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XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial 10 1 Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial 10 – Managing Long Documents.

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Presentation on theme: "XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial 10 1 Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial 10 – Managing Long Documents."— Presentation transcript:

1 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial 10 1 Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial 10 – Managing Long Documents

2 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial 10 2 Use master documents in Word With Word, you can create a master document, which is a long document divided into smaller individual files, called subdocuments. Master documents are very useful when working with a document containing multiple sections. Working with each section individually reduces the time involved in opening, editing and closing a very large document.

3 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial 10 3 Create a master document, and create, split, merge, and remove subdocuments You can create a master document by converting an existing document into a master document and its parts into subdocuments. You can also create one by inserting existing files as subdocuments into an existing document. When you create a master and a subdocument, Word creates a new file using the name of the subdocument's first heading and saves it in the same folder as the master. –If a subdocument becomes too large, you can split the subdocument into two subdocuments –If two subdocuments are both fairly small, you can merge them into one subdocument –You can also remove a subdocument by incorporating its text into the master document

4 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial 10 4 Convert an existing document to a master document To convert an existing document to a master document: –Open the existing document –Click Tools on the menu bar, click AutoCorrect Options, click the AutoFormat As You Type tab –Click the Built-in Heading Styles check box –Click the OK button to close the AutoCorrect dialog box You can then switch to Outline view and click the Master Document View button to change to that view. Even though you are in Master Document View, the document is not really a master document until a subdocument is inserted.

5 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial 10 5 Insert or split a subdocument To insert a subdocument: –Move the insertion point to where you want the subdocument –Click the Insert Subdocument button on the Outlining toolbar, locate the document to insert, and click OK To split a subdocument: –Be sure you are in Master Document View –Move the insertion point to the subdocument heading where you want to divide the subdocument, and then click the Split Subdocument button on the Outlining toolbar

6 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial 10 6 An example of a master document with a subdocument

7 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial 10 7 Control text flow and page breaks You can insert hard page breaks to control where page breaks occur. However, this sometimes leads to additional problems if text is inserted or deleted in the vicinity of the hard page break. Word has other types of page break settings that can be used to avoid these problems and to control page breaks for text that has specific styles applied to it. These styles are used to avoid problems with creating widows, orphans and isolated headings. Controlling page breaks in this way improves the text flow of your document and ensures that the data appears as you want it to appear.

8 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial 10 8 Set page breaks for a heading style To control page breaks for a heading style so the heading stays with its associated text: –Click the Styles and Formatting button to open the Styles and Formatting Task Pane –Click the list arrow for a heading style, and click the Modify option –When the dialog box opens, click the Format button, and then click Paragraph –Click the Line and Page Breaks tab and insert a check mark in the Keep with text box –Click the OK button twice to close both dialog boxes This same technique can be used with other styles.

9 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial 10 9 The Paragraph dialog box

10 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial Use automatic heading numbers, numbered captions, and cross-references The Heading Numbering feature automatically names sections of a large document for you. This feature provides automatic sequential numbering, numbering across subdocuments, and provides a consistent style. Word also has a feature that allows you to insert numbered captions for pictures, charts, or other graphic objects to identify them by name. You can also create a cross-reference, which is a notation in a document that points the reader to another place in the document.

11 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial Apply automatic numbering to heading styles You can add automatic numbering to headings in the Bullets and Numbering dialog box, on the Outline Numbered tab. Click the Customize button to modify the styles shown. Once automatic heading numbers have been applied, as you scroll through your document, you will see that all headings have associated section numbers, making it easy to identify or refer to specific sections. If any headers are removed, altered or moved to a new location, Word will update the headings automatically.

12 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial The Bullets and Numbering dialog box

13 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial Add a numbered caption to an image Numbered captions make it easy to identify graphic images within a document. To add a numbered caption to a figure: –Select the figure and then click the Insert menu –Point to Reference, and then click Caption –Make sure that Figure is selected in the Label list box, and specify the position for the caption in the Position list box –Move the insertion point to the right of the caption number, press the spacebar and enter your caption Click OK to close the dialog box and insert the caption

14 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial An example of a numbered caption

15 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial Create a graph with Microsoft Graph Microsoft Graph is a tool you can use to insert bar, line and pie charts into Word documents. Select the type of chart you want and then modify or enter the chart information into a datasheet that will appear. –When Microsoft Graph starts, a default datasheet is supplied You can delete the information in the datasheet and reenter your own data. As you add data and labels to the datasheet, Microsoft Graph automatically creates the chart. You can move and resize the chart within the Word document, wrap text around it, and create a caption for the chart.

16 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial Insert a chart To insert a chart: –Move the insertion point where you want the chart to go –Click Insert on the menu bar, then click Object –When the dialog box opens, click the Create New tab, select Microsoft Graph Chart from the list, and then click OK –Click the Chart Type button's list arrow and select the type of chart you want from the list As you enter your data in place of the default data, Microsoft Graph will build the chart for you.

17 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial An example of a Microsoft Graph chart

18 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial Track revisions in a document Revision tracking allows you to view changes and comments in a document added by people reviewing the document. Word uses revision marks to denote these changes. Only changes that are made while revision tracking is turned on will be marked. You can ensure that this happens by protecting the document for tracked changes, which means no one can change the document unless you have revision tracking turned on. You can mark each person's edits using a different color.

19 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial Merge revisions and insert comments Once all revisions have been made, you can review all changes at one time, or review them by reviewer. Word allows you to accept or reject revisions individually. If you accept a revision, Word removes the revision mark but keeps the revision text. Word also allows you to save a document as a new version of an existing document, which allows you to preserve the original version in case you need to access it later. Reviewers can also insert comments, which are notes containing ideas that the reviewer thinks is relevant to the document.

20 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial Protect a document for tracking changes To protect a document so that no one can modify the document without tracking changes: –Open the document, click the Tools menu, and then click Protect Document –When the dialog box appears, click the Tracked changes option button to insert a check mark, and then click OK To turn on the track changes option you must display the Reviewing toolbar: –Click the View menu and then click Toolbars –Click the Reviewing toolbar name When you click the Track Changes button on the Reviewing toolbar, any modification made will be recorded.

21 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial The Reviewing toolbar

22 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial Protect a document with a digital signature A digital signature is an attachment to a file that vouches for the document's authenticity. It tells the person receiving the document that you wrote it, or reviewed it, and that the document is unaltered since you signed it. You can obtain a digital certificate from a certification authority, or you can create one using the SelfCert program. –Only digital certificates obtained from a certification authority are valid and reliable If you modify a digitally signed certificate in any way, Word will strip the digital signature from the document. You can also add your own digital signature to an already digitally signed document, indicating that you have opened and read the document.

23 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial Create certificates using SelfCert Although someone can create their own certificate using SelfCert, it does not guarantee the authenticity of the document. Only a certification authority certificate can be generally guaranteed to be reliable and safe. It is easy for anyone to forge a certificate using SelfCert. If you choose to use SelfCert, it is usually found in the Microsoft Office program folder, and you can locate it by clicking the Browse button on the Run menu dialog box.

24 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial A document that has been digitally signed

25 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial Use advanced page numbering techniques and style references For a document to be published as a book, you may want to include special page numbering techniques. The pages preceding the actual first page of text, such as title page, table of contents, etc., are usually numbered using lowercase Roman numerals, whereas the main text is numbered beginning with page 1, or possibly a section id and page number. You can also change the layout of the footer and even the page layout itself for odd and even pages.

26 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial Adjust margins and headers/footers for odd and even pages You can adjust the left and right margins and the page gutter depending on whether the page is odd or even. For the footers, you can control which side of the page the footer information prints on for odd or even pages. You can also insert a style reference into a footer. A style reference is a field code that inserts text formatted with a particular style at the location of the field code. You can do this to update the section name that appears in the footer when the section changes.

27 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial Set up a document in book format Most books are printed on both sides of the page, and then the pages are bound. Generally, when you open a book, the odd numbered pages appear on the right, the even numbered pages appear on the left. The gutter is the blank space between the pages where the pages are bound. Setting up odd and even page number layouts and footers helps to give a consistent look to the document.

28 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial An illustration of page layout

29 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial A document with page formatting applied

30 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial Create an index An index is a list of words and/or phrases and the page number(s) on which they appear. Creating an index manually can be very time consuming, but by using the Word Index feature much of it becomes automated. There are several methods that can be used to create the index, and which one you choose will depend on the requirements of the document you are working on. Word also makes it easy to create index subentries to further improve the usefulness of an index.

31 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial Insert an index One way to create an index is to have Word search for every occurrence of a word or a phrase. To do this: –Go to the beginning of the document and use Word's Find command to find the first occurrence of a word or phrase –When the first occurrence is found and selected, press the Alt+Shift+X keys to open the Mark Index Entry dialog box –The selected word will appear in the Main entry text box –Click the Current page option button –Click the Mark All button. Word will search the document and mark every occurrence of this word or phrase –Click the Close button to return to the document You can repeat this process for every word you want included in the index. Word will insert field codes for each index entry.

32 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial A document with index field codes

33 XP New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Word 2003 Tutorial Create a table of contents, and a table of figures Another useful feature for a large document is a table of contents. This is a list of major topics in the document and allows a reader to quickly locate a specific topic. Creating a table of contents is very similar to creating an index. You can also create a table of figures in a Word document, which lists the names and page numbers of any graphics, charts, or diagrams contained in the document.


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