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 OSHA web site: www.osha.govwww.osha.gov › eTools  Idaho S&H Consultation: (208) 426-3283 › www2.boisestate.edu/oshconsult www2.boisestate.edu/oshconsult.

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Presentation on theme: " OSHA web site: www.osha.govwww.osha.gov › eTools  Idaho S&H Consultation: (208) 426-3283 › www2.boisestate.edu/oshconsult www2.boisestate.edu/oshconsult."— Presentation transcript:

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2  OSHA web site: › eTools  Idaho S&H Consultation: (208) › www2.boisestate.edu/oshconsult www2.boisestate.edu/oshconsult  Boise Area OSHA Office: (208) › Duty Officers › Compliance Assistance Specialist

3  ^URS  143  AAK  BCNU  CYM  DAMHIKT  GAL  N-A-Y-L  P2C2E  TCOY Up Yours I Love You Asleep At Keyboard Be Seeing You Check Your Mail Don’t Ask Me How I Know That Get A Life In A While Process Too Complicated to Explain Take Care of Yourself

4  Is the same as lack of communication  Is the root cause of the majority of problems in the workplace  Fog of Communication - in transmission and reception: › › Tweeter › Texting › Industry jargon › Preconceived thoughts and assumptions › Unclear thoughts › Lack of knowledge of policies and processes › Dialects › English as a second language

5  State your request/objective/case clearly  Assume nothing  Use concise phrases  Actively listen to response  Ask questions  Restate the situation  Agree on the action

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8  Essential character  An inherent or distinguishing attribute  A character trait  Superiority of kind  Degree or grade of excellence

9  Able to meet the customers needs and his business objectives  Vehicle for success and repeat business  Adds value  Project execution

10  Meet the customer’s needs: › Customer satisfaction  Employee involvement: › Seek employee input on the best way to do the job › Develops an employee’s sense of worth and value to the company  Teamwork: › Can produce better results  Continuous Process Improvement: › Become as efficient as possible › “If it’s not broke, let’s improve it.”

11  Being forthright with customers, employees, and the community  Developing values, rules, and policies that are the cornerstone of the company – not options in decision making  Decency when dealing with others  Doing what is right when it is easier, quicker, and cost less not to

12 FAIRNESS HONESTY INTEGRITY Our Customers Our People The Environment Our Shareholders The quality policy begins with focused attention on the four areas most crucial to our continued growth and prosperity: Our Customers, Our People, The Environment and Our Shareholders! TRUST These building block pillars are fortified and integrated into our corporate structure by the following characteristics which each of us must consistently use in our work life: Fairness Honesty Integrity and Trust

13  Loyalty  Duty  Respect  Selfless Service  Honor  Integrity  Personal Courage

14  Management commitment  Active communications  Adherence to company values  Follow regulations and implement best practices  Follow the Four Concepts of Quality: › Meet the customer’s needs › Employee involvement › Teamwork › Continuous process improvement  Train and retrain employees  Check, double check, and then re-check

15 Unless you’re the lead dog, the scenery never changes

16  Active management commitment and engagement: › Lead by example  Communications: › Mean what you say › When you say employees are your most valuable asset prove it daily › Listen › Ask questions and be able to “handle the truth” › Don’t put head in the sand nor turn a blind eye › Establish and use written Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)  Demand quality: › In all the company does › Adhere to best safety practices

17  Best practices  Consensus standards: › American National Standards Institute (ANSI) › National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)  Organizations/Associations: › American Society of Safety Engineers  Manufacturers: › Owners/Operators manuals  Insurance carriers  Lessons learned through After Action Reviews and Near Miss Investigations  Review previous Job Hazard Analysis  Checklists

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19  Money is best spent in preventing problems and errors  Active Prevention: › Establish and implement effective procedures and processes that prevent problems (SOPs, checklist, etc.)  Effective Appraisal: › Internal checks  Improvements: › Corrective action taken  Value Added: › Activities of persons or things that make the service more desirable to the customer › Produces cost savings to both the company and the customer

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21  The approach to improvement is very simple. Evaluate the work tasks and eliminate the steps that do not add value. Then, determine the best way to perform the total work process.

22  Effective: doing the right thing  Efficient : doing the thing right  Effective + Efficient = Doing the right thing right

23  Customers benefit from a project executed in a consistent manner by qualified personnel using proven best practices  Checks and balances reduce the chance for error  Repetition leads to higher efficiency  Employees understand roles and responsibilities  Personnel retraining is minimized  New team members can contribute quicker  People can move between projects easier  Project requirements learning curve is lowered

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49  Workplace safety delivers a return: › A Liberty Mutual survey shows 61 percent of executives say $3 or more are saved for each $1 invested in workplace safety.

50 Indirect Cost :  Clean up time  Investigation costs  Legal fees  Production delays  Delivery delays  Increase insurance cost  Training/Orientating new employees  Unhappy customers  Citations Direct Cost:  Medical costs › Treatment › Hospitalization › Prescription drugs  Ambulance service  Equipment damage

51  Indirect Costs V.S. Direct Costs › 4:1 is commonly accepted  The National Safety Council › 3 to 10 times the direct costs of accidents  A Construction Industry Institute study found the indirect expense of injuries ranged from 2 to 20 times the direct expense. › 2:1 excludes third party law suits › 20:1 includes third party law suits

52  The ballistic eye protection worn by 1LT Anthony Aguilar stopped the shrapnel and saved his eyesight and perhaps prevented even more serious injuries.

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55 Notice how most injuries occur on the lower left leg and the left arm. Be sure to protect those areas well.

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59  In 2006, the estimated direct U.S. workers compensation costs for the most disabling workplace injuries and illnesses was almost $1 BILLION per week  Total Spent: $48.6 Billion

60  Overexertion: 25.7% = $12.4 billion  Fall on Same Level: 13.3% = $6.4 billion  Fall to Lower Level: 10.8% = $5.3 billion  Bodily Reaction: 10.0% = $4.8 billion  Struck by Object: 8.9% = $4.3 billion

61  Struck Against Object:5.1% = $2.5 billion  Highway Incident: 4.9% = $2.4 billion  Caught In/Between: 4.4% = $2.1billion  Repetitive Motion:4.0% = $2.0 billion  Assaults/Violent Acts:0.9% = $0.4 billion

62 1921 Unintentional Deaths  Deaths from Unintentional Injury 75,500  Falls 11,800  Automobiles 9,800  Burns 7, Unintentional Deaths  Deaths from Unintentional Injury120,000  Auto Accidents 44,700  Poisoning 25,300  Falls 21,200

63  Wage & Productivity Losses$329.8 Billion  Administrative Expense$134.5 Billion  Medical Expenses$116.3 Billion  Motor-Vehicle Damage$ 41.7 Billion  Uninsured Employer Cost$ 18.5 Billion  Fire Loss$ 11.3 Billion

64  Costs by class of injury: › Total Costs$652.1 Billion › Motor Vehicles$258.6 Billion › Work Related$164.7 Billion › Home$150.1 Billion › Public Non-Motor Veh$101.8 Billion

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66 In 1970, Congress considered these annual figures: › Job-related accidents accounted for more than 14,000 worker deaths › Nearly 2-1/2 million workers were disabled › Estimated new cases of occupational diseases totaled 300,000

67 Public Law OSH Act Occupational Safety & Health Act of 1970

68 "... to assure so far as possible every working man and woman in the Nation safe and healthful working conditions and to preserve our human resources."

69  Most private sector employees  Does not cover the self-employed or immediate members of farm families that do not employ outside workers  Coverage is provided directly by federal OSHA or through an OSHA-approved state program

70  OSH Act encourages states to develop and operate, under OSHA guidance, state S&H plans  OSHA funds up to 50 percent of approved program's cost  Must be at least as effective as the federal program  Must cover state and local government employees  May limit coverage to public sector  Must keep pace with federal standards

71  OSHA provisions do not apply to state and local governments in their role as employers  Any state seeking OSHA approval for its own S&H program must provide coverage for these employees  State plans may also cover only public sector employees

72  OSHA web site - OSHA standards, interpretations, directives (www.osha.gov)www.osha.gov  Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) in public libraries and through GPO  Federal Register in public libraries or at GPO web site  CD-ROM subscription through U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO)

73  Consensus Standards › American National Standards Institute (ANSI) › American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) › National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) › National Electrical Code (NEC)  National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)  Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD)  Best Industry Practices  The Insurance Industry  Associations

74  General Industry  Construction  Maritime  Agriculture

75  Falls  Scaffolds  Stairways & Ladders  Machines and equipment  Electrical  Excavation  Machine guarding  Chemical exposures

76  Each employer "shall furnish... a place of employment which is free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm to his employees."

77 Safety is everyone’s responsibility… …because sometimes your safety depends on others.

78 Insurance IndustryRegulators

79  Falls from elevations  Electrical  Caught Between/In › Unguarded machinery/equipment › Trenches  Struck By › Falling objects › Vehicles/equipment

80 FY 2006  9 Struck By  4 Caught In/Between  2 Falls  0 Electrical 15 Total FY 2007  8 Struck By  2 Caught In/Between  2 Falls  0 Electrical 12 Total

81 FY 2008  7 Struck By  0 Caught In/Between  1 Falls  3 Electrical 11 Total FY 2009  2 Struck By  3 Caught In/Between  0 Falls  0 Electrical 05 Total

82 DateCause of Fatality 09 Sep 08 Struck By: Vertical conveyor gate crushed EE 29 Jul 08 Electrocution: HVAC Tech energized while conducting maintenance 21 Jun 08 Fall: Iron worker fell while decking 13 May 08 Struck By: EE thrown from bucket of tractor and ran over 11 Apr 08 Struck By: EE tipped over forklift 25 Mar 08 Struck By: EE hit and ran over by forklift

83 DateCause of Fatality 07 Mar 08 Struck By: EE struck by trailer components 05 Feb 08 Electrocution: Rigger electrocuted at the load when a crane boom contacted power lines 18 Jan 08 Struck By: Logger crushed by superstructure of yarder 10 Nov 07 Struck By: EE riding ATV struck cable strung across road 23 Oct 07 Electrocution: EE electrocuted while setting power line poles

84 DateCause of Fatality 16 Sep 09 Caught In/Between: EE crushed in trench 20 May 09 Struck By: EE hit by a tree 11 May 09 Caught In/Between: EE in auger 18 Feb 09 Caught In/Between: EE caught in agitator of mixing tank 02 Jan 09 Struck By: EE thrown from CAT hay loader and crushed by machine

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86  “Our executive management views safety performance as a leading indicator of project management performance with strong correlation to quality, schedule, productivity, and financial success.”

87 Safety “The safety program is most effective when it is driven by Line Management! ”

88  Management › Top › Middle  Supervisors  Employees  Contractors Plan, Organize, Lead, Monitor, Control Support - Train, Control, Correct Learn, Follow, Report Pre-qualify, Comply, Report

89  It is the “right” thing to do  It is good for business (better safety – better projects)  Safety excellence leads to more work  Zero injury is being achieved on all types of projects

90  Top management support  Project manager “walks the talk”  Use group and corporate safety as a resource  Encourage supervisor safety certification

91 Awareness  Safety Posters  Safety Handouts  Warning Signs Recognition  Inspections  Safety Committee  Incentive Programs Top Mgmt. Support  Safety Director  Accident Investigation  Training Accountability  Safety Goals Established  Safety Activities Measured  Charge Back of Costs Culture  Safety is an Integral Part of Operations  Management Commitment  Employee Commitment

92 Safety committee

93 Toolbox meetings

94 Hazard recognition

95 JHA development

96 Daily, weekly, and monthly inspections (safety inspection checklist)

97  Demonstrated management commitment  Staffing for safety  Planning: pre-project and pre-task  Safety education: orientation and specialized training  Worker involvement  Evaluation and recognition/reward  Subcontract management  Accident/incident investigations  Drug and alcohol testing Construction Industry Institute’s 9-High Impact Techniques

98  Jan 2010: Safety Fest – Boise  Feb 2010: Safety Fest – Post Falls  Apr 2010 – Twin Falls  May 2010 – Pocatello

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