Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Connecting Completion and Quality for Student Success in a Global Society Network for Academic Renewal Conference Student Success and the Quality Agenda.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Connecting Completion and Quality for Student Success in a Global Society Network for Academic Renewal Conference Student Success and the Quality Agenda."— Presentation transcript:

1 Connecting Completion and Quality for Student Success in a Global Society Network for Academic Renewal Conference Student Success and the Quality Agenda April 4, 2013 Carol Geary Schneider

2 Overview What High Quality Means – and Why It Matters The Mounting Evidence of a Quality Shortfall The Best Policy Priorities – for Completion AND Quality –High Effort, High Impact Practices –Purposeful, Practice-Rich Educational Pathways

3 Student Success and Quality – Two National Priorities Underserved Student Success – Dramatically Expanding Access and Completion –Markers of Progress Toward Completion: Enrollment, Persistence, Transfer, Timely Degree Completion – Credit Hours

4 Student Success and Quality – Two National Priorities (cont). American Capability – Global Positioning for the U.S. and American Learners –Markers of Progress: Students Demonstrated Achievement of Learning Outcomes Needed for Success

5 Our Challenge Merging the Two Priorities Creating a Guiding Commitment to Access AND Achievement Completion with Demonstrated Achievement –Mapping Purposeful Pathways for Completion and Quality

6 Quality Continued: What Knowledge and Skills are Needed for Success? Preparation for a Fast-Paced Economy – and for Multiple Jobs Over Time Preparation for Knowledgeable Citizenship Preparation to Make a Life – of Meaning and Purpose

7 Focusing ONLY on the Economy – Heres What Employers Say How Should Colleges Prepare Students to Succeed in Todays Economy? (2007) How Should Colleges Assess And Improve Student Learning? Employers Views on the Accountability Challenge (2008) Raising the Bar: Employers Views on College Learning in the Wake of the Economic Downturn (2010) *For full reports on these surveys and related employer findings, see

8 It Takes More Than a Major: Employer Priorities for College Learning and Student Success (AAC&U and Hart Research Associates, Forthcoming April 10, 2013)

9 College Learning for the 21 st Century Economy Employers are demanding more – much more They want and seek many more university- educated workers They also seek much higher and broader levels of learning in those they employ, retain, and promote

10 Employers Are Raising the Bar 93% of employers say that they are asking employees to take on more responsibilities and to use a broader set of skills than in the past 91% of employers say that the challenges their employees face are more complex than they were in the past. 93% of employers agree that to succeed in their companies, employees needs higher levels of learning and knowledge than they did in the past. Source: It Takes More Than a Major: Employer Priorities for College Learning and Student Success (AAC&U and Hart Research Associates, Forthcoming 2013)

11 The Growing Demand for Higher Order Skills Source: Council on Competitiveness, Competitiveness Index

12 Economic Pressures: Innovation and Measured Risk-Taking In a globalized knowledge economy, the capacity to drive INNOVATION is the key strategic advantage

13 To Drive Innovation, Employers Seek Employees Who Can Think Outside the Box

14 Nearly 2/3s of Employers Think that Todays Graduates Need Both Broad Learning AND In-Depth Learning Preparation for a Specific Job or Field is NOT Enough

15 The Four Things Employers Want Breadth as Well as Depth – Big Picture Thinking as Well as Learning Related to Jobs High Level Skills – 21 st Century Skills Necessary to Innovation A Proactive Sense of Responsibility – Whether and Why, Not Just How Adaptive and Applied Learning – The Ability to Get Things Done

16 Employers Do Not Want People Who Are Locked Into Mental Cubicles – Because They Cant Adapt to Challenges and Change

17 Employers Do Want Graduates Who Possess 21 st Century Skills, Including Ethical Responsibility and Intercultural Competence – and Democracy Needs These Skills Too

18 So if these are the Goals, How Are Students Doing?

19 The Preponderance of the Evidence Shows that the U.S. has a Quality Problem, Not Just a Completion Problem

20 Underachievement Arum/Roksa study: Academically Adrift Bok, Our Underachieving Colleges (2006) Blaich/Wabash Longitudinal Studies ACT/ETS Studies – 8-10% of seniors are proficient in key skills Faculty Members Own Reports Numerous studies should that that too many students are not doing their best and make very limited gains in college.

21 Making Progress? What We Know About the Achievement of Liberal Education Outcomes by Ashley Finley (AAC&U, 2012)

22 From Making Progress? …for six of the eleven learning outcomes measured by the Wabash study, the majority of students showed either no growth or a decline over four years. – page 8

23 From Making Progress? ETS Proficiency ProfileSeniors Critical Thinking8% Proficient 72% Not Proficient Writing9% Proficient 64% Not Proficient ACT CAAP Test – Seniors Scores declined slightly from 2004 to 2010 on measures of Math, Critical Thinking, and Writing

24 Why is There a Quality Problem? A Mini-Case: Introduction to Micro-Economics: –Large evening lecture – one 3-hour meeting –No sections –No homework –No mathematics –Two multiple choice mid-terms –One multiple choice final exam Source: Chronicle of Higher Education, June 18, 2012

25 The Best Policy Priorities – for Completion AND Quality High Impact, High Effort Educational Practices Purposeful, Practice-Rich Educational Pathways from First to Final Year

26 High Impact Practices First-Year Seminars and Experiences Common Intellectual Experiences Learning Communities Writing-Intensive Courses Collaborative Assignments and Projects Science as Science Is Done/Undergraduate Research Diversity/Global Learning Service Learning, Community-Based Learning Internships Capstone Courses and Projects

27 High Impact Practices Correlate with Increased Completion Correlate with Higher Levels of Learning Outcomes

28 Five High-Impact Practices: Research on Learning Outcomes, Completion, and Quality Jayne E. Brownell Lynn E. Swaner (AAC&U, 2010)

29 Why Do the HIPs Work? Create Engaged and Supportive Community Involve Students in Purposeful Learning Connect Learning with Larger Questions and Real-World Settings Require Higher Order Inquiry, Exploration and Problem-Solving Engage Diversity as a Resource for Learning

30 In Tackling Underachievement, Intentionality is Central and Students Engaged Practice is the Key to Developing and Demonstrating Essential Learning Outcomes

31 Using New Tools to Design Purposeful Pathways

32 Touchstones for Quality Mapping Essential Competencies Across Programs of Study High Impact Practices – Ensuring Students Practice of Essential Competencies Integrating Practices That work for Persistence INTO Programs of Study Portable Portfolios – Students Working on Key Competencies Across Multiple Levels and Sites

33 There is a Lot of New Evidence About Practices that Work to Support Completion AND Quality

34 Our Responsibility is to Put the New Evidence to Work in Purposeful Designs for More Educationally Productive Programs and Policies


Download ppt "Connecting Completion and Quality for Student Success in a Global Society Network for Academic Renewal Conference Student Success and the Quality Agenda."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google