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1. 2 The family tree CEPT (1959) EC Green Paper (1987) MoU January 1988 ETSI, March 88.

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Presentation on theme: "1. 2 The family tree CEPT (1959) EC Green Paper (1987) MoU January 1988 ETSI, March 88."— Presentation transcript:

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2 2 The family tree CEPT (1959) EC Green Paper (1987) MoU January 1988 ETSI, March 88

3 3 Who is who in Europe? EU (25)Regulatory framework CEPT (43)Frequency issues ETSI (55)ICT Standards

4 4 ETSI Not-for-profit organization created in 1988 A recognized European standards organization Setting globally applicable standards for telecommunications and ICT radiocommunications broadcasting Direct participation More than 14,000 publications – Freely available on the web

5 5 ETSI today Wireline, wireless, NGN, VoIP, QoS, Security, Satellite comms, Digital TV and radio, Interoperability testing, accessibility etc. 26 Technical bodies (125+ working groups) 2 Partnership Projects (22 working groups) 21M budget/contribution EC/EFTA 15% Brand image: «one of the best in class » A track record of industrial successes worldwide 3GPP & MESA

6 6 ETSI: A Standardization Success Story ETSI since its establishment in 1988 has established itself in a relatively short time as a premier multinational SDO ETSI has flourished as deregulation took hold and as the European Community expanded, increasing the importance of standardized cross borders solutions ETSI success is based on attracting new Members and developing high quality standards that –enable interoperability –encourage innovation, open up new markets –create trust and confidence in products –bring down costs and increases competition –avoid duplication of effort

7 7 Membership by Category (Jan. 2005) Users 5%5% Administrations 10% Network Operators 15% Service Providers & Others 19% Manufacturers 51%51%

8 8 Fora / Consortia Fora / Consortia ETSIs relations with ITU, IEC & ISO and other standards bodies ITU-T ITU-R JTC1 GSC IEEE IPv6 Forum GSM Association DVB Project EBU Parlay IMTC WIMAX forum TETRA MoU ICANN & 50+ others International bodies Interregional Co-operation CENELEC CEN

9 9 Global Standards Collaboration Interregional collaboration on selected standardization subjects between ISACC (Canada) T1 Committee (USA) TIA (USA) ITU (International) TTC (Japan) TTA (Korea) ACIF (Australia) ARIB (Japan)

10 10 Standards are a key variable in leveling the playing field Standards facilitate a multi-supplier environment thereby providing for –competitive pricing of equipment –more robust and assured supply channels –innovation in order to differentiate product and to retain customers Standards enable the development of profitable industrial ecosystems Increase the likelihood of interoperability in a multi-equipment provider and in a multi-service provider environment

11 11 Standards and service creation Standards facilitate a multi-service provider environment thereby providing for competitive pricing of services interchangeable end user terminal equipment Standardized solutions in the lower and middle layers enable the development of value added services and applications This is highly critical in regions where local manufacturing industry cannot compete on a global scale (yet) the service industry is highly creative and competitive there is a strong political push to rely on ICT and education to develop.

12 12 In case you think standardizers are idealists Up to 80% of trade (4 trillion USD per annum) is affected by standards or associated technical regulations. (OECD) ICT sector is a 650billion USD per annum global industry, the largest sector in the world, accounting for more than 2% of world GDP and representing nearly 20% of world trade. (lirne.net)

13 13 Standards allow different entities to create technically compatible equipment and services. It should be noted that interoperability requires more than mere technical compatibility. However, without standards neither compatibility nor interoperability would be possible. About Interoperability and Standards Report of the High Level Group on DRM, July 04

14 14 INDEED, SOCIETY, USERS, WE ARE NOT INTERESTED IN STANDARDS! THE ONLY THING THAT COUNTS: HOW TO MAKE BEST USE OF STANDARDS TO BUILD SERVICES AND APPLICATIONS THAT WILL BEST SERVE USERS AND MARKETS INTERESTS

15 15 WE USERS WANT TO PLUG AND PLAY! WE WANT, NEED, INSIST IN INTEROPERABILITY!

16 16 Fragmentation of standards making market and usage driven standardization (e.g. e-gov) huge consequences on Interoperability End to end monolithic standards are behind us Complex value chains Service platform approach with multiple horizontal layers Standard & non-standard building blocks for platforms

17 17 Therefore The very meaning of interoperability evolves with stakeholders and markets needs: From specifying end to end systems to a logic of building blocks From standardizing interfaces a priori to addressing interoperability of components a posteriori Very hot topic on ETSIs strategic agenda

18 18 Objectives Create a Europe/Latin America think thank on specifications and Interoperability profiles for e-government applications Policies Technology strategies Enable the development of joint deliverables (strategic and/or technical)

19 19 Objectives of the meeting Get to know each other better Explore common possible strategies and projects Highlight areas of common interest Select (technical) topics for potential ccoperation Identify methods for cooperation Start elaborating a roadmap

20 20 Agenda-day 1

21 21 Agenda-day 2

22 22 Gracias, Obrigado, Thank you Karl Heinz Rosenbrock


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