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Prepositional Phrases Mrs. Henson English III AP * Adapted from Sentence Composing for High School Students by Don Killgallon.

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Presentation on theme: "Prepositional Phrases Mrs. Henson English III AP * Adapted from Sentence Composing for High School Students by Don Killgallon."— Presentation transcript:

1 Prepositional Phrases Mrs. Henson English III AP * Adapted from Sentence Composing for High School Students by Don Killgallon

2 Overview Begins with a preposition. Ends with the object of the preposition. Used to describe people, places, and things. Sentences may contain single or consecutive prepositional phrases.

3 Common Prepositions In Before After At Down Across Inside Outside Between Within Behind On By Under Around Down Into Against Near Through To Like Except Over Up Without With Toward Of For With In case of In spite of Underneath In between In front of Beside

4 Important!! Prepositions serve as either an adjective or adverb in a sentence. Just as with modifiers, prepositional phrases MUST be placed in close proximity to the item being modified. If not placed properly, your sentence will have reference problems and be confusing to your reader!!!

5 Models Without Prepositions All children grow up. He groped out and began to sob. With Prepositions All children, except one, grow up. J.M. Barrie, Peter Pan He groped out for me with both of his own arms, like a drowning man, and began to sob against my stomach. Stephen King, “The Mouse on the Mile”

6 Placement of Prepositional Phrases Single Phrases – With a quick, guilty hand, she covered the tear, her shoulders bunching to hide her face. – Zenna Henderson, The Believing Child Consecutive Phrases – In a hole in the ground, there lived a hobbit. – J.R.R. Tolkein, The Hobbit Sentence Openers – Through the fence, between the curling flower spaces, I could see them hitting. – William Faulkner, The Sound and the Fury

7 Placement of Prepositional Phrases Subject-Verb Splits – Bearded men, in sad-colored garments and gray, steeple-crowned hats, intermixed with women. – Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter Sentence Closers – The sea is high again today, with a thrilling flush of wind. – Lawrence Durrell, Justine

8 Unscrambling #1 A.across the ripples B.it was morning C.and the new sun sparkled gold D.of a gentle sea It was morning and the new sun sparkled gold across the ripples of a gentle sea. -Richard Bach, Jonathon Livingston Seagull

9 Unscrambling #2 A.the boy felt good B.in his mouth C.of ham and biscuit D.with the flavor With the flavor of ham and biscuit in his mouth, the boy felt good. -William H. Armstrong, Sounder

10 Unscrambling #3 A.in one of Colin’s books B.with the ivy behind her C.of Colin’s books D.she was E.and with her nice fresh face smiling across the greenery F.with the sunlight through the trees G.dappling her long blue cloak H.like a softly colored illustration With the ivy behind her, with the sunlight through the trees dappling her long blue cloak, and with her nice fresh face smiling across the greenery, she was like a softly colored illustration in one of Colin’s books. -Frances Hodgson Burnett, The Secret Garden

11 Prepositions Practice Practice 2 – Unscramble each set of sentence parts to create 2 different sentences. – Write 1 sentence of your own imitating each of the sentences found in the “Other Models” section Practice 3 – Combine each set of sentence parts into 1 sentence which imitates the model. – Then write 1 sentence of your own imitating each of the models.


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