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FIGURE 10.1 Typical physical appearance of a controller. Curtis Johnson Process Control Instrumentation Technology, 8e] Copyright ©2006 by Pearson Education,

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Presentation on theme: "FIGURE 10.1 Typical physical appearance of a controller. Curtis Johnson Process Control Instrumentation Technology, 8e] Copyright ©2006 by Pearson Education,"— Presentation transcript:

1 FIGURE 10.1 Typical physical appearance of a controller. Curtis Johnson Process Control Instrumentation Technology, 8e] Copyright ©2006 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

2 FIGURE 10.2 Error detection for systems using a floating power supply. Curtis Johnson Process Control Instrumentation Technology, 8e] Copyright ©2006 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

3 FIGURE 10.3 Error detector using a ground-based current and a differential amplifier. Curtis Johnson Process Control Instrumentation Technology, 8e] Copyright ©2006 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

4 FIGURE 10.4 A mercury switch on a bimetal strip is often used as a two-position temperature controller. Curtis Johnson Process Control Instrumentation Technology, 8e] Copyright ©2006 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

5 FIGURE 10.5 A two-position controller with neutral zone made from op amps and a comparator. Curtis Johnson Process Control Instrumentation Technology, 8e] Copyright ©2006 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

6 FIGURE 10.6 The circuit of FIGURE 10.5 shows the characteristic two-position response in terms of voltage. Curtis Johnson Process Control Instrumentation Technology, 8e] Copyright ©2006 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

7 FIGURE 10.7 An op amp proportional-mode controller. Curtis Johnson Process Control Instrumentation Technology, 8e] Copyright ©2006 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

8 FIGURE 10.8 An op amp integral-mode controller. Curtis Johnson Process Control Instrumentation Technology, 8e] Copyright ©2006 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

9 FIGURE 10.9 A practical derivative-mode op amp controller. Curtis Johnson Process Control Instrumentation Technology, 8e] Copyright ©2006 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

10 FIGURE An op amp proportional-integral (PI) mode controller. Curtis Johnson Process Control Instrumentation Technology, 8e] Copyright ©2006 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

11 FIGURE An op amp proportional-derivative (PD) mode controller. Curtis Johnson Process Control Instrumentation Technology, 8e] Copyright ©2006 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

12 FIGURE Direct implementation of a three-mode (PID) controller with op amps. Circuits with fewer op amps are often used. Curtis Johnson Process Control Instrumentation Technology, 8e] Copyright ©2006 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

13 FIGURE The pneumatic proportional-mode controller. Curtis Johnson Process Control Instrumentation Technology, 8e] Copyright ©2006 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

14 FIGURE Pneumatic proportional-integral controller. Curtis Johnson Process Control Instrumentation Technology, 8e] Copyright ©2006 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

15 FIGURE Pneumatic proportional-derivative controller. Curtis Johnson Process Control Instrumentation Technology, 8e] Copyright ©2006 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

16 FIGURE Pneumatic three-mode (PID) controller. Curtis Johnson Process Control Instrumentation Technology, 8e] Copyright ©2006 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

17 FIGURE Circuit for Example Curtis Johnson Process Control Instrumentation Technology, 8e] Copyright ©2006 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

18 FIGURE Circuit for Example Curtis Johnson Process Control Instrumentation Technology, 8e] Copyright ©2006 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

19 FIGURE Circuit for Example Curtis Johnson Process Control Instrumentation Technology, 8e] Copyright ©2006 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

20 FIGURE System for Problem Curtis Johnson Process Control Instrumentation Technology, 8e] Copyright ©2006 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

21 FIGURE System for Problem S10.1. Curtis Johnson Process Control Instrumentation Technology, 8e] Copyright ©2006 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

22 FIGURE Nozzle/flapper characteristic for Problem S10.2. Curtis Johnson Process Control Instrumentation Technology, 8e] Copyright ©2006 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.


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