graduates. Aging RN Workforce. Declines in Relative Earnings. Population Growth and Aging. Trends in Healthcare Financing. Distribution of Demand by Setting. SOURCE: Projected Supply, Demand and Shortages of Registered Nurses US Department of Health and Human Services (July, 2002)

40 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 40 Higher Education Committee to Review Health Professions Education Programs Illinois Board of Higher Educations Committee to Review Health Professions Education Programs Policies and Priorities for Health-Related Programs (August, 2003). Registered Nursing (4,151) is the healthcare fields in which Illinois is projected to have the greatest need for workers annually through Registered Nurses (143) is fifth on the top ten list of fields in which Illinois annually needs more health care workers than it has been producing based on the past five years. Increasing capacity in Registered Nursing is recommended. pdf

41 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 41 Education For Employment Regional Delivery System Secondary Career and Technical Education is managed via 60 regions incorporating 508 local districts Boundaries are aligned with ROE or CC Coordination of K-8 career awareness and 9-12 career planning and preparation

42 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 42 Secondary Supply ** Root Causes ** Counseling practices – is there adequate career awareness at K-8? Students do not take advantage of program access Negative parental perceptions of CTE Parental information is limited regarding postsecondary requirements

43 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 43 Root Causes… Budget cuts – program elimination Weak collaboration between secondary and post-sec.; program articulation is needed for seamless transition between levels Disconnect between minimum HS graduation requirements and college entrance requirements

44 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 44 Secondary CTE Supply FY Statewide Enrollment: Nursing Cluster 2, Practical Nursing Nursing Asst/Aide 232 All Health Occupations 6,090 All Secondary CTE 348,433

45 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 45 Solutions… Review programmatic offerings in the region How? – contact Education for Employment regional director Source – ISBE web resource

46 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 46 Solutions… Review enrollment/completion patterns in secondary health occupations programs How? – via EFE director access ISIS reports Source – handout re CIP codes

47 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 47 Solutions… Review School Report Cards for state, district, and schools How? – ISBE web resource Source:

48 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 48 Solutions… Analyze CTE Performance Management Information System results for selected programs How? – contact EFE director for reports available by program/program area/school/district/region/state Source – handout sample

49 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 49 Solutions… Review quality and extent of K-8 career awareness efforts How? – contact EFE director to discuss activities such as interest inventories, job shadowing opportunities, career fairs, etc.

50 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 50 Other Solutions Analyze teacher availability via ISBE Teacher Service Record System Analyze dual credit options (ISBE Census of HS Students Enrolled) Seek non-traditional enrollees – Ex., Are you man enough to be a nurse Review existing articulation agreements and enrollment/completion patterns (contact community college)

51 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 51 Illinois Efforts Explore recruitment of retired nurses P-16 IL Education Research Council at SIU-E Compare and contrast hs exit-level standards and assessments to post-sec entrance and placement exams Expand focus from access to college to access to success in college

52 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 52 ISBE Initiatives Development of IL Student Information System/state-issued ID/data quality training/data standards School Improvement Planning tools (handout webpage) High Schools That Work – a major focus is career and academic guidance and counseling Development of secondary to post-secondary transition measures

53 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 53 Planning Grant Review Process Non-competitive but must be responsive to elements in RFA Reviewer criteria includes: Willingness of partners to redirect funds to address critical skill shortages Depth of involvement and input from consortium members in developing the planning application

54 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 54 PLANNING GRANT REVIEW PROCESS Reviewer criteria includes (continued): Quality of the work plan Qualifications of individuals assigned to the project Reasonableness and justification of requested costs Overall responsiveness to the requirements of the RFA

55 Governors Workforce Development Conference October 24, 2003 Critical Skill Shortages Initiative 55 Wrap Up Three most important things to remember: 1. REGION! 2. REGION! 3. REGION! Comprehensive, inclusive, regional consortium is critical to success Proposal must be responsive to RFA requirements Dont hesitate to ask for TA: contact Lori Clark at 312/ ;


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