Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Teaching Scientist Volunteers about K-12 Science Education, Pedagogy, and Partnership University of California San Francisco Science & Health Education.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Teaching Scientist Volunteers about K-12 Science Education, Pedagogy, and Partnership University of California San Francisco Science & Health Education."— Presentation transcript:

1 Teaching Scientist Volunteers about K-12 Science Education, Pedagogy, and Partnership University of California San Francisco Science & Health Education Partnership (SEP) Patricia S. Caldera & Jean MacCormack &

2 Who are we? SEP Founded by Bruce Alberts and David Ramsey in 1987 Scientist volunteers Graduate and health professional students, postdocs, research specialists, and staff SFUSD 120 schools K-12 57,000 students Mission: To promote partnership between scientists and educators in support of high quality science education for all K-12 students

3 SEP Participation 60 Partnership Teams 108 Classrooms with scientists 15,000 Students 400 Teachers 200 UCSF Volunteers 20 High School Interns 90% of SFUSD Schools

4 Why Teaching Workshops? Lesson observations - Lecture/demonstration - Few students actively involved - Inappropriate level - Over ambitious Initiated in 1996

5 Things to consider when Teaching Besides choosing a subject... Who are the students? What do they already know about the subject? How can all students be engaged? How do I know what they have learned? My favorite science lesson was all of them.

6 Who are the students? Visit to Classroom Teacher Partner Rely on your teacher partner!

7 Cognitive Development a cell Piaget Concrete vs Abstract 7-11year olds think mostly in the concrete (3rd - 6th grade) year olds can start thinking in the abstract (7th grade) Use of models Models of what we cannot see Size of models 3D drawings Sections/maps or a doughnut

8 What do they already know about the subject? Pre-Assessment Protein What comes to mind when you hear the word protein? How is this object like a protein? How is this object not like a protein?

9 How can all students be engaged? Lesson Plan Teaching Strategies

10 Anatomy of a Lesson Plan Learning Goals –Content goals –Process goals –Inquiry Assessment of Student Learning –What do they already know? –What did they learn? Teaching Strategies –What will the students be doing? Materials Management –Materials for all Time Management –How much time is there? Classroom & Student Management –Expect the unexpected

11 Strategies for Engaging All Students Give all students an opportunity to... talk about science Brainstorm, practice wait-time, reporting from small groups, encourage students voices, many responses to a question handle materials Have available enough materials, hands-on activities, work in small groups

12 Strategies for Engaging All Students think on their own Wait-time, open-ended questions, time to write, think- pair-share practice science for themselves Keep your hands in your pockets, answer questions with questions

13 How else can students practice science for themselves? Essential features of inquiry –Levels of inquiry Exploring student questions –Investigable questions

14 Essential Features of Inquiry Engages in scientifically oriented questions Gives priority to evidence in responding to the question Uses evidence to develop an explanation Connects explanations to scientific knowledge Communicates and justifies explanation Reference: Inquiry and the National Education Standards National Academy of Sciences (NRC 2000, p. 29)

15 Who makes the decisions? Teacher or Student Posing a question How can the question be answered? Design a test Is it a fair test? Data collection Does it make sense? Share and discuss results

16 What did the students learn? Assessment –Wrap-up –Test –Science Journal As a volunteer/teacher what did I learn? –How did the lesson go?

17 Acknowledgements Patricia Caldera, Liesl Chatman, Jennifer Chu, Margaret Clark, Helen Doyle, Andrew Grillo-Hill, Sabine Jeske, Jean MacCormack, Katherine Nielsen, Steve Ribisi, Claudia Scharff, Marcelle Siegel, Rebecca Smith, Tracy Stevens, Erin Strauss, Elisa Stone and Kimberly Tanner This project was previously funded by the National Science Foundation and is currently funded by the National Center for Research Resources at the National Institutes of Health (Grant No 5R25RR )

18 What participants said... In the past I think Ive focused mostly on making a memorable/flashy demonstration and then using the kids curiosity to propel the lesson, with me asking the leading questions to guide them to the right answer. I had never thought of letting the kids come up with their own questions. The anatomy of a lesson plan was significant to me because I have not had any experience in devising a lesson and wasnt sure where to begin.


Download ppt "Teaching Scientist Volunteers about K-12 Science Education, Pedagogy, and Partnership University of California San Francisco Science & Health Education."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google