Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Considerations when Adapting Books Shelly Voelker, M.Ed., Ed.S. Florida Outreach Project

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Considerations when Adapting Books Shelly Voelker, M.Ed., Ed.S. Florida Outreach Project"— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Considerations when Adapting Books Shelly Voelker, M.Ed., Ed.S. Florida Outreach Project

3 Go to: IndexGo to: Index How will the book be held and/or positioned?

4 Go to: IndexGo to: Index How will pages be turned?

5 Go to: IndexGo to: Index What style and size font are needed? 18 font Times New Roman? 20 font ABCPrint? BOLD or NOT BOLD? 24 font Century Gothic? 28 font Arial Rounded MT Bold? Download Braille + ASL fonts

6 Go to: Index Go to: Index What colors and contrast are needed?

7 Go to: Index Go to: Index Should photos or pictures accompany the text? This is a cow. cow

8 This is a cow. cow Go to: Index Go to: Index Should photos or pictures accompany the text?

9 The cow jumped over the moon. Go to: Index Go to: Index Should words and pictures appear on the same page?

10 The cow jumped over the moon. Go to: Index Go to: Index Should words and pictures appear on the same page?

11 Go to: Index Go to: Index What readability level (sentence length, word length) is appropriate? Click the Microsoft Office Button, and then click Word Options. Click Proofing. Make sure Check grammar with spelling is selected. Under When correcting grammar in Word, select the Show readability statistics check box. How much vocabulary is involved?

12 Go to: Index Go to: Index Could tactile features enhance the text?

13 Prize-winning tactile book

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23 Perkins Webcast: Adapting BooksAdapting Books Modifications to the TEXT Modifications to the PICTURES Modifications to the BOOK

24 In order to foster literacy learning for students who are blind or who are deaf-blind, they need to have access to a changing assortment of accessible books. The books described below have been brailled and adapted with tactuals and are currently being used by students with deaf-blindness in North Carolina model classrooms. All directions contain a materials shopping list and page-by-page directions that includes photographs. The books themselves need to be purchased separately. The below books are appropriate for all students, but have been specifically adapted for students with the most significant disabilities, including deaf-blindness. We have been making the Start-to-Finish Literacy Series (Don Johnston, Inc.) paperback books accessible to the students with signficant visual impairments in the deafblind model demonstration project by adding tactual features. Below are directions on how to tactualize the books for your own use. Plants-Science & Surroundings Kit Recycling-Cash in the Trash Kit Let's Do Plants Snowballs in the Desert A Person or a Plant? Down in the Dumps Shop Til You Drop Can It! Life Cycles-Birth & Beyond Kit The Life Cycle of a Butterfly I Made a Frog

25 Making Story Bags or Story Boxes Story bags or story boxes are a collection of materials that are used to demonstrate the story when reading a particular book, whether it is a print picture book or one with braille added to the pages. When collecting materials to put in the story bag or box, look for things that your child will enjoy touching. You don't have to have every object named in the book, but focus on a collection of objects that are important in acting out the story. You might have a book about a boy who lives on a farm and enjoys playing in the mud in the barnyard, feeding hay to the horses, collecting eggs from the chickens, and eating tomatoes from the garden. It won't be possible to get the animals in the story for your story box of course. But you might get some hay, a hard-boiled egg, and a tomato. As you and your child read the book together, you can have her pull each object out of the box as you read about it. She can act out the story using the objects. When acting out a story, avoid using plastic objects such as pretend fruit or miniature animals. For a child who is blind, there is little or no resemblance between a miniature plastic horse and the large, warm, breathing creature covered with hair that is the real animal. Not only that, but feeling the difference between a plastic tomato and a plastic apple may be difficult for many children. It is best to use real objects whenever possible. If you need to use something that is not real—such as a stuffed mouse rather than a real one—talk with your child about the difference between "pretend" and "real." Reading and Making Tactile Books with Your Child D=3875

26 Could tactile features enhance the text? experience-books-for-young-children-with-visual-impairments experience-books-for-young-children-with-visual-impairments By Sandra Lewis, Associate Professor and Coordinator, Program in Visual Impairment, College of Education, Florida State University, and Joan Tolla, Orientation and Mobility Specialist, Tift and Irwin County Schools, Georgia. Reprinted from Teaching Exceptional Children, vol. 35, No. 3, pp "My Garden Walk" by Mary Title cover: "My Garden Walk" by Mary: Glued to the center of the cover page were several pebbles from the path on which Mary had walked. Page 1: Brailled sentence at the bottom of the page read. "I went for a walk in the school garden. I found 1 piece of tree bark." Glued to the center of the page was a large piece of tree bark. Page 2: Brailled sentence "On the ground were 3 stones. Count them with me." 3 stones, one small, medium, and large, were glued onto this page. Page 3: Braille sentence, "I have 4 limbs from a tree." Arranged in increasing size were 4 limbs from various trees. Page 4: Brailled sentence, "I picked 3 leaves, one large, one medium, and one small." In descending size, three different leaves were glued onto the center of the page. Page 5: Brailled sentence, "I petted one bunny rabbit." In a plastic Zip-lock bag glued to the center of the page was bunny fur found on the ground near the bunny's cage. Page 6: Brailled sentence, "I picked a flower." One flower from a bush was attached to the center of the page. Page 7: Brailled sentence, "I had fun walking with Ms. Joan." Stapled to this page was the elastic from the handle of a discarded cane like the one used by Mary.

27 “Things for My Hair” Title Cover: "Things for My Hair" A hairbrush was attached to cover with Velcro. Page 1: "Shampoo to clean my hair. Conditioner to make it soft." Small travel-size containers filled with a little shampoo/conditioner attached at the center of the page with Velcro. Page 2: "A brush and combs for my hair." Two combs and one small brush were attached to the page with Velcro. A large brush was attached to a string and hung outside of the book. Page 3: "Hair rollers to help curl my hair." Various sizes and makes of rollers were placed into a small plastic bag. The bag was fastened at the top of the page with Velcro. Page 4: "Large and small barrettes hold my hair in place." Various sizes and types of barrettes were placed in a bag, and the bag was fastened at the top of the page with Velcro. Page 5: "Bobby pins hold my hair in place." Large, small, and medium-size bobby pins were placed in a bag that was attached to the page. Page 6: "Ponytail holders keep my hair in a ponytail." Same as pages 4 and 5. Page 7: "Clincher combs keep my hair back." Same as pages 4 and 5. Page 8: "Headbands keep my hair out of my face." Same as pages 4 and 5. Could tactile features enhance the text? experience-books-for-young-children-with-visual-impairments experience-books-for-young-children-with-visual-impairments

28 Tactile Experience Books Shelly Voelker, M.Ed., Ed.S. Florida Outreach Project

29 A child’s trip to an amusement park is recreated tactilely using items from the trip (e.g., part of the popcorn box, the wristband to get him on rides, a straw for the drink that was purchased, a small souvenir). The child’s grandparent discusses the event while encouraging the child to manipulate each object in the "story or memory" box. Each item is labeled in braille and print.

30 What is an "experience book?“ Experience books are similar to traditional books in that they: tell a story; are tied to specific language/communication; allow a child to share, re-create, and review the same story over and over again with many different people, whether at home or at school; and are the basis for conversation. Experience books differ from traditional books in that: Experience books are created with a specific reader in mind. The story is based on an experience or interest of the target reader. The objects included in the experience book are particular to the experience or interest of the student for whom the book is made. The words written (and, when appropriate, brailled) on the pages are chosen for a particular student.

31 Go to: IndexGo to: Index No Tech: Make Your Own Board Books Make a Custom Lift-the-Flap Book for a Toddler How to Make Baby Board Book in Microsoft Word | eHow.com Make a Board Book From Christmas Cards: Recycle Holiday Greetings... How to Make a Chunky Board Book: Create a Book to Embellish Later How to Make a Board Book Album | eHow.com Book Projects - Books to Make Cover and Read

32 Go to: IndexGo to: Index Florida Instructional Materials Center Instructional Materials Center Resources

33 Matthieu’s Music Book Created as part of a workshop on Early Literacy Experiences, these books provide ideas for other teachers using PowerPoint to create books for their own students. If you would like to share your creations, please send them to

34 I like music. These books provide ideas for other teachers using PowerPoint to create books for their own students. If you would like to share your creations, please send them to

35 Hear the drums. These books provide ideas for other teachers using PowerPoint to create books for their own students. If you would like to share your creations, please send them to

36 I like music. These books provide ideas for other teachers using PowerPoint to create books for their own students. If you would like to share your creations, please send them to

37 Hear the piano. These books provide ideas for other teachers using PowerPoint to create books for their own students. If you would like to share your creations, please send them to

38 I like music. These books provide ideas for other teachers using PowerPoint to create books for their own students. If you would like to share your creations, please send them to

39 Hear the guitar. These books provide ideas for other teachers using PowerPoint to create books for their own students. If you would like to share your creations, please send them to

40 I like music These books provide ideas for other teachers using PowerPoint to create books for their own students. If you would like to share your creations, please send them to

41 Hear the band. These books provide ideas for other teachers using PowerPoint to create books for their own students. If you would like to share your creations, please send them to

42 THE END These books provide ideas for other teachers using PowerPoint to create books for their own students. If you would like to share your creations, please send them to

43 Go to: Index Go to: Index Creating PowerPoint Books Power Point Book Template This PowerPoint presentation introduces teachers of the visually impaired and blind to the software and hardware used to enhance the student’s educational experience. An extra section has been added to introduce the Federal Regulations related to Assistive Technology. A Step-By-Step Method to Create PowerPoint Books Step-by-step directions for creating PowerPoint books. Includes instructions for inserting pictures, sounds, music, and reading text.

44 Go to: IndexGo to: Index Universal Design for Learning Design for Learning

45 Go to: IndexGo to: Index High Tech:

46 Go to: IndexGo to: Index High Tech:

47 Go to: Index Go to: Index Low tech: Talking Picture BookLow tech: Talking Picture Book

48 There’s an App for That!

49 There’s an App for That! Book Creator

50 /www.microsoft.com/en-us/office365/free-office365- trial.aspx?WT.srch=1&WT.mc_id=PS_google_Office+365_Introduce_microsoft%20office%20applications_Text#fbid=1bVd bbUeCCK Kids%20With%20Special%20Needshttp://savvyauntie.com/ExpertiseDetails.aspx?GroupId=84&Id=2147&Name=The%20Best%20iPad%20Apps%20for% 20Kids%20With%20Special%20Needs There’s an App for That!

51 autism/?scp=1&sq=apps+autism&st=cse books 20&index=aps&hvadid= &ref=pd_sl_3a0awspy3f_b

52 Read2Go is simple, fast, easy… access all of your favorite Bookshare books and more on the iPad, iPhone and iPod touch!

53 Janice Light & David McNaughton, Pennsylvania State University

54 Resources: Tactile Graphics American Printing House for the Blind (APH) Tactile Graphic Image Library APH Guidelines for the Design of Tactile GraphicsBasics APH Tips & Techniques for Creating Quality Tactile GraphicsWebcast Guide to Designing Tactile Illustrations for Children's Books APH Early Tactile Skills & ConceptsAPH Early Tactile Skills & Concepts Tactile Understanding ManualsTactile UnderstandingManuals Workshop: Making Test Items Accessible for Students Who Are Blind... Texas School for the Blind & Visually Impaired: Tactile Graphics Resources TSBVI: Math Graphics Lucia Hasty’s Tactile Graphics Website Tactile Graphics: Overview & Resource Guide Royal National Institute for the Blind (RNIB): Tactile Graphics RNIB National Centre for Tactile Diagrams Sensible Graphics: Adapted Graphics Available Online Tactile Colour CommunicationReturn to Page 1

55 Other Resources Adapt-A-Book Ideas from the Bridge School Baltimore City Public Schools - Assistive Technology GCA/RWMS Adapted Books Unity Adapted Books Adapted Book Products and Information - Special Education ServiceAdapted Book Products and Information - Special Education Service Alaska One Place for Special Needs NYC Adapted Books Catalog Adapted Book – 5 Pumpkins Library of Congress Children’s Literature Digitized A-Z of Adapting Books.doc Assistive Technology symbols, overlays, & resources Adapting Story-time to Engage the Child with Special Needs Literacy Resources for Special NeedsFree Printables


Download ppt "Considerations when Adapting Books Shelly Voelker, M.Ed., Ed.S. Florida Outreach Project"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google