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Chapter 7 Administration of the Fire Department. Introduction The fire chief must balance the needs of the community and the department with the resources.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 7 Administration of the Fire Department. Introduction The fire chief must balance the needs of the community and the department with the resources."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 7 Administration of the Fire Department

2 Introduction The fire chief must balance the needs of the community and the department with the resources available Personnel must be properly led and supported in performing their functions Administrative staff perform their duties to ensure that the personnel of the department are trained, equipped, and supplied with the necessary support services

3 PRINCIPLES OF COMMAND Are general guidelines Department should serve the needs of its jurisdiction Used in both emergency and non-emergency organizations Divided into six areas Learning Objectives 1, 4, and 5 Six Principles and Chain of Command Fire Department Organizational Chart

4 UNITY OF COMMAND Each person has one boss Everyone has a clear understanding of who is the supervisor NIMS is based on unity of command structure Violation of unity of command leads to confusion Learning Objectives 1, 4, and 5 Six Principles and Chain of Command Fire Department Organizational Chart

5 CHAIN OF COMMAND Formal path of communication though the organization Communication flows from top up and bottom down Cannot be violated unless extreme circumstances Learning Objectives 1, 4, and 5 Six Principles and Chain of Command Fire Department Organizational Chart

6 SPAN OF CONTROL Can effectively only supervise a certain number of personnel Effective span is considered three to seven Decisions dispersed through chain of command Prevents information overload Learning Objectives 1, 4, and 5 Six Principles and Chain of Command Fire Department Organizational Chart

7 DIVISION OF LABOR Work divided into specific areas Apply most appropriate resources Determine responsibility for completion Base on area, skill, and complexity Avoids duplication of effort Learning Objectives 1, 4, and 5 Six Principles and Chain of Command Fire Department Organizational Chart

8 DELEGATION OF AUTHORITY Manager must delegate authority to subordinates Supervisor must ensure proper training received Responsibility is still manager’s Person assuming responsibility must ensure the function is going to be performed Learning Objectives 1, 4, and 5 Six Principles and Chain of Command Fire Department Organizational Chart

9 EXCEPTION PRINCIPLE Person delegating authority wants to be informed of situations of major importance Certain situations arise that the supervisor needs to know about Personnel matters, major incidents, or incidents involving major expense to the department Learning Objectives 1, 4, and 5 Six Principles and Chain of Command Fire Department Organizational Chart

10 MANAGEMENT CYCLE Problem-solving process to accomplish goals and objectives Objectives must be specific, measurable, attainable, Realistic, and timely Learning Objective 2 Six Components of the Management Cycle

11 PLANNING Determining objectives and how to achieve them Requires the use of policies  Course or method of action Procedures  Particular way of accomplishing something Learning Objective 2 Six Components of the Management Cycle

12 ORGANIZING Done after planning Managers bring together essential resources Framework is chain of command and table of organization Manager determines if positions can be filled Learning Objective 2 Six Components of the Management Cycle

13 STAFFING The assignment of resources to the needs Determine adequate staffing Large departments may have rapid intervention teams Effective fire prevention requires enough personnel assigned to that function Learning Objective 2 Six Components of the Management Cycle

14 DIRECTING Guiding and supervising efforts Accomplished through:  Rules  Standard operating procedures  Job descriptions  Assigned duties Learning Objective 2 Six Components of the Management Cycle

15 CONTROLLING Determining if organization is working toward goals Discrepancies require corrective actions Largest control is the annual budget Financial officer will keep fire chief up to date on yearly budget Learning Objective 2 Six Components of the Management Cycle

16 EVALUATING Determining whether goals and objectives are being met Must be measurable and attainable Evaluation is both internal and external Must be carried out objectively Is an ongoing process Learning Objective 2 Six Components of the Management Cycle

17 FOUR BASIC METHODS Face to face  Most likely to be understood Radio/telephone Written Electronic Learning Objective 3 Four Methods of Communication

18 FIRE DEPARTMENT TYPES Type depends on needs and resources Vary in size Increase in size, and increase in complexity More than 30,000 fire departments across the United States involving 1.2 million firefighters Learning Objective 6 Identify Different Fire Department Types

19 VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENTS First departments in the U.S. Preliminary first step in fire service Common paid position in a volunteer department is a driver Not predetermined how many personnel will arrive at the scene Learning Objective 6 Identify Different Fire Department Types

20 COMBINATION FIRE DEPARTMENT Large part of staff is paid Volunteers cover station when crew is on assignment Concept provides a force of reserves Reserves gain training Department gains personnel Learning Objective 6 Identify Different Fire Department Types

21 PUBLIC SAFETY DEPARTMENT Police and fire departments are under same department head Personnel are cross trained Increased productivity Learning Objective 6 Identify Different Fire Department Types

22 CAREER FIRE DEPARTMENTS All personnel are paid a salary Too large to be performed by volunteers Jurisdiction has control over personnel Requires expert management  Policies and goals Learning Objective 6 Identify Different Fire Department Types

23 INDUSTRIAL FIRE BRIGADES Manufacturing, refinery, or other location Personnel hired by the company CONTRACT FIRE PROTECTION SERVICE Private-sector companies Service by contract or subscription Learning Objective 6 Identify Different Fire Department Types

24 LAYERS OF MANAGEMENT Deputy chief Battalion or district chief Company officer Learning Objective 7 Ranks and Their General Responsibilities

25 FIRE CHIEF ATTRIBUTES Educated in public or fire administration  Advanced education, master’s degree preferred Ability to communicate Needs to be a diplomat  Interpret wishes of governing body Learning Objective 8 Customer Service, One Department Concept, Team Building, and Incident Effectiveness

26 CUSTOMER SERVICE Public is the customer  Customer’s needs must be met ONE DEPARTMENT CONCEPT Standardization  Same procedures throughout the jurisdiction Learning Objective 8 Customer Service, One Department Concept, Team Building, and Incident Effectiveness

27 TEAM BUILDING Willing to work together  Each shift able to support the other INCIDENT EFFECTIVENESS Ability to function quickly and efficiently Learning Objective 8 Customer Service, One Department Concept, Team Building, and Incident Effectiveness

28 Summary We have looked at the importance of administration at all levels in accomplishing the mission of the fire department Administration is made up of people performing according to widely accepted concepts and standards Depending on the size of the department and its needs, the organization of the administration can vary widely The most important point is that without the support of administrative staff, the line would not function


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