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Victoria Duff, Coordinator Mentoring for Quality Induction Initiative

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1 NEW JERSEY MENTORING FOR QUALITY INDUCTION: A Toolkit for Program Development
Victoria Duff, Coordinator Mentoring for Quality Induction Initiative Office of Academic and Professional Standards New Jersey Department of Education (609) Linda Munger, Ph.D., Project Facilitator National Staff Development Council Welcome Let me add my deepest thanks to all of you who made this toolkit become a reality – most particularly the mentoring task force for their wisdom and expertise and unending desire to make this practical and effective The Professional Teaching Standards Board for paving the way The National Staff Development Council for guidance, support, consultation, writing and editing The staff and friends with whom I work (Jan) for seeing me through the highs and lows of the publication process The LPDC’s who reviewed and gave initial feedback on the toolkit The regional offices of the DOE Today is about giving you a basic overview of mentoring and induction, while giving you an overview of your role as LPDC’ It is about looking at a process adopted into state regulation that was developed to ensure that all novice teachers in the state of New Jersey receive adequate support and guidance in their first year/years. It is about providing all district LPDC’s and other stakeholders with tools to develop effective mentoring plans, not only develop – but implement. It is about walking through this tool so you have a sense of where this is headed. The responsibility of the LPDC is to design and help the implementation of the mentoring. They do not need to do the actual work of training, evaluating, etc. Norms Bathrooms, Refreshments, cell phones to vibrate We will walk you through the toolkit as if this was a regular training session. Materials Cards to jot down questions Post-its for an activity Agenda Activity Sheets Contact list Training Evaluation Baseline Mentoring Survey Rubric For Assessment Why have the LPDC’s been chosen? You are the experts in your district for professional development This is targeted professional development that should be connected to all the reform issues and initiatives in your district. This should not be an add-on.

2 Welcome and Introductions
Acknowledgments Introductions and preparation for working in pairs or small groups during the session Share name, district/school, position relevant to a mentoring program (e.g., LPDC member, school leader, district administrator, county superintendent, DOE) Reflection: Remember your first teaching job. What helped you most? What hurt you most? What support do you wish you’d had? Acknowledgement pages included in Overview Folder It is important to put yourself in the shoes of a new teacher as you begin the process of developing a program/plan. Novice teachers are not fully cooked – Novice teachers carry a purse rather than a trunk.

3 Outcomes for the Session
Participants will be able to: Turn-key the information about the toolkit to other LPDC members and other mentoring stakeholders Access information in the toolkit to align the district mentoring plan with the state regulations and New Jersey Professional Standards for Teachers The purpose of today is to give you initial training on what is expected in a mentoring plan. The toolkit was specifically written for you – it is not a how to mentor toolkit. Induction and Mentoring are effective when -there is a plan in place that provides the mentor and the novice the supports necessary to work together -the school leader provides guidance and support for the program – the school leaders champion the needs of the novice and the mentor -the district invests in the process -the process focuses on effective instruction based on the needs of the students in the district

4 Norms Maintain focus on the purpose and content of the toolkit
Engage in the activities Note issues and concerns to be addressed on index cards Take time to reflect on how this impacts your mentoring program Organize your questions around implementation of the toolkit Respect different points of view

5 Overview of the Session
Purpose of the session Agenda Review items on the agenda Examine folder titles and icons (O-2) Review Table of Contents Walk through Folder One Q & A (e.g., use of index cards) Overview Folder Reference 0-2: What is the Mentoring Resource Toolkit? Table of Contents Walk Through Folder One Introduction Each district LPDC will receive one toolkit, each local board will receive one toolkit Each district will receive two CD’s The entire toolkit will be accessed on our website and will be updated annually. Handling the toolkit – You may want to: Put a piece of stock paper between the narrative and the resources Put the crucial pieces in a notebook

6 Review of Table of Contents
Overview Folder One: Understanding Mentoring for Quality Induction Folder Two: District Mentoring Plan: The District Mentoring Plan Development and Approval Process Folder Three: District Mentoring Plan: Program Evaluation Process Folder One – begins the conversation, provides you with research and recommendations for an effective mentoring and induction plan; should be the folder that begins the conversation for all groups involved in the process.; Folder one talks about vision and goals Folder Two – Defines how the mentoring plan will be written, give guidelines and resources to support the writing; for the LPDC Folder 3 – provides the information you will need to support a good evaluation of your plan, evaluation is required by the regulation and must be reported annually through the QAAR process: supports the LPDC and the administration in program evaluation

7 Review of Table of Contents
Folder Four: Districting Mentoring Plan: Components of Mentor Training Folder Five: District Mentoring Plan: Components of Novice Teacher Training Folder Six: The School Leader’s Role in Mentoring in Quality Induction Folder Seven: Plan Approval and the Local Board of Education Appendices Folder six is critical for all school leaders in the district. Their support makes or breaks an effective program. This toolkit is designed to help you establish the a mentoring program that meets the requirements set forth in the regulations or move beyond. We have provided tools from districts within the state, as well as tools from research. There are districts that have more than a one year program and want to move further into the induction process. There are districts with relatively no turnover, who will develop a program that may not be implemented for several years. There are districts that have an ongoing program that merely needs refining and connections to other programs in the district. Mentoring should not be an add-on, rather it should enhance what already occurs.

8 “Supporting new teachers is complex and demanding work, and it involves learning skills other than those that most classroom teachers possess. It is critical, therefore, that we think not only about what a new teacher needs to be successful but also what a mentor teacher needs to know and be able to do in order to support a new teacher.” Quote is found in Overview Folder While this toolkit is not about how to mentor, but rather about how to develop a program, we need to always keep the reasons we mentor in the forefront: -to ensure that all students have qualified teachers -to strengthen teaching and learning in all classrooms -to provide novice teachers with the tools to become more effective more quickly in their classroom -to retain the teachers we hire within the district and within teaching We know that it takes years to become an excellent teacher, years of experience that allows successful teachers to build a repertoire of strategies and knowledge to support learning in the classroom. Yet – we expect those that come to us straight out of college, or those that come from an alternate career – to walk in with that knowledge. That is an unrealistic expectation. At a time when accountability is the very heart of what is expected, we need more than ever to have a formal period of induction and mentoring support that: -provides support in setting goals and classroom expectations -provides tools for setting classroom routines or behavior management techniques -provides practice in differentiating instruction, motivating students, and using research-based strategies that allow students to build knowledge -provides guidance on interpersonal skills with students, parents and colleagues As we walk through the toolkit and review how to build an effective program – let’s also walk in the shoes of the novice and the mentor and think in terms of their needs, their fears, their frustrations. Moir and Gless, New Teacher UCSC

9 Institutional Commitment & Support Program Vision Induction Program
Essential Components Quality Mentoring Professional Standards Many of you have excellent programs – for mentoring and for induction. Developing district plans helps to ensure that novice teachers receive the support they need and mentors are trained in the skills necessary to be effective in the mentoring relationship – interpersonal skills, articulation skills, question skills. For too long most of our mentors have only been trained in roles and responsibilities or the very basics of collegial work. Mentoring is hard, but extremely satisfying work when done correctly. This is a piece of helping you to articulate your goals and vision to the board of education. Classroom-based Teacher Learning New Teacher UCSC

10 What is Induction? Phases of Teacher Development
Period of Socialization & Enculturation A Formal Program for Beginning Teachers Sources: Sharon Feiman-Nemser, Opening Address,New Teacher Center Research Forum, Jan New Teacher UCSC

11 Induction for What? New professional norms of collaboration and on-going learning Improved teaching performance Increased student achievement, especially among traditionally underachieved student populations New Teacher UCSC Today’s teachers (veteran and new) are faced with: Understanding how students learn Meeting very diverse student needs within one classroom setting Creating and fostering a safe, respectful and motivating classroom learning environment Personalizing and making relevant learning experiences Providing quality instruction to every child THE PURPOSE OF YOUR MENTORING PLAN WILL BE TO ENSURE THAT YOU ARE CREATING TEACHER CAPACITY TO MAKE THESE THINGS HAPPEN

12 Navigating the Toolkit

13 Folder 1: Understanding Mentoring for Quality Induction
Introduction Guiding Questions Glossary Key Resources The Case for Mentoring for Quality Induction Research on Mentoring and Induction Critical Attributes of Effective Mentoring Why Mentoring is Vital Key Principles in Mentoring for Quality Induction Mentoring for Quality Induction Program Guidelines (8 guidelines) References Appendix: Resources

14 Folder 1: Narrative Section
Directions: Skim the content of Folder 1 to answer these questions: What are the critical attributes (F1-2) that you would use to guide the development or revisions of your local mentoring plan? Which key principles (F1-3&4) are critical for your district to focus on as you develop, revise, or expand your mentoring plan? Think about your existing program. Based on these attributes – what does your program do and what doesn’t it do? Based on the principles. These beliefs are reflected in our program These principles are not yet reflected in their program.

15 Folder 1: Resources Resource 1: New Jersey Regulations Governing Mentoring (N.J.A.C. 6A:9-8.4) Resource 2: New Jersey Regulations Governing Evaluation of Provisional Teachers (N.J.A.C. 6A:9-8.6) Resource 3: New Jersey Professional Standards for Teachers (N.J.A.C. 6A:9-3.3) Resource 4: NCLB Key Elements of High Quality Professional Development Annotated Bibliography What are some of the key pieces of the regulations? LPDC develops the plan Local Board of Education approves the plan one year mentoring application process for mentors established criteria for mentors comprehensive mentor training rigorous mentoring program for novice teachers novice teacher pays mentor stipend in lieu of state fund monitored through program evaluation and QAAR (QSAK) Which folders will help the LPDC and other stakeholders develop a plan? Folders 2 – The Plan Folder 3 – Program Evaluation Folder 4 & 5 - Support for the Mentor and the Novice Teacher Key Principles – What are your beliefs and assumptions about mentoring? Guidelines help to set the tone for the plan. Folder one begins the conversation that enriches the teaching and learning process within a district and validates the concept of teacher as learner.

16 Navigating the Toolkit

17 Folder 2: District Mentoring Plan: The District Plan Development and Approval Process
Introduction Guiding Questions Glossary Key Resources State Regulations Governing the District Mentoring Plan To the LPDC: Before You Begin Assess Current Status of District/School Mentoring Efforts Begin with the End in Mind - IT’S ALL ABOUT VISION! Write the District Mentoring Plan Sections 1 – 11 District Plan Approval Plan District Plan Approval Timeline Appendix: Resources

18 New Jersey Professional Standards for Teachers
Standard One: Subject Matter Knowledge Standard Two: Human Growth and Development Standard Three: Diverse Learners Standard Four: Instructional Planning and Strategies Standard Five: Assessment Standard Six: Learning Environment Standard Seven: Special Needs Standard Eight: Communication Standard Nine: Collaboration and Partnership Standard Ten: Professional Development One of the best tools for understanding the Professional Standard for Teachers – should be used first with the group who will write the plan, the local board of education, the mentors, the novice teachers, veteran teachers and parents. It gives us a common language, a definition of effective teaching, a tool for conversation and dialogue, a guide for professional learning, a lens for the mentor to view practice and a mirror for the novice to reflect on practice. F2-R3

19 Subject Matter Knowledge Human Growth and Development
Diverse Learners Instructional Planning and Strategies Assessment Learning Environment Special Needs Communication Collaboration and Partnerships Professional Development Novice teachers need to learn how to teach before they can teach content effectively. F2-R2

20 Each person gets 7 post-its.
Resource 2: New Jersey Professional Standards for Teachers Awareness Activity Directions Each person gets 7 post-its. Identify what a teacher needs to know and be able to do to be an effective teacher in the classroom and write on comment per post-it. In pairs or triads, share and place post-its in the appropriate boxes for the New Jersey Professional Standards for Teachers F2-R2

21 Reflection What teaching standards have the most post-its? Why?
Do novice teachers need to focus on certain teaching standards more during their first year of teaching? Why? Did you notice any overlap where a post-it idea might fit with several teaching standards? Why? How will this knowledge enable you to develop an effective mentoring/induction plan? How will novice teachers in your district/school be supported to implement the New Jersey Professional Standards for Teachers?

22 Key Components of District Mentoring Plan
Regulations Components of District Mentoring Plan Section 1: District Profile Section 2: Needs Assessment P Section 3: Vision and Goals Section 4: Mentor Selection Section 5: Roles and Responsibilities for Mentors Section 6: Professional Learning Components for Mentors Section 7: Professional Learning Components for Novices Section 8: Action Plan for Implementation Section 9: Resource Options Used Section 10: Funding Resources Section 11: Program Evaluation Districts will develop plans that are: (green activity sheet) practical designed to meet the needs of the novice within the culture of the district developed to ensure successful teaching focused on the students There are no minimum number of pages and no maximum. You have to develop a plan that is right for the district but the meets the minimum requirements of the regulations. Plans should follow a template. Who can be involved in providing input for a mentoring program? LPDC School Leaders Mentoring Coordinator or Staff Developer Association Mentors Novice teachers School Board Parents Needs Assessment Where will you get the data to support the components of your plan? Who will provide input? F2-R8

23 Rubric for Assessment of Current Status of District Mentoring Plan
Needs Assessment Process Vision Goals Objectives Mentor Selection Roles and Responsibilities Professional Learning – Mentors Professional Learning – Novice Teachers Action Plan and Resource Options Funding Resources Program Evaluation We will use the rubric throughout the rest of the training. You will identify for yourselves where you are on the rubric. The rubric is key to helping you assess where you are now and where you want to be. Where would you find yourself in the area of needs assessment? Who are you asking for input? What questions will support your thinking? F2-R7

24 Section 3 of the District Mentoring Plan: Vision and Goals
At a minimum goals must: Enhance teacher knowledge of and strategies related to the CCCS in order to facilitate student achievement; Identify exemplary teaching skills and educational practices necessary to acquire and maintain excellence in teaching; and Assist novice teachers in the performance of their duties and adjustment to the challenges of teaching. What is your vision for mentoring? How will that be articulated and to whom? (assess yourself on this component of the rubric) -recruitment -effective practice -retention of teachers in the district and in the profession F2-5

25 SMART Goal During a three-year induction program, 90% of all novice teachers in the Toms River School District will be retained as measured by job satisfaction, teacher efficacy, and impact of teacher effectiveness aligned to the New Jersey Professional Standards for Teachers.

26 S – specific, standards-based M – Measurable A – Achievable
SMART Goal S – specific, standards-based M – Measurable A – Achievable R – Relevant T – Tactically sound F2-R14

27 SMART Goal During a three-year induction program (achievable),
90% of all novice teachers (measurable) in the Toms River School District will be retained (specific) as measured by job satisfaction, teacher efficacy, and impact of teacher effectiveness (relevant, tactically sound) aligned to the New Jersey Professional Standards for Teachers (standards-based). Look at rubric and identify where you are in the first six areas. We will get to the other five areas after the break. The rubric will help you understand where your program is and where it needs to go.

28 Folder 2: Resource Section
Graphic District Mentoring Plan Development and Approval Process (F2-R1) Mentoring for Quality Induction Program Checklist (F2-R6a-b) Rubric for Assessment of a District/School Mentoring Plan (F2-R7) District Mentoring Plan Checklist (F2-R8) Resources for each section (F2-R9 - R31) Pull out the yellow rubric. We will begin looking at this rubric in view of your existing plan., It is this rubric that will help you to revise or rework your plan. ****You do not need to write a whole new plan. You should be able to start with an existing plan. Mentor Selection is done through specific criteria and application – a variety of tools to help in that process. Roles and Responsibilities – make public all of the roles of the key stakeholders using the various folders to help you define those. What supports will you put in place? A handbook, observation time, time for meetings within the partnership, focus groups for mentors and novices, e-mentoring F2-2

29 What needs to be in a district mentoring plan?
Folder 2: District Mentoring Plan: The District Plan Development and Approval Process What needs to be in a district mentoring plan? F2-R9: District Profile Sheet F2-R11: Signoff Sheet F2-R10: Sample Table of Contents for District Mentoring Plan F2-R8: District Mentoring Plan Checklist Narrative section (must include 20 mentoring plan for alternate route) F

30 Timeline Overview April-August ’05: Plan development by the LPDC and stakeholders begins September 1, ’05: Initial plan goes to local board of education September ’05: Local board of education begins approval process September ’05: District begins program implementation and mentor assignments Note: Action plan: By May-June of 06 you will need a formal action plan that you will carry out and report on over the next three years. See F F2-8

31 Timeline October 1, ’05: Plan goes to county superintendent. It should include: Approved plan Statement of Assurance (Folder 7) Approval/ Comment form (Folder 7) The plan approval/comment form should be sent back to the LPDC

32 Timeline September ’05-’06: Ongoing mentoring plan implementation and program evaluation begins; action plan further developed. June 1,’ 06: Revised mentoring plan (including completed action plan) based on program evaluation results due to local board of education September 1, ’06 – Board approval to County Superintendent (3-year plan) November ‘06: First QAAR Report on mentoring program (department form)

33 Navigating the Toolkit

34 Folder 3: District Mentoring Plan: Program Evaluation Process
Introduction Guiding Questions Glossary Key Resources Overview of Program Evaluation Understanding the Evaluation Process Identify Indicators Identify Evaluation Questions Identify Data Methods and Sources Analyze Data Interpret Data Report Results/Findings Understanding the Evaluation Framework Creating an Evaluation Plan Responsibility to Stakeholders and QAAR Requirements References Appendix: Resources Slide 33: Folder 3 is meant to help LPDC plan an evaluation of their mentoring program. It is important to plan an evaluation while you are planning the mentoring program.

35 Folder 3: Program Evaluation Process
Figure 2. Evaluation Framework Components Program goals What does the program intend to accomplish? Measurable objectives What are the anticipated changes for teachers? What are the anticipated changes for students? Data collection How will the data be collected? Data analysis Information/data needed Data source Time line Location Killion (2002) Note: This folder will help you to understand the evaluation process as well as how to create an evaluation plan. Slide 34 Within the narrative section on page 6 – Figure 2 will identify the components that need to be defined in an evaluation plan. Please note that the program goals are critical. The evaluation plan is designed to gather evidence to see if the mentoring plan is implemented as planned and what impact the mentoring program is having on teacher effectiveness and student learning. The results of the evaluation will help to clarify what adjustments need to be made to the mentoring plan. F3-6

36 Understanding the Evaluation Framework
Level 1: Participants’ Reactions Level 2: Participants’ Learning Level 3: Organization Support and Change Level 4: Use of Knowledge and Skills Level 5: Student Learning Outcomes Kirkpatrick (1998) & Guskey (2000) Slide 35 – Two key components of the mentoring plan are designing training for mentors and novice teachers. Kirkpatrick and then Guskey have designed different levels of evaluating training components. The first three levels are minimal requirements. We are all used to evaluating participants’ reactions. It is also important to evaluate the support from the school leader as well as other types of organization support, such as resources and the impact the support has on implementation of the mentoring program. Some districts are ready to move to a higher level of evaluation, which includes teacher application of the NJ Professional Standards for Teacher for teacher effectiveness and impact on student learning. F3-6 and F3-R4

37 Baseline Data Number of novice teachers with a Certificate of Eligibility Number of novice teachers with a Certificate of Eligibility with Advanced Standing Number of novice special education teachers with a standard license Identify number of novice teachers in following areas: K-5, 6-8, 9-12, special education (all grades) Number of mentors We are asking you to help us help you. The College of New Jersey will help us develop strategies to support you in this new endeavor based on your information.

38 Scavenger Hunt Each folder (1 - 3) begins with a list of guiding questions, a glossary, and key resources. This activity will allow you an opportunity to explore the content of the folders and specific resources. Directions: Find the folder(s) with the answer to the specific guiding question and put the folder number(s) on the blank line. Note: The guiding question may be worded differently depending on the intended audience. The answer can be found in multiple folders. Directions: Find the resource with specific title and put the folder number (s) on the blank line. Note: The resource can be in multiple folders.

39 Navigating the Toolkit

40 Folder 4 : Components of Mentor Training
This will be helpful in completing Section 6 of the district mentoring plan. Discussion Questions: What are the minimum professional learning components your district will need to provide mentors so they will become effective in the mentoring process? How do the training components align with the New Jersey Professional Standards for Teachers? What are the resources that can support the mentor in guiding the novice teacher toward effective classroom practice? Mentoring requires some very definite skills. Many of those skills must be practice and refined if we are to be effective. There are districts who do not go beyond the basic support. Mentoring requires the veteran to be empathetic, to guide, to counsel, to clearly articulate effective teaching practice, to help the novice build confidence in dealing with challenges and to be an advocate for the novice. Most importantly it means the mentor must build a unique relationship built on trust and respect that is CONFIDENTIAL. You will want to train mentors carefully over the course of time. Mentors need to know what is expected and how they will be supported. Mentors need continuous support. In addition to training, they need opportunities to come together to discuss challenges, to assist in developing additional learning opportunities.

41 Folder 5 : Components of Novice Teacher Training
This will be helpful in completing Section 7 of the district mentoring plan. Discussion Questions: 1. What are the minimum professional learning components your district will need to provide so a novice teacher will become effective during is his/her first year in the classroom? 2. How do the training components align with the New Jersey Professional Standards for Teachers? Who should be mentored all provisional teachers all new teachers with standard certificates all new certificated staff all new to the district

42 Navigating the Toolkit

43 Folder 6: The School Leader’s Role in Mentoring for Quality Induction
Guiding Questions: What are the roles and responsibilities of the school leader with regard to mentoring? What types of support can school leaders provide? Who should be mentored all provisional teachers all new teachers with standard certificates all new certificated staff all new to the district

44 Folder 7: Plan Approval and the Local Board of Education
Guiding Questions: What are the state requirements for a local mentoring plan? What are the New Jersey Professional Standards for Teachers? What are the required components of a mentoring plan? What are the procedures for the approval process? What is the role of the local board of education in the approval process?

45 Appendices Glossary Annotated Bibliography State Mentoring Web Site
(http://www.state.nj.us/njded/profdev/mentor/) Resources Electronic Resources Print Resources

46 Q & A What questions do you have related to the use of the mentoring toolkit? For additional questions:

47 3 important things I’ve learned …
Reflection 3 important things I’ve learned … 2 ideas/thoughts I would like to share with others … 1 action I will take immediately is …


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