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1 INCOSE2001 MELBOURNE AUSTRALIA 1 - 5 JULY July 2, 2001 ACADEMIC FORUM ACADEMIC CONTRIBUTIONS TO SUPPORT SYSTEMS ENGINEERING Philip MPherson Systems &

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Presentation on theme: "1 INCOSE2001 MELBOURNE AUSTRALIA 1 - 5 JULY July 2, 2001 ACADEMIC FORUM ACADEMIC CONTRIBUTIONS TO SUPPORT SYSTEMS ENGINEERING Philip MPherson Systems &"— Presentation transcript:

1 1 INCOSE2001 MELBOURNE AUSTRALIA JULY July 2, 2001 ACADEMIC FORUM ACADEMIC CONTRIBUTIONS TO SUPPORT SYSTEMS ENGINEERING Philip MPherson Systems & Value Ltd Emeritus Professor of Systems Engineering and Management

2 2 INCOSE2001 MELBOURNE AUSTRALIA JULY July 2, 2001 C) 2001 Systems & Value Ltd SE COMPETENCE: WHATS THE PROBLEM? 1 Shortage of Competent PSEs 2 SE Knowledge Requirement 3 Silo Mentality 4 Legacy 5 Blindness to value of SE 6 Lack of SE Leadership In-house Devt Coverage Turf Wars Turf Wars Turnover Continuity Tunnel Vision Anti-disciplinary Low Status Incompatibility Demand Supply Industry Universities

3 3 INCOSE2001 MELBOURNE AUSTRALIA JULY July 2, 2001 C) 2001 Systems & Value Ltd SE PROCESS Upgrades System Creation System Delivery LCCLCE LCVFM The Right System to Build Projected LCVFM MYTH MODEL DesignConceptBuildOperations Emergent LCVFM (Actual) Operations Mgt Reliability Mgt Capability Mgt HR Mgt What you get Operational VFM UR SR AR V&V V&V Build

4 4 INCOSE2001 MELBOURNE AUSTRALIA JULY July 2, 2001 C) 2001 Systems & Value Ltd SE KNOWLEDGE REQUIREMENT Design Concept Build Operations System Creation System Delivery Engineering Systems Maths SW Eng Mangt Eng HRM Measurement Value Fundamentals, Electrical, Mechanical, Fluids, Aero, Nav Arch, Eng Design Concepts, Control Eng, HST, Complexity, Creativity Fundamentals, Modelling, Simulation, Sys Dynamics, ISM, Prob & Stats, Solution methods Numerical science, Programming, HCI, SW Metrics, SW reliability Reliability Eng, Logistics Eng, Project Mgt Org behaviour, Group dynamics, Leadership Fundamentals, System metrics, MOE, Value Theory, Accounting, ABC, Financial anal, CEA And thats why SE is so difficult for discipline- oriented academics to cope with

5 5 MV($) E(1) E(2) E(N) E(S)IC(S) HC SC RC July 2, 2001 (C) 2001 Systems & Value Ltd INCOSE2001 MELBOURNE AUSTRALIA JULY THE VALUE OF SE Stakeholders Sponsor (1) Contractors PSEs Sponsor (1) Sponsor (2) Contractors PSEs Users Public CREATION DELIVERY V(CE) E(S) V(ME)IV Inclusive Value

6 6 System Creation System Delivery INCOSE2001 MELBOURNE AUSTRALIA JULY July 2, 2001 C) 2001 Systems & Value Ltd THE VALUE OF PSEs SYSTEMS ENGINEERS Create the POTENTIAL VALUE of the future system Assure the INTRINSIC VALUE of the system Cause the INSTRUMENTAL VALUE of the system DesignConceptBuildOperations UR SR AR V&V V&V

7 7 INCOSE2001 MELBOURNE AUSTRALIA JULY July 2, 2001 C) 2001 Systems & Value Ltd PSE: OPERATIONAL SPACE System Manufacturers: Prime Contractors Sub-Contractors Large System Operators: Military (Land, Sea, Space) Transport (Land,Sea, Air) Government systems Telecoms & Broadcasting Infrastructure & Construction Extraction (Water, Oil, Mining) Civil (Health, Police, Financial) Chemical & Pharmaceuticals Manufacturing Industry Business (Info, Logistics, Financial) System Houses: Software Integrators Consultancies R&D Houses: In-House Contract Universities PSE Development: Universities & Colleges In-house OJT Commercial Trainers Professional Institutions

8 8 INCOSE2001 MELBOURNE AUSTRALIA JULY July 2, 2001 C) 2001 Systems & Value Ltd THE SE NETWORK System Manufacturers Large System Operators System Houses R&D Houses Universities PSE Development: Universities & Colleges Commercial Trainers Professional Institutions In-house OJT

9 9 INCOSE2001 MELBOURNE AUSTRALIA JULY July 2, 2001 C) 2001 Systems & Value Ltd UNIVERSITY ANSWERS 1 Accept that SE is not accessible until the young engineer is already formed (1st degree years) 4 Develop teaching partnerships with industry 2 Accept that small isolated groups are not effective 3 Construct continuing development programme with Industry and Prof. Orgs (POs) 5 Research need, supply & demand of SEs in each sector 1 Shortage of Competent PSEs

10 10 INCOSE2001 MELBOURNE AUSTRALIA JULY July 2, 2001 C) 2001 Systems & Value Ltd UNIVERSITY ANSWERS 1 Accept that formal courses without work experience do not produce PSEs 5 Set up national fora to establish network and organise formal development programme within national structures 2 Ensure that sponsors/employers provide their share of development & OJT 3 Research the SEKR as knowledge (epistemology, ontology) and as praxis (disciplines, applications) 2 SE Knowledge Requirement (SEKR) 4 Codify SEKR and research new teaching methods

11 11 INCOSE2001 MELBOURNE AUSTRALIA JULY July 2, 2001 C) 2001 Systems & Value Ltd UNIVERSITY ANSWERS 1 Recruit the University President and Academic Dean onto your side and way of thinking 4 Offer systems thinking programmes for senior managers and executives in industry 2 Start inter-faculty seminars to present SE and SEKR, and show that teaching a formal subject in discipline X is not the same as teaching the same subject in an interdisciplinary course. 3 Silo mentality 3 Send missionaries to other departments to teach relevant aspects of SE 5 Research the human tendency to silos and means to undermine

12 12 INCOSE2001 MELBOURNE AUSTRALIA JULY July 2, 2001 C) 2001 Systems & Value Ltd UNIVERSITY ANSWERS 5 Establish cross- or joint appointments with industry for faculty and company staff 2 Publish review papers to relate present problems to their antecedents 4 Legacy 4 Attend to the continuity problem, to ensure that a good SE department does not collapse on the departure of a strong champion 1 Compile an institutional memory for best ideas, papers and practice of the past and feed them into the present 3 Incorporate historical perspectives in teaching and company programmes

13 13 INCOSE2001 MELBOURNE AUSTRALIA JULY July 2, 2001 C) 2001 Systems & Value Ltd UNIVERSITY ANSWERS 1 Research value of SE to (a) businesses, and (b) to cognitive development 2 Research case studies to establish ROI in SE to business 5 Blindness to value of SE 3 Research measurement techniques for intangible and IC value of SE 4 Ensure that university authorities understand potential of SE to industry and its support

14 14 INCOSE2001 MELBOURNE AUSTRALIA JULY July 2, 2001 C) 2001 Systems & Value Ltd UNIVERSITY ANSWERS 1 Accept that small SE departments are not viable, unless strongly supported with budget by university authorities 2 Heads of SE Departments should be champions and drivers as well as academically acceptable 5 Lack of SE Leadership 3 Ensure that all SE staff have useful experience in industry 4 Even a strong academic leader will need top backing to prevent turf war from other departments

15 15 INCOSE2001 MELBOURNE AUSTRALIA JULY July 2, 2001 C) 2001 Systems & Value Ltd UNIVERSITY CONTRIBUTION Universities have four vital inputs: 1 They provide the intellectual foundation for SEs most important asset: the Intellectual Capital embodied in PSEs 4 They are key elements, with the POs, in establishing and operating the global SE network 3 They provide the continuity of knowledge in SEs evolution 2 They are the prime resource for Reflective SE: examining and developing thought modes and methodology

16 16 INCOSE2001 MELBOURNE AUSTRALIA JULY July 2, 2001 C) 2001 Systems & Value Ltd THE ROLE OF THE UNIVERSITIES REFLECTION CONTINUITY INTELLECTUAL CAPITAL of SE NETWORK If that structure is absent, SE stagnates


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