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High Focus, High Impact: Charting Intentional Pathways for New Student Success AAC&U Institute on High-Impact Practices and Student Success Burlington,

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Presentation on theme: "High Focus, High Impact: Charting Intentional Pathways for New Student Success AAC&U Institute on High-Impact Practices and Student Success Burlington,"— Presentation transcript:

1 High Focus, High Impact: Charting Intentional Pathways for New Student Success AAC&U Institute on High-Impact Practices and Student Success Burlington, Vermont June 14, 2011 Carol Geary Schneider

2 A Guiding Vision for Inclusive Excellence and Student Success Contemporary Compelling Transparent Achieved

3 Two National Dialogues about Student Learning in College Underserved Student Success – U.S. Success American Capability

4 Our Challenge: Merging the Two Dialogues Creating a Compelling Guiding Vision Fulfilling the Promise Even in the Midst of Economic Contraction

5 The National Dialogue on Student Success – U.S. Success Economic need for higher levels of skill and knowledge But the U.S. has lost its international leadership in college completion Most of our growth in enrollment comes from underserved communities

6 Bachelors Degree Attainment by Race Source: U.S. Department of Education, The Condition of Education Postsecondary Education Opportunity, no. 158 (2005) Twenty-Five to Twenty-Nine Year Olds

7 Bachelors Degree Attainment by Family Income Source: U.S. Department of Education, The Condition of Education Postsecondary Education Opportunity, no. 158 (2005) 8.6%

8 Markers of Student Success Enrollment Persistence Successful Transfer Degree Completion

9 The Emerging Dialogue on American Capability Three Locations: On Campus Employers AAC&U – Connecting Educators and Employers Lumina Foundation – The Degree Qualifications Profile

10 The World Itself is Demanding More… Disruptive Global and Social Change Diversity as a Daily Reality Epochal Choices Facing U.S. Citizens –e.g., Sustainability, Inequality, Energy, Education Ethical Dilemmas and Decisions

11 Productivity Is Now Tied to Learning… Half Life of Industries, Companies, Jobs, and Skills Decreasing Today's Students Will Have Jobs by the Time They Are 38 50% of Workers Have Been With Their Company Less Than 5 Years –25% Less than 1 Year Breadth, Depth, & Applications of Academic Preparation Are Expanding DOL-BLS

12 The Growing Demand for Higher Order Skills Source: Council on Competitiveness, Competitiveness Index

13 Employers Are Raising the Bar 91% of employers say that they are asking employees to take on more responsibilities and to use a broader set of skills than in the past 90% of employers say that their employees are expected to work harder to coordinate with other departments than in the past. 88% of employers say that the challenges their employees face are more complex than they were in the past. 88% of employers agree that to succeed in their companies, employees need higher levels of learning and knowledge than they did in the past Source: Raising the Bar: Employers Views on College Learning in the Wake of the Economic Downturn (AAC&U and Hart Research Associates, 2010)

14 Key Capabilities Open the Door for Career Success and Earnings Irrespective of college major or institutional selectivity, what matters to career success is students development of a broad set of cross- cutting capacities… Anthony Carnevale, Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce

15 – Greater Expectations A National Dialogue About Goals and Effective Practices in College Learning – Liberal Education and Americas Promise (LEAP) A Ten-Year Effort to Make Excellence Inclusive Preparing Students for Twenty-First Century Realities

16 The National Discussion About the Quality of Learningand Whether Students Are Actually Prepared for These New RealitiesIs Accelerating LEAP Frames That Dialogue

17 The Essential Aims and Outcomes Knowledge of Human Cultures and the Physical and Natural World Intellectual and Practical Skills Personal and Social Responsibility Integrative Learning Liberal Education is the Key to American Capability

18 Markers of Liberal Education and American Capability Evidence that Students Can Apply the Essential Learning Outcomes to Complex, Unscripted Problems – and Real-World Settings

19 How Well Are Graduates Achieving the Essential Learning Outcomes?

20 20 Employers Evaluate College Graduates Preparedness In Key Areas Teamwork Ethical judgment Intercultural skills Social responsibility Quantitative reasoning Oral communication Self-knowledge Adaptability Critical thinking Writing Self-direction Global knowledge Mean rating* *ratings on 10-point scale: 10 = recent college graduates are extremely well prepared on each quality to succeed in entry level positions or be promoted/advance within the company Very well prepared (8-10 ratings)* 39% 38% 35% 32% 30% 28% 24% 22% 26% 23% 18% Not well prepared (1-5 ratings)* 17% 19% 21% 23% 26% 30% 31% 37% 42% 46%

21 Global Knowledge and Skills -Less than 13% of college students achieve basic competence in a language other than English -Less than 34% of college students earn credit for an international studies class; of those who do, only 13% take more than four classes -Less than 10% of college students participate in study abroad programs -Between 5 and 10% of college students meet all criteria for global competence Clifford Adelman, Global Preparedness of Pre-9/11 College Graduates: what the US Longitudinal Studies Say, Tertiary Education and Management 10 (2004): 243

22 Knowledge in the Arts and Sciences First-generation students take fewer courses than others in mathematics, science, social studies, humanities, history, foreign languages, or computer science. From National Center for Education Statistics, First-Generation Students in Postsecondary Education: A Look at Their College Transcripts. (Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, 2005).

23 ETS Reports the Following on Intellectual Skills: Seniors proficient in critical thinking 8% Seniors proficient at level 3 writing 10% Seniors proficient at level 3 math 10%

24 NSSE 2009 Reports on Personal and Social Responsibility Limited*Gains: Understanding people of other racial and ethnic backgrounds43% Developing a personal code of values and ethics: 40% Contributing to the welfare of your community50% * Some/very little

25 Findings from Academically Adrift 45% of students did not demonstrate significant improvement in their writing or critical thinking skills during their first two years of college (based on CLA results) 36% of students did not significantly improve on these outcomes over 4 years of college Half of all students report taking five or fewer courses requiring 20 pages of writing in the previous semester On average, students spend only about hours per week studying – not 2 or 3 hours for each hour in class Findings of limited learning gains replicated in Wabash Center study (using CAAP-CT scores) Sources: Arum, Richard, and Josipa Roksa Academically Adrift (SSRC, 2010); Arum, Richard, Jospia Roksa, and Esther Cho, Improving Undergraduate Learning: Findings and Policy Recommendations from the SSRC-CLA Longitudinal Project, (SSRC, 2010); Pascarella, Ernest T., Charles Blaich, et al. How Robust are the Findings of Academically Adrift, Change (Taylor and Francis, May/June 2011).

26 Additional Findings from Academically Adrift Those scoring in the top 10% (more than 1.5 standard deviation growth) on CLA include students from all backgrounds and students from a wide array of institutions When students report that their faculty have high expectations, students learn more – as measured by CLA score gains. When students take courses that require more reading and writing, students learn more – as measured by CLA score gains. Students focusing their studies in humanities/social science and science/math courses learn more – as measured by CLA score gains. Sources: Arum, Richard, and Josipa Roksa Academically Adrift (SSRC, 2010); Arum, Richard, Jospia Roksa, and Esther Cho, Improving Undergraduate Learning: Findings and Policy Recommendations from the SSRC-CLA Longitudinal Project, (SSRC, 2010); Pascarella, Ernest T., Charles Blaich, et al. How Robust are the Findings of Academically Adrift, Change (Taylor and Francis, May/June 2011).

27 The Essential Aims and Outcomes Knowledge of Human Cultures and the Physical and Natural World Intellectual and Practical Skills Personal and Social Responsibility Integrative Learning Liberal Education is the Key to American Capability

28 Our Challenge Merging the Two Dialogues Creating a Compelling Vision that Makes Inclusive Excellence the Key to Student Success

29 Supporting Student Success and Inclusive Excellence Access/Persistence The Essential Learning Outcomes High Impact Practices Accountability for Assessments That Focus and Deepen Essential Learning

30 High Impact Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter by George D. Kuh (LEAP report, October 2008,

31 The Crucial Role of High-Impact Educational Practices First-Year Seminars and Experiences Common Intellectual Experiences Learning Communities Writing-Intensive Courses Collaborative Assignments and Projects Science as Science Is Done/Undergraduate Research Diversity/Global Learning Service Learning, Community-Based Learning Internships Capstone Courses and Projects

32 Impact of Educationally Purposeful Practices on the Probability of Returning for the Second Year of College by Race **From Kuh, High Impact Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter (AAC&U, 2008)

33 Impact of Educationally Purposeful Practices on First Academic Year GPA by Pre-College Achievement Level *From Kuh, High Impact Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter (AAC&U, 2008)

34 Impact of Educationally Purposeful Practices on First Academic Year GPA by Race/Ethnicity **From Kuh, High Impact Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter (AAC&U, 2008)

35 38% 54% 48% 63% 65% 68% 73% 69% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0% 70.0% 80.0% Latina/o RespondentsOther Respondents Percentage Graduating "On Time" (i.e., in ) None1 HIP2 HIPs3 or more HIPs [ V =.109 (.094)] [ V =.255 (.007)] Impact of Participation in High-Impact Practices on Percentage of Senior NSSE Respondents Graduating on Time, by Racial and Ethnic Background Source: Does Participation in Multiple High Impact Practices Affect Student Success at Cal State Northridge? by Bettina Huber (unpublished paper, 2010).

36 Do High-Impact Practices Foster Essential Learning Outcomes?

37 Five High-Impact Practices: Research on Learning Outcomes, Completion, and Quality Lynn Swaner and Jayne Brownell (AAC&U, 2010)

38 The Good News High Impact Practices Do Foster Gains on Essential Learning Outcomes

39 Practices that Put Students Learning at the Center High Engagement (Peers, Mentors, Unscripted Questions) High Effort (by Students) High Reward (for Learning)

40 Mixed News Participation rates (%) for seniors in selected HIPs by race Source: Assessment of High- Impact Practices: Using Findings to Drive Change in the Compass Project, by Ashley Finley, Spring 2011 forthcoming issue, Peer Review

41 Charting Intentional Pathways for Student Success

42 Give Students a Compass and Roadmap – and Educators Too SHARED Responsibility for Essential Learning Outcomes New Focus on Practices that Foster Persistence AND Learning

43 Scaffold High Impact/High Effort Practices Across the Curriculum Thematic Learning Communities Collaborative Projects Undergraduate Research Community-Based Learning Internships – Supervised and Evaluated Senior Projects

44 Engage the Departments General Education – Necessary But Not Sufficient Every Major Plays a Crucial Role in Students Achievement of the Essential Learning Outcomes

45 Map the Pathways from Two-Year to Four- Year Study

46

47 The Lumina Degree Profile – in Brief – Provides a Template of Competencies Required for the Award of Degrees

48 Lumina Degree Profile Three Degree Levels: Associate, Bachelors, and Masters Framed as Successively Inclusive Hierarchies of Action Verbs to Describe Outcomes at Each Degree Level Intended as a Beta Version, for Testing, Experimentation, and Further Development Beginning This Year

49 Organization of the Degree Profile Five areas of learning Specialized knowledge Broad, integrative knowledge Intellectual Skills Applied Learning Civic Learning

50 Across All These Areas and Levels Students Actual Work Becomes the Focus of Educational Attention

51 The Degree Profile Shifts Our Collective Attention to What Students Actually Do: Research, Projects, Papers, Performances, Creative Work… Applied Learning!

52 The Degree Profile Invites Faculty and Staff to Focus on… Intentional Assignments that Develop Competence Integrative Milestone Performances that Provide Evidence of Competence and of Students Ability to Tackle Complex Questions and Problems

53 When the Curriculum is Focused, Assessment Can Draw from High Impact Practices For example: the papers, projects, exhibits, research, internships, capstones, etc. that the Degree Profile emphasizes

54 The Proof is in the Portfolio – and Institutions That Are Rich in High Impact Practices Are Poised to Lead the Way

55 In Sum: Students Need to Know the Outcomes the Degree Represents – and Why They Matter

56 Students Also Need to Know that Their Best Work is Expected And Their Actual Work is the Most Important Evidence We Have About Whether They Can Integrate and Apply Their Knowledge to New Contexts and New Challenges

57 An Accountability Framework Worthy of Our Mission Shared Goals – That Build American Capability High Impact Practices that Support Essential Learning Outcomes and Completion Disaggregated Data – That Shine a Light on Underserved Students Progress and Achievement Students Best Work – Sampled and Synthesized For Public Reporting

58 Campus-Wide Commitment – and Capacity – to Use Our Evidence to Support Essential Learning And Inclusive Excellence

59 This is Our Crossroads Moment… Making Excellence Inclusive is Fundamental to Our Future


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