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GMMP 2015 T RAINING MODULE A guide to the radio monitoring materials Section 2: Reporters and People in the News.

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Presentation on theme: "GMMP 2015 T RAINING MODULE A guide to the radio monitoring materials Section 2: Reporters and People in the News."— Presentation transcript:

1 GMMP 2015 T RAINING MODULE A guide to the radio monitoring materials Section 2: Reporters and People in the News

2 A N INTERNATIONAL INITIATIVE … Because media monitoring is taking place in over 100 different countries across the globe, it is critical that all participants have a uniform understanding of the way the monitoring materials should be applied. Please use this presentation as a means of familiarising yourself with the materials and becoming comfortable with their application.

3 G UIDELINES In this section you will need to code: All journalists and reporters, in this case, Chris Uhlmann and Zoe Daniel. All people that appear in the story, in this case Jemal Ahmet, Alecia Murphy and Mary Agostino. Each ‘person in the news’ is given their own row on the coding sheet in columns 7 to 13. CHRIS UHLMANN: A new household survey of outer Melbourne shows that as many as one in 10 families could not afford food at least once over the last 12 months. Community organisations operating in so called growth corridors are reporting a spike in demand from middle class families struggling to pay utility bills and put food on the table. Demand for financial help has increased more than 100 per cent in the last year and support services are turning away twice as many people as they're able to help. Zoe Daniel has this report. ZOE DANIEL: Whittlesea Community Connections is the first port of call for many families in crisis. And in the last six months it's seen a 40 per cent jump in need from middle class areas where people are struggling so much with costs that they can't afford food. So if the main thing you're struggling with at the moment is your utility bills if you could bring them in. The service can only see 30 or 40 people a week; twice that number are turned away. Appointments are now taken only by phone because dozens were sleeping outside overnight to get a slot. Chief executive Jemal Ahmet. JEMAL AHMET: I think people are sold the dream as well of moving into a new Greenfield development, a new housing estate, thinking that you know, their problems will be resolved. When they get there they find that there's one road into the housing estate and one road out. There's not a local school; there's no public transport; there's no local services and the dream they're sold about moving into an outer growth suburb with a new house and a garden, it very quickly deflates. ZOE DANIEL: The city of Whittlesea covers almost 500 square kilometres and will see its population grow from 186,000 to 300,000 by Its issues mirror those in growth areas on city fringes around Australia: roads, public transport, health and education services are not keeping up. Alecia Murphy and her husband moved to the area nine years ago to raise their three children. ALECIA MURPHY: My eldest son, now is in year 9, but was in actual kinder when we first moved in and I would have thought that in between kinder to year 9, a high school would have developed in the immediate area, but those facilities just haven't come. ZOE DANIEL: She says the extra costs associated with transporting children long distances to school and activities add an extra layer of pressure. ALECIA MURPHY: As well as your own pressures of living with your utilities and your food bills and your mortgage stress. I work part time and if I didn't work part time we wouldn't be able to live off my husband's wage. ZOE DANIEL: Councils are increasingly frustrated with the lack of long term infrastructure planning. City of Whittlesea's Mary Agostino confirms the resulting costs mean even those on middle incomes are now struggling. The council's latest household survey shows 14 per cent of respondents in the council's wealthier areas are experiencing food insecurity. MARY AGOSTINO: You've got these really high income earning families, yet mortgage pressures and all that goes with living there is putting pressure on food security, children's outcomes and a whole range of other social issues. So it's something quite different to what we've experienced in the past. CHRIS UHLMAN: Mary Agostino from the City of Whittlesea; Zoe Daniel was the reporter.

4 Q UESTIONS 5 & 6 This is where the news anchors and reporters are coded. The news anchor is a man. In this case, code ‘1’ for role and ‘2’ for sex. CHRIS UHLMANN: A new household survey of outer Melbourne shows that as many as one in 10 families could not afford food at least once over the last 12 months. Community organisations operating in so called growth corridors are reporting a spike in demand from middle class families struggling to pay utility bills and put food on the table. Demand for financial help has increased more than 100 per cent in the last year and support services are turning away twice as many people as they're able to help. Zoe Daniel has this report. ZOE DANIEL: Whittlesea Community Connections is the first port of call for many families in crisis. And in the last six months it's seen a 40 per cent jump in need from middle class areas where people are struggling so much with costs that they can't afford food. So if the main thing you're struggling with at the moment is your utility bills if you could bring them in. The service can only see 30 or 40 people a week; twice that number are turned away. Appointments are now taken only by phone because dozens were sleeping outside overnight to get a slot. Chief executive Jemal Ahmet. JEMAL AHMET: I think people are sold the dream as well of moving into a new Greenfield development, a new housing estate, thinking that you know, their problems will be resolved. When they get there they find that there's one road into the housing estate and one road out. There's not a local school; there's no public transport; there's no local services and the dream they're sold about moving into an outer growth suburb with a new house and a garden, it very quickly deflates. ZOE DANIEL: The city of Whittlesea covers almost 500 square kilometres and will see its population grow from 186,000 to 300,000 by Its issues mirror those in growth areas on city fringes around Australia: roads, public transport, health and education services are not keeping up. Alecia Murphy and her husband moved to the area nine years ago to raise their three children. ALECIA MURPHY: My eldest son, now is in year 9, but was in actual kinder when we first moved in and I would have thought that in between kinder to year 9, a high school would have developed in the immediate area, but those facilities just haven't come. ZOE DANIEL: She says the extra costs associated with transporting children long distances to school and activities add an extra layer of pressure. ALECIA MURPHY: As well as your own pressures of living with your utilities and your food bills and your mortgage stress. I work part time and if I didn't work part time we wouldn't be able to live off my husband's wage. ZOE DANIEL: Councils are increasingly frustrated with the lack of long term infrastructure planning. City of Whittlesea's Mary Agostino confirms the resulting costs mean even those on middle incomes are now struggling. The council's latest household survey shows 14 per cent of respondents in the council's wealthier areas are experiencing food insecurity. MARY AGOSTINO: You've got these really high income earning families, yet mortgage pressures and all that goes with living there is putting pressure on food security, children's outcomes and a whole range of other social issues. So it's something quite different to what we've experienced in the past. CHRIS UHLMAN: Mary Agostino from the City of Whittlesea; Zoe Daniel was the reporter. The reporter is a woman. In this case, code ‘2’ for role and ‘1’ for sex. Chris Uhlmann 5 - Role : Code 1 for ‘Anchor’ 6 - Sex : Code 2 for ‘male’ Zoe Daniel 5 - Role : Code 2 for ‘Reporter’ 6 - Sex : Code 1 for ‘female’

5 What`s Jemal Ahmet`s sex? 1. Female 2. Male 3. Other: transgender, transsexual 4. Do not know Q UESTION 7 CHRIS UHLMANN: A new household survey of outer Melbourne shows that as many as one in 10 families could not afford food at least once over the last 12 months. Community organisations operating in so called growth corridors are reporting a spike in demand from middle class families struggling to pay utility bills and put food on the table. Demand for financial help has increased more than 100 per cent in the last year and support services are turning away twice as many people as they're able to help. Zoe Daniel has this report. ZOE DANIEL: Whittlesea Community Connections is the first port of call for many families in crisis. And in the last six months it's seen a 40 per cent jump in need from middle class areas where people are struggling so much with costs that they can't afford food. So if the main thing you're struggling with at the moment is your utility bills if you could bring them in. The service can only see 30 or 40 people a week; twice that number are turned away. Appointments are now taken only by phone because dozens were sleeping outside overnight to get a slot. Chief executive Jemal Ahmet. JEMAL AHMET: I think people are sold the dream as well of moving into a new Greenfield development, a new housing estate, thinking that you know, their problems will be resolved. When they get there they find that there's one road into the housing estate and one road out. There's not a local school; there's no public transport; there's no local services and the dream they're sold about moving into an outer growth suburb with a new house and a garden, it very quickly deflates. ZOE DANIEL: The city of Whittlesea covers almost 500 square kilometres and will see its population grow from 186,000 to 300,000 by Its issues mirror those in growth areas on city fringes around Australia: roads, public transport, health and education services are not keeping up. Alecia Murphy and her husband moved to the area nine years ago to raise their three children. ALECIA MURPHY: My eldest son, now is in year 9, but was in actual kinder when we first moved in and I would have thought that in between kinder to year 9, a high school would have developed in the immediate area, but those facilities just haven't come. ZOE DANIEL: She says the extra costs associated with transporting children long distances to school and activities add an extra layer of pressure. ALECIA MURPHY: As well as your own pressures of living with your utilities and your food bills and your mortgage stress. I work part time and if I didn't work part time we wouldn't be able to live off my husband's wage. ZOE DANIEL: Councils are increasingly frustrated with the lack of long term infrastructure planning. City of Whittlesea's Mary Agostino confirms the resulting costs mean even those on middle incomes are now struggling. The council's latest household survey shows 14 per cent of respondents in the council's wealthier areas are experiencing food insecurity. MARY AGOSTINO: You've got these really high income earning families, yet mortgage pressures and all that goes with living there is putting pressure on food security, children's outcomes and a whole range of other social issues. So it's something quite different to what we've experienced in the past. CHRIS UHLMAN: Mary Agostino from the City of Whittlesea; Zoe Daniel was the reporter. There are 3 people to code: Jemal Ahmet, Alecia Murphy and Mary Agostino. Enter the relevant codes for each one of them on a separate line of the coding sheet. Code the people in the order that they appear in the story. Jemal Ahmet is a man. Code 2 There are 3 people to code: Jemal Ahmet, Alecia Murphy and Mary Agostino.

6 What is Jemal Ahmet`s occupation or position? 02. Government, politician, minister, spokesperson Q UESTION 8 CHRIS UHLMANN: A new household survey of outer Melbourne shows that as many as one in 10 families could not afford food at least once over the last 12 months. Community organisations operating in so called growth corridors are reporting a spike in demand from middle class families struggling to pay utility bills and put food on the table. Demand for financial help has increased more than 100 per cent in the last year and support services are turning away twice as many people as they're able to help. Zoe Daniel has this report. ZOE DANIEL: Whittlesea Community Connections is the first port of call for many families in crisis. And in the last six months it's seen a 40 per cent jump in need from middle class areas where people are struggling so much with costs that they can't afford food. So if the main thing you're struggling with at the moment is your utility bills if you could bring them in. The service can only see 30 or 40 people a week; twice that number are turned away. Appointments are now taken only by phone because dozens were sleeping outside overnight to get a slot. Chief executive Jemal Ahmet. JEMAL AHMET: I think people are sold the dream as well of moving into a new Greenfield development, a new housing estate, thinking that you know, their problems will be resolved. When they get there they find that there's one road into the housing estate and one road out. There's not a local school; there's no public transport; there's no local services and the dream they're sold about moving into an outer growth suburb with a new house and a garden, it very quickly deflates. ZOE DANIEL: The city of Whittlesea covers almost 500 square kilometres and will see its population grow from 186,000 to 300,000 by Its issues mirror those in growth areas on city fringes around Australia: roads, public transport, health and education services are not keeping up. Alecia Murphy and her husband moved to the area nine years ago to raise their three children. ALECIA MURPHY: My eldest son, now is in year 9, but was in actual kinder when we first moved in and I would have thought that in between kinder to year 9, a high school would have developed in the immediate area, but those facilities just haven't come. ZOE DANIEL: She says the extra costs associated with transporting children long distances to school and activities add an extra layer of pressure. ALECIA MURPHY: As well as your own pressures of living with your utilities and your food bills and your mortgage stress. I work part time and if I didn't work part time we wouldn't be able to live off my husband's wage. ZOE DANIEL: Councils are increasingly frustrated with the lack of long term infrastructure planning. City of Whittlesea's Mary Agostino confirms the resulting costs mean even those on middle incomes are now struggling. The council's latest household survey shows 14 per cent of respondents in the council's wealthier areas are experiencing food insecurity. MARY AGOSTINO: You've got these really high income earning families, yet mortgage pressures and all that goes with living there is putting pressure on food security, children's outcomes and a whole range of other social issues. So it's something quite different to what we've experienced in the past. CHRIS UHLMAN: Mary Agostino from the City of Whittlesea; Zoe Daniel was the reporter. The best occupation or position possible for Jemal Ahmet is code 16: activist or worker in civil society organization 12. Office or service worker, non-management worker 16. Activist or worker in civil society organization, … 27. Other

7 In what function or capacity is Jemal Ahmet included in the story? 1. Subject 2. Spokesperson 4. Personal experience Q UESTION 9 CHRIS UHLMANN: A new household survey of outer Melbourne shows that as many as one in 10 families could not afford food at least once over the last 12 months. Community organisations operating in so called growth corridors are reporting a spike in demand from middle class families struggling to pay utility bills and put food on the table. Demand for financial help has increased more than 100 per cent in the last year and support services are turning away twice as many people as they're able to help. Zoe Daniel has this report. ZOE DANIEL: Whittlesea Community Connections is the first port of call for many families in crisis. And in the last six months it's seen a 40 per cent jump in need from middle class areas where people are struggling so much with costs that they can't afford food. So if the main thing you're struggling with at the moment is your utility bills if you could bring them in. The service can only see 30 or 40 people a week; twice that number are turned away. Appointments are now taken only by phone because dozens were sleeping outside overnight to get a slot. Chief executive Jemal Ahmet. JEMAL AHMET: I think people are sold the dream as well of moving into a new Greenfield development, a new housing estate, thinking that you know, their problems will be resolved. When they get there they find that there's one road into the housing estate and one road out. There's not a local school; there's no public transport; there's no local services and the dream they're sold about moving into an outer growth suburb with a new house and a garden, it very quickly deflates. ZOE DANIEL: The city of Whittlesea covers almost 500 square kilometres and will see its population grow from 186,000 to 300,000 by Its issues mirror those in growth areas on city fringes around Australia: roads, public transport, health and education services are not keeping up. Alecia Murphy and her husband moved to the area nine years ago to raise their three children. ALECIA MURPHY: My eldest son, now is in year 9, but was in actual kinder when we first moved in and I would have thought that in between kinder to year 9, a high school would have developed in the immediate area, but those facilities just haven't come. ZOE DANIEL: She says the extra costs associated with transporting children long distances to school and activities add an extra layer of pressure. ALECIA MURPHY: As well as your own pressures of living with your utilities and your food bills and your mortgage stress. I work part time and if I didn't work part time we wouldn't be able to live off my husband's wage. ZOE DANIEL: Councils are increasingly frustrated with the lack of long term infrastructure planning. City of Whittlesea's Mary Agostino confirms the resulting costs mean even those on middle incomes are now struggling. The council's latest household survey shows 14 per cent of respondents in the council's wealthier areas are experiencing food insecurity. MARY AGOSTINO: You've got these really high income earning families, yet mortgage pressures and all that goes with living there is putting pressure on food security, children's outcomes and a whole range of other social issues. So it's something quite different to what we've experienced in the past. CHRIS UHLMAN: Mary Agostino from the City of Whittlesea; Zoe Daniel was the reporter. Jemal Ahmet is a Spokesperson (for Whittlesea Community Connections) Code 2 0. Do not know 5. Eye witness 6. Popular opinion 7. Other 3. Expert or commentator

8 Is Jemal family role given? At any point within the story, in terms of his family relationships (e.g. father, son, husband, brother etc.) 1.Yes 2.No Q UESTION 10 CHRIS UHLMANN: A new household survey of outer Melbourne shows that as many as one in 10 families could not afford food at least once over the last 12 months. Community organisations operating in so called growth corridors are reporting a spike in demand from middle class families struggling to pay utility bills and put food on the table. Demand for financial help has increased more than 100 per cent in the last year and support services are turning away twice as many people as they're able to help. Zoe Daniel has this report. ZOE DANIEL: Whittlesea Community Connections is the first port of call for many families in crisis. And in the last six months it's seen a 40 per cent jump in need from middle class areas where people are struggling so much with costs that they can't afford food. So if the main thing you're struggling with at the moment is your utility bills if you could bring them in. The service can only see 30 or 40 people a week; twice that number are turned away. Appointments are now taken only by phone because dozens were sleeping outside overnight to get a slot. Chief executive Jemal Ahmet. JEMAL AHMET: I think people are sold the dream as well of moving into a new Greenfield development, a new housing estate, thinking that you know, their problems will be resolved. When they get there they find that there's one road into the housing estate and one road out. There's not a local school; there's no public transport; there's no local services and the dream they're sold about moving into an outer growth suburb with a new house and a garden, it very quickly deflates. ZOE DANIEL: The city of Whittlesea covers almost 500 square kilometres and will see its population grow from 186,000 to 300,000 by Its issues mirror those in growth areas on city fringes around Australia: roads, public transport, health and education services are not keeping up. Alecia Murphy and her husband moved to the area nine years ago to raise their three children. ALECIA MURPHY: My eldest son, now is in year 9, but was in actual kinder when we first moved in and I would have thought that in between kinder to year 9, a high school would have developed in the immediate area, but those facilities just haven't come. ZOE DANIEL: She says the extra costs associated with transporting children long distances to school and activities add an extra layer of pressure. ALECIA MURPHY: As well as your own pressures of living with your utilities and your food bills and your mortgage stress. I work part time and if I didn't work part time we wouldn't be able to live off my husband's wage. ZOE DANIEL: Councils are increasingly frustrated with the lack of long term infrastructure planning. City of Whittlesea's Mary Agostino confirms the resulting costs mean even those on middle incomes are now struggling. The council's latest household survey shows 14 per cent of respondents in the council's wealthier areas are experiencing food insecurity. MARY AGOSTINO: You've got these really high income earning families, yet mortgage pressures and all that goes with living there is putting pressure on food security, children's outcomes and a whole range of other social issues. So it's something quite different to what we've experienced in the past. CHRIS UHLMAN: Mary Agostino from the City of Whittlesea; Zoe Daniel was the reporter. At no point is Jemal described in terms of a family relationship.

9 Does the story clearly identify Jemal either as a victim or a survivor? Q UESTION 11 1.Yes 2.No* CHRIS UHLMANN: A new household survey of outer Melbourne shows that as many as one in 10 families could not afford food at least once over the last 12 months. Community organisations operating in so called growth corridors are reporting a spike in demand from middle class families struggling to pay utility bills and put food on the table. Demand for financial help has increased more than 100 per cent in the last year and support services are turning away twice as many people as they're able to help. Zoe Daniel has this report. ZOE DANIEL: Whittlesea Community Connections is the first port of call for many families in crisis. And in the last six months it's seen a 40 per cent jump in need from middle class areas where people are struggling so much with costs that they can't afford food. So if the main thing you're struggling with at the moment is your utility bills if you could bring them in. The service can only see 30 or 40 people a week; twice that number are turned away. Appointments are now taken only by phone because dozens were sleeping outside overnight to get a slot. Chief executive Jemal Ahmet. JEMAL AHMET: I think people are sold the dream as well of moving into a new Greenfield development, a new housing estate, thinking that you know, their problems will be resolved. When they get there they find that there's one road into the housing estate and one road out. There's not a local school; there's no public transport; there's no local services and the dream they're sold about moving into an outer growth suburb with a new house and a garden, it very quickly deflates. ZOE DANIEL: The city of Whittlesea covers almost 500 square kilometres and will see its population grow from 186,000 to 300,000 by Its issues mirror those in growth areas on city fringes around Australia: roads, public transport, health and education services are not keeping up. Alecia Murphy and her husband moved to the area nine years ago to raise their three children. ALECIA MURPHY: My eldest son, now is in year 9, but was in actual kinder when we first moved in and I would have thought that in between kinder to year 9, a high school would have developed in the immediate area, but those facilities just haven't come. ZOE DANIEL: She says the extra costs associated with transporting children long distances to school and activities add an extra layer of pressure. ALECIA MURPHY: As well as your own pressures of living with your utilities and your food bills and your mortgage stress. I work part time and if I didn't work part time we wouldn't be able to live off my husband's wage. ZOE DANIEL: Councils are increasingly frustrated with the lack of long term infrastructure planning. City of Whittlesea's Mary Agostino confirms the resulting costs mean even those on middle incomes are now struggling. The council's latest household survey shows 14 per cent of respondents in the council's wealthier areas are experiencing food insecurity. MARY AGOSTINO: You've got these really high income earning families, yet mortgage pressures and all that goes with living there is putting pressure on food security, children's outcomes and a whole range of other social issues. So it's something quite different to what we've experienced in the past. CHRIS UHLMAN: Mary Agostino from the City of Whittlesea; Zoe Daniel was the reporter. Jemal Ahmet is not depicted as a victim. Code a person as a victim either if the word 'victim' is used to describe her/him, or if the story implies that the person is a victim - e.g. by using language or images that evoke particular emotions such as shock, horror, pity for the person. * If you select 2 in q.11 skip to q.14 *Complete Q.12 and Q.13 if the person is described as victim or survivor

10 Q UESTION 12 Does the story clearly identify Jemal as a victim? Skip this question Does the story clearly identify Jemal as a survivor? Skip this question CHRIS UHLMANN: A new household survey of outer Melbourne shows that as many as one in 10 families could not afford food at least once over the last 12 months. Community organisations operating in so called growth corridors are reporting a spike in demand from middle class families struggling to pay utility bills and put food on the table. Demand for financial help has increased more than 100 per cent in the last year and support services are turning away twice as many people as they're able to help. Zoe Daniel has this report. ZOE DANIEL: Whittlesea Community Connections is the first port of call for many families in crisis. And in the last six months it's seen a 40 per cent jump in need from middle class areas where people are struggling so much with costs that they can't afford food. So if the main thing you're struggling with at the moment is your utility bills if you could bring them in. The service can only see 30 or 40 people a week; twice that number are turned away. Appointments are now taken only by phone because dozens were sleeping outside overnight to get a slot. Chief executive Jemal Ahmet. JEMAL AHMET: I think people are sold the dream as well of moving into a new Greenfield development, a new housing estate, thinking that you know, their problems will be resolved. When they get there they find that there's one road into the housing estate and one road out. There's not a local school; there's no public transport; there's no local services and the dream they're sold about moving into an outer growth suburb with a new house and a garden, it very quickly deflates. ZOE DANIEL: The city of Whittlesea covers almost 500 square kilometres and will see its population grow from 186,000 to 300,000 by Its issues mirror those in growth areas on city fringes around Australia: roads, public transport, health and education services are not keeping up. Alecia Murphy and her husband moved to the area nine years ago to raise their three children. ALECIA MURPHY: My eldest son, now is in year 9, but was in actual kinder when we first moved in and I would have thought that in between kinder to year 9, a high school would have developed in the immediate area, but those facilities just haven't come. ZOE DANIEL: She says the extra costs associated with transporting children long distances to school and activities add an extra layer of pressure. ALECIA MURPHY: As well as your own pressures of living with your utilities and your food bills and your mortgage stress. I work part time and if I didn't work part time we wouldn't be able to live off my husband's wage. ZOE DANIEL: Councils are increasingly frustrated with the lack of long term infrastructure planning. City of Whittlesea's Mary Agostino confirms the resulting costs mean even those on middle incomes are now struggling. The council's latest household survey shows 14 per cent of respondents in the council's wealthier areas are experiencing food insecurity. MARY AGOSTINO: You've got these really high income earning families, yet mortgage pressures and all that goes with living there is putting pressure on food security, children's outcomes and a whole range of other social issues. So it's something quite different to what we've experienced in the past. CHRIS UHLMAN: Mary Agostino from the City of Whittlesea; Zoe Daniel was the reporter. Since we answered 2, No for question 11, we skip questions 12 and 13 Q UESTION 13

11 What is Alecia’s sex? 1. Female 2. Male 3. Other: transgender, transsexual 4. Do not know Q UESTION 7 CHRIS UHLMANN: A new household survey of outer Melbourne shows that as many as one in 10 families could not afford food at least once over the last 12 months. Community organisations operating in so called growth corridors are reporting a spike in demand from middle class families struggling to pay utility bills and put food on the table. Demand for financial help has increased more than 100 per cent in the last year and support services are turning away twice as many people as they're able to help. Zoe Daniel has this report. ZOE DANIEL: Whittlesea Community Connections is the first port of call for many families in crisis. And in the last six months it's seen a 40 per cent jump in need from middle class areas where people are struggling so much with costs that they can't afford food. So if the main thing you're struggling with at the moment is your utility bills if you could bring them in. The service can only see 30 or 40 people a week; twice that number are turned away. Appointments are now taken only by phone because dozens were sleeping outside overnight to get a slot. Chief executive Jemal Ahmet. JEMAL AHMET: I think people are sold the dream as well of moving into a new Greenfield development, a new housing estate, thinking that you know, their problems will be resolved. When they get there they find that there's one road into the housing estate and one road out. There's not a local school; there's no public transport; there's no local services and the dream they're sold about moving into an outer growth suburb with a new house and a garden, it very quickly deflates. ZOE DANIEL: The city of Whittlesea covers almost 500 square kilometres and will see its population grow from 186,000 to 300,000 by Its issues mirror those in growth areas on city fringes around Australia: roads, public transport, health and education services are not keeping up. Alecia Murphy and her husband moved to the area nine years ago to raise their three children. ALECIA MURPHY: My eldest son, now is in year 9, but was in actual kinder when we first moved in and I would have thought that in between kinder to year 9, a high school would have developed in the immediate area, but those facilities just haven't come. ZOE DANIEL: She says the extra costs associated with transporting children long distances to school and activities add an extra layer of pressure. ALECIA MURPHY: As well as your own pressures of living with your utilities and your food bills and your mortgage stress. I work part time and if I didn't work part time we wouldn't be able to live off my husband's wage. ZOE DANIEL: Councils are increasingly frustrated with the lack of long term infrastructure planning. City of Whittlesea's Mary Agostino confirms the resulting costs mean even those on middle incomes are now struggling. The council's latest household survey shows 14 per cent of respondents in the council's wealthier areas are experiencing food insecurity. MARY AGOSTINO: You've got these really high income earning families, yet mortgage pressures and all that goes with living there is putting pressure on food security, children's outcomes and a whole range of other social issues. So it's something quite different to what we've experienced in the past. CHRIS UHLMAN: Mary Agostino from the City of Whittlesea; Zoe Daniel was the reporter. Proceed coding in the next row. Enter the relevant codes for the person who appears second in the story. Alecia is the second person in this story. Alecia is a woman. Code 1 The second person to code is Alecia Murphy.

12 What is Alecia’s occupation or position? 02. Government, politician, minister, spokesperson Q UESTION 8 CHRIS UHLMANN: A new household survey of outer Melbourne shows that as many as one in 10 families could not afford food at least once over the last 12 months. Community organisations operating in so called growth corridors are reporting a spike in demand from middle class families struggling to pay utility bills and put food on the table. Demand for financial help has increased more than 100 per cent in the last year and support services are turning away twice as many people as they're able to help. Zoe Daniel has this report. ZOE DANIEL: Whittlesea Community Connections is the first port of call for many families in crisis. And in the last six months it's seen a 40 per cent jump in need from middle class areas where people are struggling so much with costs that they can't afford food. So if the main thing you're struggling with at the moment is your utility bills if you could bring them in. The service can only see 30 or 40 people a week; twice that number are turned away. Appointments are now taken only by phone because dozens were sleeping outside overnight to get a slot. Chief executive Jemal Ahmet. JEMAL AHMET: I think people are sold the dream as well of moving into a new Greenfield development, a new housing estate, thinking that you know, their problems will be resolved. When they get there they find that there's one road into the housing estate and one road out. There's not a local school; there's no public transport; there's no local services and the dream they're sold about moving into an outer growth suburb with a new house and a garden, it very quickly deflates. ZOE DANIEL: The city of Whittlesea covers almost 500 square kilometres and will see its population grow from 186,000 to 300,000 by Its issues mirror those in growth areas on city fringes around Australia: roads, public transport, health and education services are not keeping up. Alecia Murphy and her husband moved to the area nine years ago to raise their three children. ALECIA MURPHY: My eldest son, now is in year 9, but was in actual kinder when we first moved in and I would have thought that in between kinder to year 9, a high school would have developed in the immediate area, but those facilities just haven't come. ZOE DANIEL: She says the extra costs associated with transporting children long distances to school and activities add an extra layer of pressure. ALECIA MURPHY: As well as your own pressures of living with your utilities and your food bills and your mortgage stress. I work part time and if I didn't work part time we wouldn't be able to live off my husband's wage. ZOE DANIEL: Councils are increasingly frustrated with the lack of long term infrastructure planning. City of Whittlesea's Mary Agostino confirms the resulting costs mean even those on middle incomes are now struggling. The council's latest household survey shows 14 per cent of respondents in the council's wealthier areas are experiencing food insecurity. MARY AGOSTINO: You've got these really high income earning families, yet mortgage pressures and all that goes with living there is putting pressure on food security, children's outcomes and a whole range of other social issues. So it's something quite different to what we've experienced in the past. CHRIS UHLMAN: Mary Agostino from the City of Whittlesea; Zoe Daniel was the reporter. The best answer for this question is Code 21: homemaker, parent 12. Office or service worker, non-management worker 21. Homemaker, parent 27. Other

13 In what function or capacity is Alecia Murphy included in the story? 1. Subject 2. Spokesperson 4. Personal experience Q UESTION 9 CHRIS UHLMANN: A new household survey of outer Melbourne shows that as many as one in 10 families could not afford food at least once over the last 12 months. Community organisations operating in so called growth corridors are reporting a spike in demand from middle class families struggling to pay utility bills and put food on the table. Demand for financial help has increased more than 100 per cent in the last year and support services are turning away twice as many people as they're able to help. Zoe Daniel has this report. ZOE DANIEL: Whittlesea Community Connections is the first port of call for many families in crisis. And in the last six months it's seen a 40 per cent jump in need from middle class areas where people are struggling so much with costs that they can't afford food. So if the main thing you're struggling with at the moment is your utility bills if you could bring them in. The service can only see 30 or 40 people a week; twice that number are turned away. Appointments are now taken only by phone because dozens were sleeping outside overnight to get a slot. Chief executive Jemal Ahmet. JEMAL AHMET: I think people are sold the dream as well of moving into a new Greenfield development, a new housing estate, thinking that you know, their problems will be resolved. When they get there they find that there's one road into the housing estate and one road out. There's not a local school; there's no public transport; there's no local services and the dream they're sold about moving into an outer growth suburb with a new house and a garden, it very quickly deflates. ZOE DANIEL: The city of Whittlesea covers almost 500 square kilometres and will see its population grow from 186,000 to 300,000 by Its issues mirror those in growth areas on city fringes around Australia: roads, public transport, health and education services are not keeping up. Alecia Murphy and her husband moved to the area nine years ago to raise their three children. ALECIA MURPHY: My eldest son, now is in year 9, but was in actual kinder when we first moved in and I would have thought that in between kinder to year 9, a high school would have developed in the immediate area, but those facilities just haven't come. ZOE DANIEL: She says the extra costs associated with transporting children long distances to school and activities add an extra layer of pressure. ALECIA MURPHY: As well as your own pressures of living with your utilities and your food bills and your mortgage stress. I work part time and if I didn't work part time we wouldn't be able to live off my husband's wage. ZOE DANIEL: Councils are increasingly frustrated with the lack of long term infrastructure planning. City of Whittlesea's Mary Agostino confirms the resulting costs mean even those on middle incomes are now struggling. The council's latest household survey shows 14 per cent of respondents in the council's wealthier areas are experiencing food insecurity. MARY AGOSTINO: You've got these really high income earning families, yet mortgage pressures and all that goes with living there is putting pressure on food security, children's outcomes and a whole range of other social issues. So it's something quite different to what we've experienced in the past. CHRIS UHLMAN: Mary Agostino from the City of Whittlesea; Zoe Daniel was the reporter. Alecia Murphy is narrating her own personal experience. 0. Do not know 5. Eye witness 6. Popular opinion 7. Other 3. Expert or commentator

14 Is Alecia family roled given? At any point within the story, in terms of his family relationships (e.g. father, son, husband, brother etc.) 1.Yes 2.No Q UESTION 10 CHRIS UHLMANN: A new household survey of outer Melbourne shows that as many as one in 10 families could not afford food at least once over the last 12 months. Community organisations operating in so called growth corridors are reporting a spike in demand from middle class families struggling to pay utility bills and put food on the table. Demand for financial help has increased more than 100 per cent in the last year and support services are turning away twice as many people as they're able to help. Zoe Daniel has this report. ZOE DANIEL: Whittlesea Community Connections is the first port of call for many families in crisis. And in the last six months it's seen a 40 per cent jump in need from middle class areas where people are struggling so much with costs that they can't afford food. So if the main thing you're struggling with at the moment is your utility bills if you could bring them in. The service can only see 30 or 40 people a week; twice that number are turned away. Appointments are now taken only by phone because dozens were sleeping outside overnight to get a slot. Chief executive Jemal Ahmet. JEMAL AHMET: I think people are sold the dream as well of moving into a new Greenfield development, a new housing estate, thinking that you know, their problems will be resolved. When they get there they find that there's one road into the housing estate and one road out. There's not a local school; there's no public transport; there's no local services and the dream they're sold about moving into an outer growth suburb with a new house and a garden, it very quickly deflates. ZOE DANIEL: The city of Whittlesea covers almost 500 square kilometres and will see its population grow from 186,000 to 300,000 by Its issues mirror those in growth areas on city fringes around Australia: roads, public transport, health and education services are not keeping up. Alecia Murphy and her husband moved to the area nine years ago to raise their three children. ALECIA MURPHY: My eldest son, now is in year 9, but was in actual kinder when we first moved in and I would have thought that in between kinder to year 9, a high school would have developed in the immediate area, but those facilities just haven't come. ZOE DANIEL: She says the extra costs associated with transporting children long distances to school and activities add an extra layer of pressure. ALECIA MURPHY: As well as your own pressures of living with your utilities and your food bills and your mortgage stress. I work part time and if I didn't work part time we wouldn't be able to live off my husband's wage. ZOE DANIEL: Councils are increasingly frustrated with the lack of long term infrastructure planning. City of Whittlesea's Mary Agostino confirms the resulting costs mean even those on middle incomes are now struggling. The council's latest household survey shows 14 per cent of respondents in the council's wealthier areas are experiencing food insecurity. MARY AGOSTINO: You've got these really high income earning families, yet mortgage pressures and all that goes with living there is putting pressure on food security, children's outcomes and a whole range of other social issues. So it's something quite different to what we've experienced in the past. CHRIS UHLMAN: Mary Agostino from the City of Whittlesea; Zoe Daniel was the reporter. Alecia Murphy is a mother. She says they moved in to the place when her eldest son was in kinder, and now he is in year nine.

15 Does the story clearly identify Alecia either as a victim or a survivor? Q UESTION 11 1.Yes 2.No* CHRIS UHLMANN: A new household survey of outer Melbourne shows that as many as one in 10 families could not afford food at least once over the last 12 months. Community organisations operating in so called growth corridors are reporting a spike in demand from middle class families struggling to pay utility bills and put food on the table. Demand for financial help has increased more than 100 per cent in the last year and support services are turning away twice as many people as they're able to help. Zoe Daniel has this report. ZOE DANIEL: Whittlesea Community Connections is the first port of call for many families in crisis. And in the last six months it's seen a 40 per cent jump in need from middle class areas where people are struggling so much with costs that they can't afford food. So if the main thing you're struggling with at the moment is your utility bills if you could bring them in. The service can only see 30 or 40 people a week; twice that number are turned away. Appointments are now taken only by phone because dozens were sleeping outside overnight to get a slot. Chief executive Jemal Ahmet. JEMAL AHMET: I think people are sold the dream as well of moving into a new Greenfield development, a new housing estate, thinking that you know, their problems will be resolved. When they get there they find that there's one road into the housing estate and one road out. There's not a local school; there's no public transport; there's no local services and the dream they're sold about moving into an outer growth suburb with a new house and a garden, it very quickly deflates. ZOE DANIEL: The city of Whittlesea covers almost 500 square kilometres and will see its population grow from 186,000 to 300,000 by Its issues mirror those in growth areas on city fringes around Australia: roads, public transport, health and education services are not keeping up. Alecia Murphy and her husband moved to the area nine years ago to raise their three children. ALECIA MURPHY: My eldest son, now is in year 9, but was in actual kinder when we first moved in and I would have thought that in between kinder to year 9, a high school would have developed in the immediate area, but those facilities just haven't come. ZOE DANIEL: She says the extra costs associated with transporting children long distances to school and activities add an extra layer of pressure. ALECIA MURPHY: As well as your own pressures of living with your utilities and your food bills and your mortgage stress. I work part time and if I didn't work part time we wouldn't be able to live off my husband's wage. ZOE DANIEL: Councils are increasingly frustrated with the lack of long term infrastructure planning. City of Whittlesea's Mary Agostino confirms the resulting costs mean even those on middle incomes are now struggling. The council's latest household survey shows 14 per cent of respondents in the council's wealthier areas are experiencing food insecurity. MARY AGOSTINO: You've got these really high income earning families, yet mortgage pressures and all that goes with living there is putting pressure on food security, children's outcomes and a whole range of other social issues. So it's something quite different to what we've experienced in the past. CHRIS UHLMAN: Mary Agostino from the City of Whittlesea; Zoe Daniel was the reporter. Alecia is not clearly identified as a victim. Code 2, No.

16 Q UESTION 12 Does the story clearly identify Alecia as a victim? Skip this question Does the story clearly identify Alecia as a survivor? Skip this question CHRIS UHLMANN: A new household survey of outer Melbourne shows that as many as one in 10 families could not afford food at least once over the last 12 months. Community organisations operating in so called growth corridors are reporting a spike in demand from middle class families struggling to pay utility bills and put food on the table. Demand for financial help has increased more than 100 per cent in the last year and support services are turning away twice as many people as they're able to help. Zoe Daniel has this report. ZOE DANIEL: Whittlesea Community Connections is the first port of call for many families in crisis. And in the last six months it's seen a 40 per cent jump in need from middle class areas where people are struggling so much with costs that they can't afford food. So if the main thing you're struggling with at the moment is your utility bills if you could bring them in. The service can only see 30 or 40 people a week; twice that number are turned away. Appointments are now taken only by phone because dozens were sleeping outside overnight to get a slot. Chief executive Jemal Ahmet. JEMAL AHMET: I think people are sold the dream as well of moving into a new Greenfield development, a new housing estate, thinking that you know, their problems will be resolved. When they get there they find that there's one road into the housing estate and one road out. There's not a local school; there's no public transport; there's no local services and the dream they're sold about moving into an outer growth suburb with a new house and a garden, it very quickly deflates. ZOE DANIEL: The city of Whittlesea covers almost 500 square kilometres and will see its population grow from 186,000 to 300,000 by Its issues mirror those in growth areas on city fringes around Australia: roads, public transport, health and education services are not keeping up. Alecia Murphy and her husband moved to the area nine years ago to raise their three children. ALECIA MURPHY: My eldest son, now is in year 9, but was in actual kinder when we first moved in and I would have thought that in between kinder to year 9, a high school would have developed in the immediate area, but those facilities just haven't come. ZOE DANIEL: She says the extra costs associated with transporting children long distances to school and activities add an extra layer of pressure. ALECIA MURPHY: As well as your own pressures of living with your utilities and your food bills and your mortgage stress. I work part time and if I didn't work part time we wouldn't be able to live off my husband's wage. ZOE DANIEL: Councils are increasingly frustrated with the lack of long term infrastructure planning. City of Whittlesea's Mary Agostino confirms the resulting costs mean even those on middle incomes are now struggling. The council's latest household survey shows 14 per cent of respondents in the council's wealthier areas are experiencing food insecurity. MARY AGOSTINO: You've got these really high income earning families, yet mortgage pressures and all that goes with living there is putting pressure on food security, children's outcomes and a whole range of other social issues. So it's something quite different to what we've experienced in the past. CHRIS UHLMAN: Mary Agostino from the City of Whittlesea; Zoe Daniel was the reporter. Skip questions 12 and 13. Q UESTION 13

17 What is Mary Agostino’s sex? 1. Female 2. Male 3. Other: transgender, transsexual 4. Do not know Q UESTION 7 CHRIS UHLMANN: A new household survey of outer Melbourne shows that as many as one in 10 families could not afford food at least once over the last 12 months. Community organisations operating in so called growth corridors are reporting a spike in demand from middle class families struggling to pay utility bills and put food on the table. Demand for financial help has increased more than 100 per cent in the last year and support services are turning away twice as many people as they're able to help. Zoe Daniel has this report. ZOE DANIEL: Whittlesea Community Connections is the first port of call for many families in crisis. And in the last six months it's seen a 40 per cent jump in need from middle class areas where people are struggling so much with costs that they can't afford food. So if the main thing you're struggling with at the moment is your utility bills if you could bring them in. The service can only see 30 or 40 people a week; twice that number are turned away. Appointments are now taken only by phone because dozens were sleeping outside overnight to get a slot. Chief executive Jemal Ahmet. JEMAL AHMET: I think people are sold the dream as well of moving into a new Greenfield development, a new housing estate, thinking that you know, their problems will be resolved. When they get there they find that there's one road into the housing estate and one road out. There's not a local school; there's no public transport; there's no local services and the dream they're sold about moving into an outer growth suburb with a new house and a garden, it very quickly deflates. ZOE DANIEL: The city of Whittlesea covers almost 500 square kilometres and will see its population grow from 186,000 to 300,000 by Its issues mirror those in growth areas on city fringes around Australia: roads, public transport, health and education services are not keeping up. Alecia Murphy and her husband moved to the area nine years ago to raise their three children. ALECIA MURPHY: My eldest son, now is in year 9, but was in actual kinder when we first moved in and I would have thought that in between kinder to year 9, a high school would have developed in the immediate area, but those facilities just haven't come. ZOE DANIEL: She says the extra costs associated with transporting children long distances to school and activities add an extra layer of pressure. ALECIA MURPHY: As well as your own pressures of living with your utilities and your food bills and your mortgage stress. I work part time and if I didn't work part time we wouldn't be able to live off my husband's wage. ZOE DANIEL: Councils are increasingly frustrated with the lack of long term infrastructure planning. City of Whittlesea's Mary Agostino confirms the resulting costs mean even those on middle incomes are now struggling. The council's latest household survey shows 14 per cent of respondents in the council's wealthier areas are experiencing food insecurity. MARY AGOSTINO: You've got these really high income earning families, yet mortgage pressures and all that goes with living there is putting pressure on food security, children's outcomes and a whole range of other social issues. So it's something quite different to what we've experienced in the past. CHRIS UHLMAN: Mary Agostino from the City of Whittlesea; Zoe Daniel was the reporter. The person appearing third in the story is Mary Agostino. Answer the same questions again. Enter the codes in the third row. Mary is a woman. Code 1 The third person to code is Mary Agostino.

18 What is Mary’s occupation or position? 3. Government employee, public servant, bureaucrat Q UESTION 8 CHRIS UHLMANN: A new household survey of outer Melbourne shows that as many as one in 10 families could not afford food at least once over the last 12 months. Community organisations operating in so called growth corridors are reporting a spike in demand from middle class families struggling to pay utility bills and put food on the table. Demand for financial help has increased more than 100 per cent in the last year and support services are turning away twice as many people as they're able to help. Zoe Daniel has this report. ZOE DANIEL: Whittlesea Community Connections is the first port of call for many families in crisis. And in the last six months it's seen a 40 per cent jump in need from middle class areas where people are struggling so much with costs that they can't afford food. So if the main thing you're struggling with at the moment is your utility bills if you could bring them in. The service can only see 30 or 40 people a week; twice that number are turned away. Appointments are now taken only by phone because dozens were sleeping outside overnight to get a slot. Chief executive Jemal Ahmet. JEMAL AHMET: I think people are sold the dream as well of moving into a new Greenfield development, a new housing estate, thinking that you know, their problems will be resolved. When they get there they find that there's one road into the housing estate and one road out. There's not a local school; there's no public transport; there's no local services and the dream they're sold about moving into an outer growth suburb with a new house and a garden, it very quickly deflates. ZOE DANIEL: The city of Whittlesea covers almost 500 square kilometres and will see its population grow from 186,000 to 300,000 by Its issues mirror those in growth areas on city fringes around Australia: roads, public transport, health and education services are not keeping up. Alecia Murphy and her husband moved to the area nine years ago to raise their three children. ALECIA MURPHY: My eldest son, now is in year 9, but was in actual kinder when we first moved in and I would have thought that in between kinder to year 9, a high school would have developed in the immediate area, but those facilities just haven't come. ZOE DANIEL: She says the extra costs associated with transporting children long distances to school and activities add an extra layer of pressure. ALECIA MURPHY: As well as your own pressures of living with your utilities and your food bills and your mortgage stress. I work part time and if I didn't work part time we wouldn't be able to live off my husband's wage. ZOE DANIEL: Councils are increasingly frustrated with the lack of long term infrastructure planning. City of Whittlesea's Mary Agostino confirms the resulting costs mean even those on middle incomes are now struggling. The council's latest household survey shows 14 per cent of respondents in the council's wealthier areas are experiencing food insecurity. MARY AGOSTINO: You've got these really high income earning families, yet mortgage pressures and all that goes with living there is putting pressure on food security, children's outcomes and a whole range of other social issues. So it's something quite different to what we've experienced in the past. CHRIS UHLMAN: Mary Agostino from the City of Whittlesea; Zoe Daniel was the reporter. The best answer here is code 3: Government employee, public servant, bureaucrat 12. Office or service worker, non-management worker 21. Homemaker, parent 27. Other

19 In what function or capacity is Mary included in the story? 1. Subject 2. Spokesperson 4. Personal experience Q UESTION 9 CHRIS UHLMANN: A new household survey of outer Melbourne shows that as many as one in 10 families could not afford food at least once over the last 12 months. Community organisations operating in so called growth corridors are reporting a spike in demand from middle class families struggling to pay utility bills and put food on the table. Demand for financial help has increased more than 100 per cent in the last year and support services are turning away twice as many people as they're able to help. Zoe Daniel has this report. ZOE DANIEL: Whittlesea Community Connections is the first port of call for many families in crisis. And in the last six months it's seen a 40 per cent jump in need from middle class areas where people are struggling so much with costs that they can't afford food. So if the main thing you're struggling with at the moment is your utility bills if you could bring them in. The service can only see 30 or 40 people a week; twice that number are turned away. Appointments are now taken only by phone because dozens were sleeping outside overnight to get a slot. Chief executive Jemal Ahmet. JEMAL AHMET: I think people are sold the dream as well of moving into a new Greenfield development, a new housing estate, thinking that you know, their problems will be resolved. When they get there they find that there's one road into the housing estate and one road out. There's not a local school; there's no public transport; there's no local services and the dream they're sold about moving into an outer growth suburb with a new house and a garden, it very quickly deflates. ZOE DANIEL: The city of Whittlesea covers almost 500 square kilometres and will see its population grow from 186,000 to 300,000 by Its issues mirror those in growth areas on city fringes around Australia: roads, public transport, health and education services are not keeping up. Alecia Murphy and her husband moved to the area nine years ago to raise their three children. ALECIA MURPHY: My eldest son, now is in year 9, but was in actual kinder when we first moved in and I would have thought that in between kinder to year 9, a high school would have developed in the immediate area, but those facilities just haven't come. ZOE DANIEL: She says the extra costs associated with transporting children long distances to school and activities add an extra layer of pressure. ALECIA MURPHY: As well as your own pressures of living with your utilities and your food bills and your mortgage stress. I work part time and if I didn't work part time we wouldn't be able to live off my husband's wage. ZOE DANIEL: Councils are increasingly frustrated with the lack of long term infrastructure planning. City of Whittlesea's Mary Agostino confirms the resulting costs mean even those on middle incomes are now struggling. The council's latest household survey shows 14 per cent of respondents in the council's wealthier areas are experiencing food insecurity. MARY AGOSTINO: You've got these really high income earning families, yet mortgage pressures and all that goes with living there is putting pressure on food security, children's outcomes and a whole range of other social issues. So it's something quite different to what we've experienced in the past. CHRIS UHLMAN: Mary Agostino from the City of Whittlesea; Zoe Daniel was the reporter. Mary Agostino is a spokesperson for the city of Whittlesea`s council. 0. Do not know 5. Eye witness 6. Popular opinion 7. Other 3. Expert or commentator

20 Is Mary’s family role given at any point in the story? 1.Yes 2.No Q UESTION 10 CHRIS UHLMANN: A new household survey of outer Melbourne shows that as many as one in 10 families could not afford food at least once over the last 12 months. Community organisations operating in so called growth corridors are reporting a spike in demand from middle class families struggling to pay utility bills and put food on the table. Demand for financial help has increased more than 100 per cent in the last year and support services are turning away twice as many people as they're able to help. Zoe Daniel has this report. ZOE DANIEL: Whittlesea Community Connections is the first port of call for many families in crisis. And in the last six months it's seen a 40 per cent jump in need from middle class areas where people are struggling so much with costs that they can't afford food. So if the main thing you're struggling with at the moment is your utility bills if you could bring them in. The service can only see 30 or 40 people a week; twice that number are turned away. Appointments are now taken only by phone because dozens were sleeping outside overnight to get a slot. Chief executive Jemal Ahmet. JEMAL AHMET: I think people are sold the dream as well of moving into a new Greenfield development, a new housing estate, thinking that you know, their problems will be resolved. When they get there they find that there's one road into the housing estate and one road out. There's not a local school; there's no public transport; there's no local services and the dream they're sold about moving into an outer growth suburb with a new house and a garden, it very quickly deflates. ZOE DANIEL: The city of Whittlesea covers almost 500 square kilometres and will see its population grow from 186,000 to 300,000 by Its issues mirror those in growth areas on city fringes around Australia: roads, public transport, health and education services are not keeping up. Alecia Murphy and her husband moved to the area nine years ago to raise their three children. ALECIA MURPHY: My eldest son, now is in year 9, but was in actual kinder when we first moved in and I would have thought that in between kinder to year 9, a high school would have developed in the immediate area, but those facilities just haven't come. ZOE DANIEL: She says the extra costs associated with transporting children long distances to school and activities add an extra layer of pressure. ALECIA MURPHY: As well as your own pressures of living with your utilities and your food bills and your mortgage stress. I work part time and if I didn't work part time we wouldn't be able to live off my husband's wage. ZOE DANIEL: Councils are increasingly frustrated with the lack of long term infrastructure planning. City of Whittlesea's Mary Agostino confirms the resulting costs mean even those on middle incomes are now struggling. The council's latest household survey shows 14 per cent of respondents in the council's wealthier areas are experiencing food insecurity. MARY AGOSTINO: You've got these really high income earning families, yet mortgage pressures and all that goes with living there is putting pressure on food security, children's outcomes and a whole range of other social issues. So it's something quite different to what we've experienced in the past. CHRIS UHLMAN: Mary Agostino from the City of Whittlesea; Zoe Daniel was the reporter. Mary’s family role is not given.

21 Does the story clearly identify Mary either as a victim or a survivor? Q UESTION 11 1.Yes 2.No* CHRIS UHLMANN: A new household survey of outer Melbourne shows that as many as one in 10 families could not afford food at least once over the last 12 months. Community organisations operating in so called growth corridors are reporting a spike in demand from middle class families struggling to pay utility bills and put food on the table. Demand for financial help has increased more than 100 per cent in the last year and support services are turning away twice as many people as they're able to help. Zoe Daniel has this report. ZOE DANIEL: Whittlesea Community Connections is the first port of call for many families in crisis. And in the last six months it's seen a 40 per cent jump in need from middle class areas where people are struggling so much with costs that they can't afford food. So if the main thing you're struggling with at the moment is your utility bills if you could bring them in. The service can only see 30 or 40 people a week; twice that number are turned away. Appointments are now taken only by phone because dozens were sleeping outside overnight to get a slot. Chief executive Jemal Ahmet. JEMAL AHMET: I think people are sold the dream as well of moving into a new Greenfield development, a new housing estate, thinking that you know, their problems will be resolved. When they get there they find that there's one road into the housing estate and one road out. There's not a local school; there's no public transport; there's no local services and the dream they're sold about moving into an outer growth suburb with a new house and a garden, it very quickly deflates. ZOE DANIEL: The city of Whittlesea covers almost 500 square kilometres and will see its population grow from 186,000 to 300,000 by Its issues mirror those in growth areas on city fringes around Australia: roads, public transport, health and education services are not keeping up. Alecia Murphy and her husband moved to the area nine years ago to raise their three children. ALECIA MURPHY: My eldest son, now is in year 9, but was in actual kinder when we first moved in and I would have thought that in between kinder to year 9, a high school would have developed in the immediate area, but those facilities just haven't come. ZOE DANIEL: She says the extra costs associated with transporting children long distances to school and activities add an extra layer of pressure. ALECIA MURPHY: As well as your own pressures of living with your utilities and your food bills and your mortgage stress. I work part time and if I didn't work part time we wouldn't be able to live off my husband's wage. ZOE DANIEL: Councils are increasingly frustrated with the lack of long term infrastructure planning. City of Whittlesea's Mary Agostino confirms the resulting costs mean even those on middle incomes are now struggling. The council's latest household survey shows 14 per cent of respondents in the council's wealthier areas are experiencing food insecurity. MARY AGOSTINO: You've got these really high income earning families, yet mortgage pressures and all that goes with living there is putting pressure on food security, children's outcomes and a whole range of other social issues. So it's something quite different to what we've experienced in the past. CHRIS UHLMAN: Mary Agostino from the City of Whittlesea; Zoe Daniel was the reporter. Mary is neither depicted as a victim nor as a survivor. Code a person as a victim either if the word 'victim' is used to describe her/him, or if the story implies that the person is a victim - e.g. by using language or images that evoke particular emotions such as shock, horror, pity for the person. * If you select 2 in q.11 skip to q.14 *Complete Q.12 and Q.13 if the person is described as victim or survivor

22 Q UESTION 12 Does the story clearly identify Mary as a victim? Skip this question Does the story clearly identify Mary as a survivor? Skip this question CHRIS UHLMANN: A new household survey of outer Melbourne shows that as many as one in 10 families could not afford food at least once over the last 12 months. Community organisations operating in so called growth corridors are reporting a spike in demand from middle class families struggling to pay utility bills and put food on the table. Demand for financial help has increased more than 100 per cent in the last year and support services are turning away twice as many people as they're able to help. Zoe Daniel has this report. ZOE DANIEL: Whittlesea Community Connections is the first port of call for many families in crisis. And in the last six months it's seen a 40 per cent jump in need from middle class areas where people are struggling so much with costs that they can't afford food. So if the main thing you're struggling with at the moment is your utility bills if you could bring them in. The service can only see 30 or 40 people a week; twice that number are turned away. Appointments are now taken only by phone because dozens were sleeping outside overnight to get a slot. Chief executive Jemal Ahmet. JEMAL AHMET: I think people are sold the dream as well of moving into a new Greenfield development, a new housing estate, thinking that you know, their problems will be resolved. When they get there they find that there's one road into the housing estate and one road out. There's not a local school; there's no public transport; there's no local services and the dream they're sold about moving into an outer growth suburb with a new house and a garden, it very quickly deflates. ZOE DANIEL: The city of Whittlesea covers almost 500 square kilometres and will see its population grow from 186,000 to 300,000 by Its issues mirror those in growth areas on city fringes around Australia: roads, public transport, health and education services are not keeping up. Alecia Murphy and her husband moved to the area nine years ago to raise their three children. ALECIA MURPHY: My eldest son, now is in year 9, but was in actual kinder when we first moved in and I would have thought that in between kinder to year 9, a high school would have developed in the immediate area, but those facilities just haven't come. ZOE DANIEL: She says the extra costs associated with transporting children long distances to school and activities add an extra layer of pressure. ALECIA MURPHY: As well as your own pressures of living with your utilities and your food bills and your mortgage stress. I work part time and if I didn't work part time we wouldn't be able to live off my husband's wage. ZOE DANIEL: Councils are increasingly frustrated with the lack of long term infrastructure planning. City of Whittlesea's Mary Agostino confirms the resulting costs mean even those on middle incomes are now struggling. The council's latest household survey shows 14 per cent of respondents in the council's wealthier areas are experiencing food insecurity. MARY AGOSTINO: You've got these really high income earning families, yet mortgage pressures and all that goes with living there is putting pressure on food security, children's outcomes and a whole range of other social issues. So it's something quite different to what we've experienced in the past. CHRIS UHLMAN: Mary Agostino from the City of Whittlesea; Zoe Daniel was the reporter. We answered 2, No in question 11. Skip questions 12 and 13. Q UESTION 13


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