Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Beyond Yellow Ribbons: How Prepared are Veterans with Disabilities and Employers to Participate in a Disability Inclusive Workforce? Hannah Rudstam, Ph.D.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Beyond Yellow Ribbons: How Prepared are Veterans with Disabilities and Employers to Participate in a Disability Inclusive Workforce? Hannah Rudstam, Ph.D."— Presentation transcript:

1 Beyond Yellow Ribbons: How Prepared are Veterans with Disabilities and Employers to Participate in a Disability Inclusive Workforce? Hannah Rudstam, Ph.D. Northeast ADA Center (DBTACNE) Wendy Strobel Gower, Project Director, Northeast ADA Center (DBTACNE) Jamie Streeter Wilson, MA Candidate, Cornell University

2 The Northeast ADA Center Offering training, consulting, and technical assistance A resource…

3 Overview Why is this a burning issue? The nature of veterans disabilities The Employers Study The Veterans Study Implications: Policy, practice and research ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

4 Why is this a burning issue? A 30 year old veteran returns from Iraq with PTSD. A middle school teacher prior to his service in Iraq, he now plans on limiting his job search to non-skilled work because he is sure he will never be hired for professional jobs when he tells his potential employer about his PTSD diagnosis. A 24 year old soldier is recovering from a traumatic brain injury. She plans on hiding her disability from her employer because she fears she will be terminated if her employer finds out. A 32 year old returns from Iraq with a spinal cord injury. An IT professional prior to his service, he believes he will not be able to return to his old job because the building he worked in lacks an elevator. ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

5 Why is this a burning issue? For these veterans (and many others like them), will goodwill be enough? What else needs to happen? ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

6 Why is this a burning issue? To a large degree, veterans workplace issues are disability workplace issues Since 2001, about 1.64 million U.S. troops have been deployed for Operations in Iraq and Afghanistan According to the U.S. Census Bureau (American Community Survey 2009): 21.9 million veterans in million of these veterans were in the workforce 5.5 million veterans had a diagnosed disability ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

7 Yet, the real rate of disability among veterans is likely substantially higher Signature Disabilities: PTSD, TBI and depression PTSD: –2008 RAND study: About 20 % of recently returned veterans screened positive for depression or PTSD –Erbes, Westermeyer, Engdahl & Johnson (2007): Rate of PTSD among returning service members was 6 % diagnosed, with an additional 27% estimated to be undiagnosed TBI –2008 RAND study: 19% of soldiers received a probable TBI, with more subtle (and more difficult to diagnose) blast-related injuries being the most common Many veterans have more than one disability 30% of returning veterans screened positive for PTSD, TBI and/or major depression (RAND, 2008)

8 Overview: Disability rates & types DOD rates across OIF, OEF & OND* Total casualties: 41,675 Largest reason code: WEAPONRY, EXPLOSIVE DEVICE 29,789 *US Department of Defense (DoD) Personnel and Procurement Statistics at ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

9 Returning veterans… Arguably, the number of veterans with non- obvious disabilities far exceeds those with obvious disabilities The two signature disabilities for Iraq and Afghanistan veterans are: 1.Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) 2.Traumatic brain injury (TBI)

10 The nature of veterans disabilities Iraq and Afghanistan vets have higher rates of signature disabilities (Williams & Mulhall, 2009) Nature of weaponryTBI closed-head blast injuries from roadside bombs and mortar attacks More vulnerable to PTSD because of street, hand-to- hand fighting and snipers More likely to have repeated deployments Not as likely to have recommended rest period between deployments Recruited from National Guard and Reservistsmay lack the sense of shared community of enlistees

11 The special dynamic of these signature veterans disabilities… Veteran is likely still on a journey to understand the impact and meaning of the disability AFTER the return to civilian work life Under-diagnosed & under-reportedInadequate screening mechanisms Many will not be fully diagnosed & treated until long after return to civilian life Change a lot over time Can have a wide range of symptoms and subtle manifestations Tend to be highly stigmatized

12 About PTSD… Three major categories of diagnostic criteria* 1.Re-experiencing Symptoms –Uncontrollable flashbacks –Nightmares 2.Avoidance Symptoms –Withdrawing from others –Loss of interest in life activities 3.Hyper-arousal –Sleep problems –Unexplained anger –Difficulty concentrating Symptoms can creep up –not necessarily present immediately after the event *4th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (or DSM-IV).Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (or DSM-IV)

13 About TBI… A leading cause is blast injuries, ranging from life threatening to mild/undetected Our screening systems for TBI are probably inadequate A very complex injury, with subtle symptoms: –Sleep problems –Impaired memory –Poor concentration/attention –Depression –Anxiety –Irritability/mood changes –Headache/dizziness –Fatigue –Noise/light intolerance –Ringing in the ears (tinnitus) –Vision change: blurred or vision

14 And what does this mean in the workplace? Many veterans may still be on a journey to understand the meaning of working with a disability long after they return to civilian work life Their conditions & treatment plans may still be in the process of adjustment well into their civilian work lives No one size fits all. Course of recovery and employment needs is different for each individual If workplaces are not disability inclusive, they are not welcoming to returning vets--Disability inclusiveness is the knot that holds together the yellow ribbon ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

15 Symptoms and accommodation options for PTSD and TBI often overlap: Interacting with co-workers or supervisor: Alternative communication systems Work at home option (can be part time) Clarity expectations and give positive coaching/feedback Assign feedback partner Sleep disturbances: Provide consistent schedule Combine short breaks into a long break for a nap Fine motor skills issues: Alternative input devices for computer Speech to text software Ergonomic phones, desks and office equipment Large motor skills issues: Universal design Basics of accessibility

16 Main laws that apply to veterans with disabilities in the workplace USERRA FMLA ADA

17 USERRA (Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act) Enforced by US DOL Protects civilian jobs of service members called to military duty Retains employment rights for five years Has some disability protections for service-acquired disabilities--right to reasonable accommodation Must be re-employed in the job they would have attained had they not been in service Guaranteed same seniority, rights and benefits Employer must train/re-train service member to attain the escalated job

18 FMLA New military family leave entitlements2009 Family members of service members can take up to 26 workweeks leave to care for service member with a disability Family members of National Guard may use 12 weeks FMLA leave to arrange family affairs of active duty service member

19 ADA VWDs protected in same way anyone else with a disability is. –Not automatically protected –Independent of military benefits disability rating HiringRight to an accommodation during hiring process itself HiringRight to disclosure as a choice AccommodationRight to an accommodation Other work processesRight to have equal access to training, development, coaching, equal compensation, promotion, etc. Right to an accessible workplace EEOC (2009) Veterans with Service-Connected Disabilities and the Americans with Disabilities Act: A Guide for Employers.

20 Two studies: Are we ready for a workplace that includes veterans with disabilities? Study #1. Employer Study Study #2. The Veterans Study

21 An overview of each study Study #1. Employer Study Northeast ADA Center & ADA Center Network in collaboration with National Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM) Builds upon a prior SHRM study on HR professionals attitudes about veterans Question: Do HR professionals have the knowledge, beliefs/willingness and practices in place to be effective in hiring, accommodating and retaining veterans with disabilities?

22 An overview of each study Study #2. Veterans Study Northeast ADA Center in collaboration with Kessler Foundation and Tip of the Arrow Program Veterans are being prepared in terms of medical, training and vocational preparation. But what about their rights as people with disabilities in the workplace? Question: Do veterans with disabilities have the knowledge, beliefs/willingness and practices in place to apply their rights as people with disabilities in the workplace?

23 Cant Barriers (Practices/Policies/Systems) We have needed knowledge We are committed But our practices/policies/ systems are in the way Wont Barriers (Attitudes/Beliefs/Expectations) We have good systems/practices/ policies We have needed knowledge But we are not willing & committed Dont Know Barriers (Knowledge/Information) We have good systems/practices/policies We are committed & willing But we lack knowledge An ecological framework: The DBTACNE Barrier Intervention Model ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

24 1. The Employer Study A surge of goodwill: Will it be enough? ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

25 1. The Employer Study In collaboration with: SHRM National ADA Network Northeast ADA Center (formerly DBTACNE) National Society of Human Resource Management SHRM ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

26 Methods Employer survey online only Took about min to complete 10,000 surveys distributed to members of SHRM 1,083 returned Mixed response scales Some response scales included a Not Sure option Respondent datafrom what type of org? etc? Survey based on DBTAC Barrier Intervention Model Study #1 Employer Study ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

27 Employer Study Findings: Employers knowledge, willingness & practices around employing veterans with disabilities ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

28 Overall: HR professionals are largely willing to hire veterans with disabilities and do see some benefits of having these veterans in their workforce Yet, they are struggling to turn this goodwill into solid HR practices to find, hire, and manage the talents of these veterans Expressed goodwill is not the same as prioritizing this issue! ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University Study #1 Employers

29 Do employers have the knowledge they need to be effective in employing veterans with disabilities? Recruiting. Most employers had not heard of resources related to finding and recruiting VWDs. –73% had not heard of the VetSuccess Program; –61% had not heard of the Wounded Warrior Program. –Varied by sectorgovt sector respondents more likely to know about recruiting resources Signature disabilities. Employers reported significant knowledge gaps regarding PTSD and TBI. –70% could not identify any possible accommodations needed by workers with TBI ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University Study #1 Employers

30 Do employers have the knowledge they need to be effective in employing veterans with disabilities? Accommodations. Employers largely did not know where to go to find accommodation resources for VWDs –41% did not know where to find resources to help them accommodate VWDs The Law. Employers were confused about disability disclosure and did not know which laws applied to VWDs 58% incorrectly believed applicants must disclose during the hiring process (a key finding given that, to a large degree, PTSD and TBI are often not obvious to others) 42% incorrectly believed that USERRA and not the ADA is the main law covering VWDs in the workplace 31% of respondents did not know which laws covered VWDs ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University Study #1 Employers

31 Do employers have the willingness/beliefs in place to employ VWDs? Overall perceived benefits. Generally, employers did believe in benefits of employing VWDs. –73% agreed or strongly agreed that hiring VWDs would benefit their business/organization –24% were unsure Job performance expectations. Employers generally believed VWDs could perform on the job. –72% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that VWDs perform as well as other employees –26% indicated they were not sure Customer relations. Employers generally believed hiring VWDs would be good for customers –71% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that hiring VWDs would improve their customer image; –24% were unsure Study #1 Employers

32 Do employers have the willingness/beliefs in place to employ VWDs? Yet… Perceived effort burden. Despite these positive beliefs, employers thought VWDs would require more effort. –61% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that accommodating workers with PTSD or TBI would require more effort on the part of the employer Manager time burden. Generally, employers believed VWDs would take more of a managers time. –61% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that accommodating VWDs would take more of a managers time –29% were unsure –10% believed accommodating VWDs would not take more of a managers time/effort Study #1 Employers

33 Do employers have the willingness/beliefs in place to employ VWDs? Cost burden. Generally, employers were unsure if accommodations would be costly. –35% of respondents disagreed or disagreed strongly that is costly to accommodate workers with PTSD or TBI. –52% of respondents were unsure whether accommodating workers with these disabilities would be costly Signature disabilities. Generally, employers were unsure if workers with the signature disabilities would be violent in the workplace. –39% of respondents disagreed or strongly disagreed that workers with PTSD were more likely than others to be violent in the workplace –53% did not know Study #1 Employers ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

34 Did employers have practices/processes in place to be effective in employing veterans with disabilities? General Recruiting Practices. Some employers use recruitment sources targeting veterans. –38% of respondents reported that their organization generally used recruitment sources targeting veterans –27% reported using recruitment sources that targeted people with disabilities VWD Recruiting Practices. Yet, surprisingly, these numbers drop precipitously when respondents were asked more specifically about using common recruiting sources targeting VWDs. –Only 2-3% of the employers surveyed reported using any of the specific resources among a list of possible sources for finding and recruiting VWDs –Varied by organization size: 25% of smaller organizations used recruitment sources targeting VWDs; 77% of larger organizations Study #1 Employers

35 Did employers have practices/processes in place to be effective in employing veterans with disabilities? The Diversity Plan. Generally, employers included disability and veterans in their diversity plans. –70% of respondents reported that they included disability in their diversity plans (Varied by organization size: 67% of smaller organizations and 93% of larger organizations included disability in diversity plan.) –67% included veterans (Varied by organization size: 59% of smaller organizations and 89% of larger organizations included veterans in their diversity plan.) Hiring. Generally, employers had not hired veterans with known disabilities. –17% had hired a veteran who had disclosed a disability either before or after time of hire –52% had not hired a veteran w ho had disclosed a disability –31% unsure Study #1 Employers

36 Did employers have practices/processes in place to be effective in employing veterans with disabilities? Accommodation Practices for PTSD. Employers had little experience accommodating workers with PTSD –Only 6% had accommodated a worker with PTSD in the last year –61% had not made any accommodations for PTSD –33% were unsure Accommodation Practices for TBI. Employers had little experience accommodating workers with TBI –Only 2% of respondents reported that their organization had accommodated a worker with TBI in the last 12 months –66% had not made accommodations for TBI –32% were unsure ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University Study #1 Employers

37 Did employers have practices/processes in place to be effective in employing veterans with disabilities? Centralized accommodation function. Some employers do not have a centralized accommodation office –40% of respondents indicated they had a centralized office to handle disability-related accommodation requests. Employee Assistance Program (EAP). Most employers do not have an EAP with expertise in VWDs –74% of respondents reported having an EAP –38% of respondents reported that their EAP had expertise in veterans issues Affinity/resource group. Most employers do not have an affinity group focusing on either disability or veterans issues. –9% of respondents indicated their organization had an affinity/resource group focused on disability –7% reported an affinity/resource group focused on veterans Study #1 Employers

38 Our findings… Limitations of our study: Not sure response category Surfaces knowledge needs, but masks socially undesirable responses? Sample that consisted solely of SHRM members Accessed a difficult-to-reach audience, but over-represented large, private sector organizations Could practices around diversity plans, EAP and Affinity groups be over-represented in our study? Study #1 Employers ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

39 Cant Barriers (Practices/Policies/Systems) What interventions will address these barriers? Wont Barriers (Attitudes/Beliefs/Expectations) What interventions will address these barriers? Dont Know Barriers (Knowledge/Information) What interventions will address these barriers? Using the ecological DBTAC – Northeast ADA Center Barrier Intervention Model to translate our findings

40 The Model highlights a misalignment of barriers and interventions Significant barriers to employing VWDs across all three areas posed by the model Yet, the bulk of prior interventions provided by the rehabilitation community have largely been directed toward knowledge barriers onlytoward disseminating more information Hence, our interventions have not been fully aligned with employer barriers

41 Three barriers posed by model do not exist in a vacuum, but are in a dynamic inter-relationship For example, our findings indicated that employers largely do no t have knowledge of resources for recruiting VWDs. Does this call for a proliferation of information resources around recruiting VWDs? Must ask: Why does this knowledge gap exist? It may be that employers have not prioritized this issue enough to seek out these resources or to devote the attention needed to wade through existing resources In other words, they may have this knowledge gap not because of a lack of resources, but because employers do not believe these resources will benefit them or can be integrated effectively into their current practicesbarriers in the Wont and Cant areas Hence, our efforts need to focus less on creating more information resources and more on understanding how employers make choices about seeking and using information related to VWDs in the workforce.

42 About willingness/belief barriers Practice Implications: Our findings show an inconsistent commitment to employing VWDs, particularly for signature disabilities Ultimately, employers resource-seeking, decisions and actions will be fueled by their calculations of the relative benefits and costs of employing VWDs Organizational change literature: The limitation of traditional training interventions in impacting these barriers Yet, this is likely to be the most frequently requested intervention by employers

43 About willingness/belief barriers So, whats to be done? Finding alternative interventions… Surfacing self awareness of unquestioned, automatic assumptions about VWDs, even when these are socially unacceptable Creating direct experiences with veterans with disabilities in the workplace, such as mentoring & internship Utilizing trusted, credible sources to engage in active myth- busting Move from traditional training to consulting

44 About willingness/belief barriers Further research: W. I. Thomas stated, What is believed to be true will be true in its effect. Use mixed methods to describe more deeply how employers beliefs about VWDs impact their choices and actions Open-ended, probing interviews to surface how decisions about VWDs in the workplace actually unfold Explore possible discrepancy between employers publicly held beliefs and their real on-the-ground decision-making Is there a tacit contradiction between public vs. private belief structures What might this tacit contradiction mean for future interventions?

45 About practice/policy barriers Several remaining questions about how employers are actually using practices such as diversity plans, EAP and Affinity groups Clearly, employers lack prior experience with VWDs, particularly those with signature disabilities Further research: Explore impact of organizational size and type (public/private) Mixed methodsopen the black box of real-life in the workplace; surveys alone render invisible the tacit features of how practices/policies are actually formed A deeper view is especially needed given the nature of the signature disabilities of PTSD and TBI--In addition to being mysterious to many employers, these disabilities are highly stigmatized and are likely to be unfolding after the veteran has returned to civilian work life

46 Conclusions of employers study… What was surprising? They do have good will in this area and believe overall hiring VWDs would benefit their business, but this belief is not strong enough to prioritize this issue when it competes with other demands Disconnect between what they aspire to and what they actually do Largely dont use recruitment resources Did have some key knowledge gapsdisclosure and accommodation The extent to which signature disabilities were mysterious didnt have any experience and were really struggling with accommodating Effect of organizational sector (public/private) was clear, but needs more elaboration Study #1 Employers

47 Study #2. Veteran Study In collaboration with: Kessler Foundation Tip of the Arrow Foundation SM Clark, U.S. Army Northeast ADA Center ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

48 The purpose of this project was to describe the readiness of veterans with disabilities to enter/re- enter the workforce as a person with a disability. A gap--Veterans were being prepared for work life in the areas of medical rehabilitation, vocational training, skills acquisition, resume preparation and interview practice But are they prepared to work the ADA?To deal with legal, practical and human issues around working with a disability? Study #2 Veterans with disabilities ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

49 Methods Veterans survey pencil & paper only Data collected June – Nov 2010 Incentivized self-selected volunteers completed survey Surveys distributed at veteran job fairs and Wounded Warrior Units in several locations Survey took about 20 minutes to complete 421 surveys completed Survey based on DBTAC Barrier Intervention Model Study #2 Veterans with disabilities ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

50 Sample was somewhat representative of veterans in general: Army (57%), male (83%), and white (53%) 69% served in OIF and/or OEF 86% self-identified as having a disability 57% mental condition (e.g. depression and/or PTSD) 60% physical disability 30% sensory disability Our sample was somewhat older and have more education than veterans in general: 67% were at least 40 years old Had higher level of education Study #2 Veterans with disabilities ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

51 What do veterans know? Overall, scored higher on a True/false test about ADA than what we thought. But, nearly half believed these three statements were true: A veteran with a disability must tell an employer about a disability when they apply for a job. A worker who did not tell their employer about a disability when they were hired can be fired when the employer finds out. The employer does not have to change anything about how a job is done to accommodate a worker with a disability. 44% strongly agreed or agreed that they have a good understanding of what types of accommodations they will need on the job. 36% report they know where to get information about employment issues Fewer, only 29% have thought through how they will discuss an accommodation need with an employer. Study #2 Veterans with disabilities

52 Study #2 Veteran Study

53 What do veterans believe/expect about their worklives as people with disabilities? Almost 60% of respondents feared disability discrimination in hiring 29% believed they were ready to advocate for themselves as a person with a disability in the workplace Almost half (46%) agreed/strongly agreed that their disability would prevent them from obtaining many jobs Substantially fewer (35%) agreed/strongly agreed that their disability will prevent them from performing jobs Less than half (44%) were comfortable communicating their accommodation needs with an employer Those with the signature disabilities fear disability discrimination more Study #2 Veterans with disabilities ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

54 Study #2 Veteran Study

55 What are veterans doing/intending? About 2/3 are unlikely or somewhat unlikely to disclose either during hiring or employment Veterans with disabilities intend to disclose their disability during the hiring-process at a higher rate than after they are employed (This finding must be viewed in light of the fact that many veterans believe they must disclose a disability at time of hire) The decision to disclose depends on the type of disability. o Veterans with the signature disabilities of PTSD and TBI intend to disclose at a somewhat lower rate than those with physical disabilities Study #2 Veterans with disabilities ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

56 What are veterans doing/intending? Most veterans do not intend to request an accommodation either during hiring or employment Veterans with physical disabilities were somewhat more likely to ask for an accommodation Study #2 Veterans with disabilities ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

57 Study #2 Veteran Study

58

59

60 Limitations of veterans study… Our sample was somewhat older and better educated than the vet population as a whole (though veterans on the whole are now being called from older populations than prior engagements) What definition of disability? Veterans can get confused by military benefits definition of disability and the ADA definition Response categoriesUsing True/False (Though large sample size should correct for guessing) Study #2 Veterans with disabilities ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

61 Conclusions –What was surprising in our data? Higher than expected scores on True/False quiz (but our sample was better educated than representative of vets) Yet, True/False test showed they struggle with key rights: disclosure and accommodation The extent to which they feared discrimination How little they had thought through disclosure decisions and accommodation process (need and request) How little they use recruitment and other resources, even though they are aware of them Study #2 Veterans with disabilities ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

62 In a nutshell, our conclusions… Remember the three veterans with disabilities? Goodwill & yellow ribbons are not enoughdisability inclusive workplace issues are largely veterans issues Veterans do fear disability discrimination and this fear is somewhat justified Contradictions to yellow ribbon spirit are largely tacit Overall, neither employers nor veterans with disabilities are fully prepared to work the ADA to ensure a disability inclusive workplace ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

63 In a nutshell, whats to be done? Veterans and employers do have some knowledge needs, specifically disclosure and accommodation request rights Knowledge of ADA, disclosure decisions and accommodation practices need to be part of VR process for vets BUT--Few vets intend to disclose their disability and request an accommodation; simply knowing their rights might not change these decisions We need to get beyond Spray & PrayDisseminating knowledge wont be enough A myriad confusing array of resources/efforts/information already exist, but stakeholders are largely NOT using the resources we already have even when they are aware of these resources! ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

64 In a nutshell, 10 points for employers… 1. Do you understand the special workplace dynamic of the veterans signature disabilities of PTSD and TBI? The unfolding nature of these disabilities The changing nature of these disabilities Diagnosis alone will not be enough The highly-stigmatized nature of these disabilities ; unfounded, automatic assumptions Will people with these disabilities trust to come forward? 2.Have a look at your diversity plan; does it include disability? Veterans with disabilities will need more than a diversity plan ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

65 In a nutshell, 10 points for employers… 3.Are you familiar with the resources? A broad array of resources are available for employers on recruiting, hiring and accommodating veterans with disabilities 4.Are you trying to go it alone? Many opportunities for employers to build partnerships, both in local communities as well as nationally ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

66 In a nutshell, 10 points for employers… 5. Can you separate fact from fiction? Our survey suggests that the signature disabilities of PTSD and TBI are mysterious to many HR professionals, both in terms of their workplace implications as well as fears of possible threats. What assumptions could be tacitly driving your hiring decisions?. 6. Are face-to-face leaders on board? In many organizations, it is mid-level managers who are the real gatekeepers of disability inclusive workplace practices and cultures. 7.Can you accommodate BOTH obvious and non-obvious disabilities? Most employers get it when it comes to accommodating employees with obvious disabilities, such as those who use wheelchairs. But they struggle with accommodating employees with non-obvious disabilities.

67 In a nutshell, 10 points for employers… 8. Are people with disabilities and veterans included in your talent acquisition practices? Our survey showed that many HR professionals are not aware of and do not use recruitment resources that would reach veterans with disabilities. 9.Do you understand which laws apply? Some employers responding to our survey were confused about the laws applying to veterans with disabilities in the workforce. ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

68 In a nutshell, 10 points for employers… 10. What actually happens to people with disabilities in your workforce? Disability issues are veterans issues! When workers come forward with a disability and accommodation need, what actually happens to them in your workplace? Ultimately, what happens to employees with disabilities in your organization will happen to veterans with disabilities. And this will be the true test of your goodwill.

69 In a nutshell: Why is this important? To veterans themselves: Work is part of the healing process To businesses: Accessing a talented workforce To the rest of us: Not repeating the mistakes of the Vietnam era ©2011 Northeast ADA Center, Cornell University

70 Disability and Business Technical Assistance Center – Northeast ADA Center ILR - Employment and Disability Institute Cornell University 201L Dolgen Hall Ithaca, NY in NY, NJ, PR, VI


Download ppt "Beyond Yellow Ribbons: How Prepared are Veterans with Disabilities and Employers to Participate in a Disability Inclusive Workforce? Hannah Rudstam, Ph.D."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google