Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Connect with us and ask questions during this presentation: Via at Via Twitter #TeacherLeaders.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Connect with us and ask questions during this presentation: Via at Via Twitter #TeacherLeaders."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Connect with us and ask questions during this presentation: Via e-mail at LouisianaTeacherLeaders@la.govLouisianaTeacherLeaders@la.gov Via Twitter #TeacherLeaders Louisiana Believes. 2

3 Angelle Lailhengue, St. Bernard Parish Christina Johnson, Jefferson Parish Shelia Banks, Jefferson Parish Louisiana Believes. 3 Who is on our Teacher Leader panel?

4 Educators will be aware of the instructional supports provided by the Louisiana Department of Education for the 2014- 2015 school year Louisiana Believes. 4 Objective

5 DateResources March Grades 6-8 ELA and math guidebooks List of K-12 ELA texts included in the ELA unit plans (for purchasing) April High school ELA and math guidebooks May Grades 3-5 ELA and math guidebooks ELA interactive framework PARCC assessment guides, sample items, and additional resources SLT guidance (including new 2014-15 samples) LEAP, iLEAP, End-of-Course exams, ACT, EXPLORE, & PLAN results (late May)ACT,EXPLOREPLAN June Grades K-2 ELA and math guidebooks Teacher Leader Institute in New Orleans LDOE Release Calendar

6 INSTRUCTIONAL FRAMEWORK In English language arts (ELA), students must learn to read, understand, and write and speak about grade-level texts independently. To do this, teachers must select appropriate texts and use those texts so students meet the standards, as demonstrated through ongoing assessments. To support students in developing independence with reading and communicating about complex texts, teachers should incorporate the following interconnected components into their instruction. Click here 8 to locate additional information about this interactive framework.here Whole-Class Instruction This time is for grade level instruction. Regardless of a student’s reading level, exposure to grade-level texts supports language and comprehension development necessary for continual reading growth. This plan presents sample whole-class tasks to represent how standards might be met at this grade level. Small-Group Reading This time is for supporting student needs that cannot be met during whole-class instruction. Teachers might provide: 1.intervention for students below grade level using texts at their reading level, 2.instruction for different learners using grade level texts to support whole-class instruction, 3.extension for advanced readers using challenging texts. Small-Group Writing Most writing instruction is likely to occur during whole-class time. This time is for supporting student needs that cannot be met during whole-class instruction. Teachers might provide: 1.intervention for students below grade level, 2.instruction for different learners to support whole-class instruction and meet grade-level writing standards, 3.extension for advanced writers. Independent Reading This time is for increasing the volume and range of reading that cannot be achieved through other instruction but is necessary for student growth. Teachers can: 1.support growing reading ability by allowing students to read books at their reading level. 2.encourage reading enjoyment and build reading stamina and perseverance by allowing students to select their own texts in addition to teacher-selected texts. 8 http://www.louisianabelieves.com/resources/classroom-support-toolbox/teacher-support-toolbox/lesson-assessment-planning-resources http://www.louisianabelieves.com/resources/classroom-support-toolbox/teacher-support-toolbox/lesson-as es ment-planning-resources English Language Arts, Grade 6: Hatchet 6 Online Framework

7 Sample ELA Unit Plan Grade 6 ELA Provides teachers with assessment tasks, daily instructional tasks, and support in delivering instruction Can be adapted; not required

8 UNIT: HATCHET 1 Excerpt is pending permission: http://www.parcconline.org/samples/english-language-artsliteracy/grade-6-elaliteracyht p://www.parcconline.org/samples/english-language-artsliteracy/grade-6-elaliteracy English Language Arts, Grade 6: Hatchet 8 ANCHOR TEXT Hatchet, Gary Paulsen (Literary) RELATED TEXTS Literary Texts (Fiction)  “In Which the Autumn Provides Food and Loneliness” and “In Which We All Learn About Halloween” from My Side of the Mountain, Jean Craighead George (Note: This excerpt can be found in some grade 5 basals.)  Chapters 1-2, 4, and 8-9 from The River, Gary Paulsen  Excerpt 1 from Julie of the Wolves, Jean Craighead George Informational Texts (Nonfiction)  “What Would Peter Do?” from OutdoorSafe Inc., Peter KummerfeltWhat Would Peter Do?  “Help Me make it Through the Night—Surviving a Wilderness Emergency” from New York State Conservationist, Kelly Stang (April 2012)Help Me make it Through the Night—Surviving a Wilderness Emergency  “The Practice of Slowing Down” from This I Believe, Phil PowersThe Practice of Slowing Down  “Survival by the Numbers” from OutdoorSafe Inc., Peter KummerfeltSurvival by the Numbers  “Your Story: Are You a Survivor?” from National GeographicYour Story: Are You a Survivor?  “The 25 Most Incredible Survival Stories of All Time” fromThe 25 Most Incredible Survival Stories of Al Time Outdoorlife.com, Tim MacWelch Non-print Texts (Fiction or Nonfiction) (e.g., Media, Video, Film, Music, Art, Graphics)  A Cry in the Wild, Mark Griffins (1990)  Snow Fall: The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek from The New York Times, John Branch (Website) Snow Fal : The Avalanche at Tun el Creek UNIT FOCUS This unit teaches students about survival in the face of grave danger and overwhelming odds. Students will evaluate survival stories to learn about the importance of positive thinking, slowing down to think clearly, problem solving, and constant vigilance when facing any situation, especially a life threatening one. They will also study characters in literature to learn about the struggle of man versus nature and the life lessons we can learn from others’ survival situations. Text Use: Characters, conflict, theme, and comparing and contrasting different texts Reading: RL.6.1, RL.6.2, RL.6.3, RL.6.4, RL.6.5, RL.6.6, RL.6.7, RL.6.9, RL.6.10; RI.6.1, RI.6.2, RI.6.3, RI.6.4, RI.6.6, RI.6.8, RI.6.9, RI.6.10RL.6.1, RL.6.2, RL.6.3, RL.6.4, RL.6.5, RL.6.6, RL.6.7RL.6.9RL.6.10RI.6.1, RI.6.2, RI.6.3, RI.6.4, RI.6.6, RI.6.8, RI.6.9RI.6.10 Writing: W.6.1a-d; W.6.2a-f, W.6.3a-e, W.6.4, W.6.5, W.6.7, W.6.8, W.6.9a-b, W.6.10W.6.1a-dW.6.2a-f, W.6.3a-e, W.6.4, W.6.5W.6.7, W.6.8, W.6.9a-b, W.6.10 Speaking and Listening: SL.6.1a-d, SL.6.2, SL.6.3, SL.6.4, SL.6.5, SL.6.6SL.6.1a-d, SL.6.2, SL.6.3, SL.6.4, SL.6.5, SL.6.6 Language: L.6.1a-e, L.6.2a-b, L.6.3a-b, L.6.4a, L.6.5a-c, L.6.6L.6.1a-e, L.6.2a-b, L.6.3a-b, L.6.4a, L.6.5a-c, L.6.6 CONTENTS Page 1: Text Set and Unit Focus Page 2: Unit Content Overview Pages 3-5: Summative Unit Assessments: Culminating Writing Task, Cold-Read Assessment and Extension Task Page 6: ELA Instructional Framework Pages 7-16: Text Sequence and Use for Whole-Class Instruction

9 Hatchet Unit Overview Unit Focus  Topic: Physical and emotional survival  Themes: Evaluate survival stories to learn about the importance of positive thinking, slowing down to think clearly, problem solving, and constant vigilance  Text Use: Characters, conflict, theme, and comparing and contrasting different texts Summative Unit Assessments A culminating writing task:  Evaluate character changes  Compare and contrast different texts in terms of their approaches to the topic of survival A cold-read task:  Read and understand complex texts  Write in response to text An extension task:  Collegial conversations  Conduct a short research project about the topic of survival  Read and gather information from multiple and varied sources  Evaluate and present claims Daily Tasks Daily instruction helps students read and understand text and express that understanding.  Lesson 1 Hatchet chapters 1-2 (sample tasks)  Lesson 2 Hatchet chapters 3-4  Lesson 3 Hatchet chapter 5 and “What Would Peter Do?” (sample tasks)  Lesson 4 Hatchet chapters 6-8 and “Help Me Make it Through the Night” (sample tasks)  Lesson 5 Hatchet chapters 9-10  Lesson 6 Hatchet chapters 11-13  Lesson 7 “In Which the Autumn Provides Food and Loneliness” and “In Which We All Learn About Halloween” from My Side of the Mountain  Lesson 8 Hatchet chapters 14-15 (sample tasks)  Lesson 9 Hatchet chapters 16-18 (sample tasks)  Lesson 10 Hatchet chapters 19 and “The Practice of Slowing Down”  Lesson 11 A Cry in the Wild  Lesson 12 The River chapters 1-2, 4, 8-9  Lesson 13 “Survival by the Numbers” (writing task)  Lesson 14 Julie and the Wolves (cold-read task)  Lesson 15 “The 25 Most Incredible Survival Stories of All Time” and “Your Story: Are You a Survivor?” (extension task)  Lesson 16 Snow Fall: The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek English Language Arts, Grade 6: Hatchet 9

10 SUMMATIVE UNIT ASSESSMENTS CULMINATING WRITING TASK 2 Select an event from Hatchet and identify Brian’s steps for survival. After reading “Survival by the Numbers” from OutdoorSafe Inc. by Peter Kummerfelt, compare Brian’s actions against the tips included in the article. What did Brian do to aid or hinder his survival? Then write a multiparagraph report explaining how Brian was successful and/or could have improved his situation if he had followed the steps provided in the article case studies. Conclude the report by determining the instructional value of Hatchet—does it represent useful survival tips similar to “Survival by the Numbers”? (RL.6.3, RL.6.9, W.6.10)Survival by the NumbersRL.6.3RL.6.9W.6.10 Teacher Note: Student essays should introduce and explain Brian’s approach to survival using relevant evidence from Hatchet and the informational article. (W.6.2a, b; W.6.9a-b) Student essays should use appropriate transitions, precise and grade appropriate language, a variety of sentence patterns for meaning, interest, and style, and provide a relevant conclusion that examines the instructional value of Brian’s story. (W.6.2c, d, e, f; W.6.4; L.6.3a-b, L.6.6) The essay should demonstrate proper grammar and usage (pronouns in their proper case, with clear antecedents, and in appropriate number and person), punctuation, and spelling. (L.6.1a, c, d; L.6.2b) Use peer and teacher conferencing in the process of developing the essay. (W.6.5) A model of a similar report is available here 3.W.6.2a, bW.6.9a-b(W.6.2cdefW.6.4L.6.3a-bL.6.6L.6.1a, c, dL.6.2bW.6.5here 2 Culminating Writing Task: Students express their final understanding of the anchor text and demonstrate meeting the expectations of the standards through a written essay. 3 http://www.artofmanliness.com/2010/03/11/10-wilderness-survival-lessons-from-hatchet/ http://www.artofmanlines.com/2010/03/11/10-wildernes -survival-lessons-from-hatchet/ English Language Arts, Grade 6: Hatchet 10 UNIT FOCUSUNIT ASSESSMENTDAILY TASKS What should students learn from the texts?What shows students have learned it?Which tasks helps students learn it?  Topic: Physical and emotional survival  Themes: Evaluate survival stories to learn about the importance of positive thinking, slowing down to think clearly, problem solving, and constant vigilance  Text Use: Characters, conflict, theme, and comparing and contrasting different texts This task assesses:  Evaluating character changes  Comparing and contrasting different texts in terms of their approaches to the topic of survival Read and understand text:  Lesson 1  Lesson 2  Lesson 3 (sample tasks included)  Lesson 4 (sample tasks included)  Lesson 10 Express understanding of text:  Lesson 3 (sample tasks included)  Lesson 4 (sample tasks included)  Lesson 8 (sample tasks included)  Lesson 13

11 COLD-READ TASK 4 Read the excerpt from Julie of the Wolves by Jean Craighead George independently and answer a combination of multiple-choice and constructed-response questions 5 about the text using evidence for all answers. PARCC assessment Items for these passages are available here 6. Sample PARCC question:here  In the passage, the author developed a strong character named Miyax. Think about Miyax and the details the author used to create that character. The passage ends with Miyax waiting for the black wolf to look at her. Write an original story to continue where the passage ended. In your story, be sure to use what you have learned about the character Miyax as you tell what happens to her next. (RL.6.1, RL.6.3, W.6.3a-e, W.6.4, L.6.1a-e, L.6.2a-b, L.6.3a-b)RL.6.1RL.6.3W.6.3a-eW.6.4L.6.1a-eL.6.2a-bL.6.3a-b 4 Cold-Read Assessment: Students read a text or texts independently and answer a series of multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. While the text(s) relate to the unit focus, the text(s) have been taught during the unit. Additional assessment guidance is available at http://www.louisianabelieves.com/resources/classroom-support-toolbox/teacher-support-toolbox/end-of- year- assessments.ht p://www.louisianabelieves.com/resources/classroom-sup ort-toolbox/teacher-support-toolbox/end-of-year- assessments. 5 Ensure that students have access to the complete texts as they are testing. 6 http://parcconline.org/samples/english-language-artsliteracy/grade-6-elaliteracy http://parcconline.org/samples/english-language-artsliteracy/grade-6-elaliteracy English Language Arts, Grade 6: Hatchet 11 UNIT FOCUSUNIT ASSESSMENTDAILY TASKS What should students learn from the texts?What shows students have learned it?Which tasks helps students learn it?  Topic: Physical and emotional survival  Themes: Evaluate survival stories to learn about the importance of positive thinking, slowing down to think clearly, problem solving, and constant vigilance  Text Use: Characters, conflict, theme, and comparing and contrasting different texts This task focuses on:  Reading and understanding complex texts  Writing in response to text Read and understand text:  Lesson 3 (sample tasks included)  Lesson 4 (sample tasks included)  Lesson 10 Express understanding of text:  Lesson 3 (sample tasks included)  Lesson 4 (sample tasks included)  Lesson 14 (use this task)

12 EXTENSION TASK 7 After reading and discussing “Your Story: Are You a Survivor?” as a class, divide the class into research groups and present the “The 25 Most Incredible Survival Stories of All Time” from Outdoorlife.com. Have each group select a different survival story to investigate further. (Note: Survival stories are sometimes graphic, so depending on the maturity of the students, consider limiting the list from 25 to 10.) Research the details of the story in groups, drawing on print and digital sources (assessing the credibility of each source), to identify the main action or character trait that resulted in survival. (W.6.7, W.6.8, SL.6.1b) Create a multimedia presentation that presents:Your Story: Are You a Survivor?The 25 Most Incredible Survival Stories of All TimeW.6.7W.6.8SL.6.1b  a summary of the story,  a statement of the claim (e,g., “The main character trait that resulted in this person’s survival was preparedness”),  evidence (e.g., appropriate pictures, maps, videos, quotations) and a logical explanation for why that one action or characteristic was selected, and  basic bibliographic information for sources. (W.6.1a-b, W.6.8, W.6.9b, SL.6.2, SL.6.4, SL.6.5)W.6.1abW.6.8, W.6.9bSL.6.2SL.6.4, SL.6.5 Have students evaluate each group’s content, presentation style, and use of evidence, distinguishing claims that are supported with textual evidence from claims that are not. Determine as a class what made presentations effective based on evidence from individual evaluations. (SL.6.1a, d; SL.6.3; SL.6.6)(SL.6.1adSL.6.3SL.6.6 Teacher Note: The presentations should use grade appropriate words and phrases and formal style, proper grammar and usage (pronouns in their proper case, with clear antecedents, and in appropriate number and person), punctuation, and spelling. (W.6.1c, d; L.6.1a, c, d; L.6.2a-b, L.6.2a-b, L.6.6)W.6.1cdL.6.1a, c, dL.6.2a-bL.6.2a-bL.6.6 7 Extension Task: Students connect and extend their knowledge learned through texts in the unit to engage in research or writing. The research extension task extends the concepts studied in the set so students can gain more information about concepts or topics that interest them. The writing extension task either connects several of the texts together or is narrative task related to the unit focus. English Language Arts, Grade 6: Hatchet 5 UNIT FOCUSUNIT ASSESSMENTDAILY TASKS What should students learn from the texts?What shows students have learned it?What tasks helps students learn it?  Topic: Physical and emotional survival  Themes: Evaluate survival stories to learn about the importance of positive thinking, slowing down to think clearly, problem solving, and constant vigilance  Text Use: Characters, conflict, theme, and comparing and contrasting different texts This task focuses on:  Collegial conversations  Conducting a short research project about the topic of survival  Reading and gathering information from multiple and varied sources  Evaluating and presenting claims Read and understand the text:  Lesson 3 (sample tasks included)  Lesson 4 (sample tasks included)  Lesson 7  Lesson 10 Express understanding of text:  Lesson 4 (sample tasks included)  Lesson 9 (sample tasks included)  Lesson 13  Lesson 15 (use this task)

13 TEXT SEQUENCE AND SAMPLE WHOLE-CLASS TASKS 9 Note: One lesson does not equal one day. Teachers should determine how long to take on a given lesson. This will depend on each unique class. 10 For example, use an oral-assisted reading technique (e.g., phase-cued text lessons, reading while listening to a fluent reading of the same text by another reader (either live or recorded), or paired reading in which both readers read the same text aloud) while students read a targeted passage (e.g., the plane crash in Chapter 2) several times. The goal should be for students to fluently read the passages aloud with expression. If this work is done in advance of reading one of the chapters as a whole class, one or more of the students who have demonstrated fluency could read one of the chapters aloud as the class follows along.phase-cued text lessons, 11 http://www.timrasinski.com/presentations/multidimensional_fluency_rubric_4_factors.pdf http://www.timrasinski.com/presentations/multidimensional_fluency_rubric_4_factors.pdf 12 http://www.louisianabelieves.com/resources/classroom-support-toolbox/teacher-support-toolbox/lesson-assessment-planning-resources/small-group-reading http://www.louisianabelieves.com/resources/classroom-support-toolbox/teacher-support-toolbox/lesson-as es ment-planning-resources/small-group-reading English Language Arts, Grade 6: Hatchet 7 TEXT SEQUENCETEXT USE LESSON 1 9 : Chapters 1-2 of Hatchet, Gary Paulsen TEXT DESCRIPTION: The opening chapter introduces the main character, Brian Robeson. Brian is flying as the sole passenger in a small plane flying north to Canada to visit his father when the pilot suffers a fatal heart attack. On his belt Brian has the parting gift his mother gave him, a hatchet. Once Brian realizes the pilot has died in Chapter 2, he tries to get help utilizing the radio. By the end of chapter 2 Brian realizes he is going to crash. Brian nervously starts the plane on its descent. TEXT FOCUS: In this unit students explore character and theme as it applies to the topic of survival. These chapters introduce students to the main character Brian. These chapters prepare students to begin exploring Brian’s character and understand the challenging situation he finds himself in. Reading and summarizing these chapters will help students evaluate Brian’s character and decision making with later chapters and texts. (RL.6.2, RL.6.3)RL.6.2, RL.6.3 MODEL TASKS Note for Small-Group Reading: Teachers may choose to engage struggling readers with additional readings of whole-class texts either before or after the texts have been read as a whole class. This will provide extra time for students to process the information and receive additional support through basic comprehension questions. This can help students be more prepared to participate in the whole-class discussion. Several chapters in Hatchet (i.e., Chapters 2, 3, 11, 14, and 19) include sentences that vary in sentence length and patterns (i.e., use and repetition of single-word sentences or the use of dashes) and dialogue. As such, these passages are useful for working with struggling readers on fluency and reading with expression 10. A rubric for assessing reading fluency is available here 11. Techniques for how to address fluency can be found with the ELA Instructional Framework 12.hereELA Instructional Framework LESSON 2: Chapters 3-4 of Hatchet, Gary Paulsen TEXT DESCRIPTION: In Chapters 3 and 4, Brian flies the plane into a lake realizing that is the only way to survive the plane's crash. Brian fights his way out of the plane to the surface of the lake. He emerges exhausted and passes out. While asleep Brian remembers “the secret” that he believes led to his parents’ divorce. After waking Brian realizes he is fortunate to be alive but also realizes he is facing some big challenges.

14

15 Sample Math Task Grade 7 Math Provides teachers with a great deal of support in delivering instruction including exemplar responses Can be adapted; not required

16 Mathematics Grade 7 – Instructional Task Adding and Subtracting Rational Numbers Instructional Task Overview This instructional task requires students to use addition and subtraction of rational numbers to create a budget for a school club. Standards Apply and extend previous understandings of operations with fractions to add, subtract, multiply, and divide rational numbers. 7.NS.A.1 Apply and extend previous understandings of addition and subtraction to add and subtract rational numbers; represent addition and subtraction on a horizontal or vertical number line diagram. a.Describe situations in which opposite quantities combine to make 0. For example, a hydrogen atom has 0 charge because its two constituents are oppositely charged. b.Understand p + q as the number located a distance |q| from p, in the positive or negative direction depending on whether q is positive or negative. Show that a number and its opposite have a sum of 0 (are additive inverses). Interpret sums of rational numbers by describing real-world contexts. c.Understand subtraction of rational numbers as adding the additive inverse, p – q = p + (–q). Show that the distance between two rational numbers on the number line is the absolute value of their difference, and apply this principle in real-world contexts. d.Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract rational numbers. 7.NS.A.3 Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving the four operations with rational numbers. Prior to the Task Standards Preparation: The material in the chart below illustrates the standards and sample tasks that are pre-requisites for student success with this task’s standards. Grade Level Standards The following standards will prepare them: Items to Check for Task Readiness:Sample Remediation Items : 7.NS.A.1  5.NF.A.1 6.NS.C.5 6.NS.C.6a 6.NS.C.7c 1. a. 2. a. 3.http:/ w.illustrativemathematics.org/7.NS.A.1 1.http://www.illustrativemathematics.org/5.http:/ w.illustrativemathematics.org/5. NF.A.1 2.http://www.illustrativemathematics.org/6.http:/ w.illustrativemathematics.org/6. NS.C.5 3.http://learnzillion.com/lessonsets/411- add-and-subtract-rational- numbers- represent-addition-and-subtraction-on-a- horizontal-or- vertical-number-line-diagramhttp://learnzillion.com/lessonsets/411-add-and-subtract-rational- numbers-represent-addition-and-subtraction-on-a-horizontal-or- vertical-number-line-diagram 4.http://learnzillion.com/lessonsets/596- adding-and-subtracting-rational- numbers- using-distance-absolute-value-and- oppositeshttp://learnzillion.com/lessonsets/596-adding-and-subtracting-rational- numbers-using-distance-absolute-value-and-opposites 7.NS.A.3  4.OA.A.3 6.NS.B.3 1.Your class is considering going on a field trip to a skating ring. The admission fee is $12 per person. You have 25 students in your class. How much will it cost for your class to enter the skating ring? a.$300 2.http://www.illustrativemathematicshttp:/ w.illustrativemathematics.org/7.NS.A.3 1.http://www.illustrativemathematics.org/4.http:/ w.illustrativemathematics.org/4. OA.A.3 2.http://www.illustrativemathematics.org/6.http:/ w.illustrativemathematics.org/6. NS.B.3 3.http://learnzillion.com/lessons/1150-use- addition-and-subtraction-to- solve- realworld-problems-involving-decimalshttp://learnzillion.com/lessons/1150-use-addition-and-subtraction-to- solve-realworld-problems-involving-decimals

17 Mathematics Grade 7 – Instructional Task Real world preparation: The following questions will prepare students for some of the real world components of this task: 1.What is a budget? a.This question is designed to make sure that students understand the purpose of this task. They need to figure out a plan to track how much money is deposited and how much money is spent to ensure that the account always has money. 2.What is an account? a.Some students may be unfamiliar with accounts and using banks. You may need to explain that a bank is where you can bring money. The bank holds the money in an account until you are ready to spend it. 3.What is a balance? a.Students may be unfamiliar with banking terminology. A balance is the amount of money in your account. 4.What is the difference between a withdrawal and a deposit? a.Students may confuse these terms. A deposit is putting money into an account, and a withdrawal is taking money out of an account During the Task: Students may struggle with creating a monthly statement. You can scaffold this task for them using the three months in part one. Have students create monthly statements for September, October, and November. This will help students practice the process of creating a monthly statement before they have to start making decisions about how to make and spend money. During the task, as you circulate around the room look for groups who may only be adding in unrealistic numbers for their fundraisers. For example, students may only add in $25 for a car wash fundraiser. Ask students guiding questions like the following: 1.If you made $25 at your car wash, how many cars did you wash? a.5 cars at $5 each 2.Would you have a car wash if you only were only going to was 5 cars all day? a.Students at this point should discuss a car wash and about how many cars they might expect to wash. After the Task: This task shows students how math is useful in their own lives. Encourage students to think of ways creating a budget might be useful in their own lives. Students may mention creating budgets for clubs or their own personal money.

18 Mathematics Grade 7 – Instructional Task Student Instructional Task Your group has been selected as the officers for your school’s Junior Beta Club. One of your tasks as the executive committee is to track all money deposited into the account as well as all money spent during the year and create a budget for the remainder of the year. At the beginning of September, the balance in the account was $253.24. 1. Below are listed the activities the club spent money on or collected money for: a.Using the table above, create a number line to represent the amount of money added to the account during this three-month period. b.Using the table above, create a number line to represent the amount of money spent during this three-month period. c.How much money is in the account at the end of November? Show two different ways to find the balance of the account. 2. This year the club also voted to include some fun activities throughout the year and an end-of-year trip to celebrate the club’s success. Below is a list of the suggested activities and fundraisers. a.Create a monthly budget for the remainder of the year. In your budget, you will propose which fun activity or activities your club should pursue. You will also propose which fundraisers your club should use to raise the money to finish the year. Keep the following points in mind.  Begin with Dec 1 – Dec 31 and end with May 1 – May 31.  Show the balance at the beginning of each month (use the ending balance from November as the beginning balance for December).  Show any proposed expenses for the month as well as any proposed fundraisers.  Budget $75 per month for supplies for service projects.  The club must also attend the Louisiana Jr. Beta Club Convention in Lafayette, LA in May. The cost of the trip for the convention is $1,500. This includes transportation and hotel rooms.  Include at least one Fun Activity from the list above.  The balance at the end of May should at least $250 to begin the next school year. Your budget should include a month by month statement as well as a short narrative explaining why you chose certain activities and fundraisers. Each monthly statement should show how you calculated the balance at the end each month. Sept 1 – Sept 30Oct 1 – Oct 31Nov 1 – Nov 30Nov 1 – Nov 30 Dues: 25 members at $5 eachGardening materials: $–124.98 Supplies for Thanksgiving baskets: $–40.43 Induction ceremony: $–100.32 Bake sale: $205.50 Fun ActivitiesFundraisers Bowling: $60 per lane (up to 6 people per lane)Candy sale: $60 per member Skating: $12 per personWrapping paper: $50 per member Laser Tag: $15 per personHoliday wreaths: $65 per member Water park: $50 per personCar wash: $5 per car Zoo visit: $12 per student; $17.50 per adultDress down day: $1 per student

19 Mathematics Grade 7 – Instructional Task Instructional Task Exemplar Response Your group has been selected as the officers for your school’s Junior Beta Club. One of your tasks as the executive committee is to track all money deposited into the account as well as all money spent during the year and create a budget for the remainder of the year. At the beginning of September, the balance in the account was $253.24. 1. Below are listed the activities the club spent money on or collected money for: Students may have different number lines for parts a and b as they may not use the beginning balance. The problem asks to show the amount added or spent; students may choose to start at zero. There may also be different methods shown in part c. Sept 1 – Sept 30Oct 1 – Oct 31Nov 1 – Nov 30Nov 1 – Nov 30 Dues: 25 members at $5 eachGardening materials: $–124.98 Supplies for Thanksgiving baskets: $–40.43 Induction ceremony: $–100.32 Bake sale: $205.50

20 Mathematics Grade 7 – Instructional Task 2. This year the club also voted to include some fun activities throughout the year and an end-of-year trip to celebrate the club’s success. Below is a list of the suggested activities and fundraisers. a.Create a monthly budget for the remainder of the year. In your budget, you will propose which fun activity or activities your club should pursue. You will also propose which fundraisers your club should use to raise the money to finish the year. Keep the following points in mind.  Begin with Dec 1 – Dec 31 and end with May 1 – May 31.  Show the balance at the beginning of each month (use the ending balance from November as the beginning balance for December)  Show any proposed expenses for the month as well as any proposed fundraisers.  Budget $75 per month for supplies for service projects.  The club must also attend the Louisiana Jr. Beta Club Convention in Lafayette, LA in May. The cost of the trip for the convention is $1,500. This includes transportation and hotel rooms.  Include at least one Fun Activity from the list above.  The balance at the end of May should at least $250 to begin the next school year. Your budget should include a month by month statement as well as a short narrative explaining why you chose certain activities and fundraisers. Each monthly statement should show how you calculated the balance at the end each month. In your narrative, be sure to explain how you determined which fundraisers to choose, which activity to choose, and when to conduct certain fundraisers. Also, be sure state how much money will be remaining at the end of May. Be prepared to share your budget with the class. This portion of the task will take on many different looks. Students have multiple options to fulfill the requirements listed above. They will need to make some assumptions about the number of chaperones needed for the activities they may wish to propose. They may also need to make some assumptions about the fundraisers, specifically the number of cars they would need to wash and how many students might buy a dress down day pass. Students could research the rules in their school/district and past dress down events to attempt to determine values that make sense with this problem. At minimum, students must include fundraisers to cover $1950 for the service project supplies and convention. Additional fundraisers would be needed to cover the cost of the activity they chose to propose. Fun ActivitiesFundraisers Bowling: $60 per lane (up to 6 people per lane)Candy sale: $60 per member Skating: $12 per personWrapping paper: $50 per member Laser Tag: $15 per personHoliday wreaths: $65 per member Water park: $50 per personCar wash: $5 per car Zoo visit: $12 per student; $17.50 per adultDress down day: $1 per student

21 Math Scaffolding Guides Shows the connections and scaffolding between the math standards Ideal for supporting struggling students

22 Standard Scaffolding The purpose of this document is to show the connections and scaffolding between standards. If a student is struggling with a standard, this document helps a teacher quickly identify the pre-requisite standard needed. This allows a teacher to do discreet remediation to help students practice on-grade level content faster. This is a clear illustration of the coherence found in the math standards. 7th Grade Standard Previous Grade Standards 7th Grade standards taught before (scaffolded) 7th Grade standards taught concurrently 7.RP.A.1 Compute unit rates associated with ratios of fractions, including ratios of lengths, areas and other quantities measured in like or different units. For example, if a person walks 1/2 mile in each 1/4 hour, compute the unit rate as the complex fraction 1/2/1/4 miles per hour, equivalently 2 miles per hour.  6.RPA.2 7.RP.A.2 Recognize and represent proportional relationships between quantities. a.Decide whether two quantities are in a proportional relationship, e.g., by testing for equivalent ratios in a table or graphing on a coordinate plane and observing whether the graph is a straight line through the origin. b.Identify the constant of proportionality (unit rate) in tables, graphs, equations, diagrams, and verbal descriptions of proportional relationships. c.Represent proportional relationships by equations. For example, if total cost t is proportional to the number n of items purchased at a constant price p, the relationship between the total cost and the number of items can be expressed as t = pn. d.Explain what a point (x, y) on the graph of a proportional relationship means in terms of the situation, with special attention to the points (0, 0) and (1, r) where r is the unit rate.  6.RP.A.2 6.RP.A.3  7.RP.A.1  7.EE.B.4a 7.EE.B.4a (Not the fluency portion of the standard)

23 7.RP.A.3 Use proportional relationships to solve multistep ratio and percent problems. Examples: simple interest, tax, markups and markdowns, gratuities and commissions, fees, percent increase and decrease, percent error.  6.RP.A.3  7.RP.A.2 7.NS.A.1a Describe situations in which opposite quantities combine to make 0. For example, a hydrogen atom has 0 charge because its two constituents are oppositely charged.  6.NS.C.5 6.NS.C.6a  7.NS.A.1b 7.NS.A.1b Understand p + q as the number located a distance |q| from p, in the positive or negative direction depending on whether q is positive or negative. Show that a number and its opposite have a sum of 0 (are additive inverses). Interpret sums of rational numbers by describing real-world contexts.  6.NS.C.6a 6.NS.C.7c  7.NS.A.1a 7.NS.A.1c Understand subtraction of rational numbers as adding the additive inverse, p – q = p + (–q). Show that the distance between two rational numbers on the number line is the absolute value of their difference, and apply this principle in real-world contexts.  6.NS.C.7c  7.NS.A.1b 7.NS.A.1d Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract rational numbers.  5.NF.A.1  7.NS.A.1b 7.NS.A.1c 7.NS.A.2a Understand that multiplication is extended from fractions to rational numbers by requiring that operations continue to satisfy the properties of operations, particularly the distributive property, leading to products such as (–1)(–1) = 1 and the rules for multiplying signed numbers. Interpret products of rational numbers by describing real-world contexts.  7.NS.A.1d  7.NS.A.2b 7.NS.A.2c 7.NS.A.2b Understand that integers can be divided, provided that the divisor is not zero, and every quotient of integers (with non-zero divisor) is a  7.NS.A.2a 7.NS.A.2c

24 DateResources March Grades 6-8 ELA and math guidebooks List of K-12 ELA texts included in the ELA unit plans (for purchasing) April High school ELA and math guidebooks May Grades 3-5 ELA and math guidebooks ELA interactive framework PARCC assessment guides, sample items, and additional resources SLT guidance (including new 2014-15 samples) LEAP, iLEAP, End-of-Course exams, ACT, EXPLORE, & PLAN results (late May)ACT,EXPLOREPLAN June Grades K-2 ELA and math guidebooks Teacher Leader Institute in New Orleans LDOE Release Calendar

25 We work together to improve student learning. We believe quality education in Louisiana depends on us. Louisiana Believes. 25 We are Louisiana Teacher Leaders

26 English language arts framework, guidebooks, and unit plans English language arts framework Math guidebooks, tasks, and scaffolding guides Louisiana Believes. 26 How are we using these resources?

27 Locate and review the released resources in the Teacher Toolbox Develop and carry out your plan for becoming familiar with the resources in preparation for 2014-2015 Louisiana Believes. 27 Next Steps

28


Download ppt "Connect with us and ask questions during this presentation: Via at Via Twitter #TeacherLeaders."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google