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Agricultural Value Chains: A Virtuous Cycle Dave Evans, US President Food for the Hungry IFADC – 09 May 2012.

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Presentation on theme: "Agricultural Value Chains: A Virtuous Cycle Dave Evans, US President Food for the Hungry IFADC – 09 May 2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 Agricultural Value Chains: A Virtuous Cycle Dave Evans, US President Food for the Hungry IFADC – 09 May 2012

2 2,580,272 CHILDREN TREATED FOR INTESTIANAL WORMS These children can now absorb essential nutrients from food. Direct and indirect beneficiaries 275,689 BENEFITED FROM CLEAN WATER These people have clean water for better health and farming. 725,118 GAINED BETTER ACCESS TO ADEQUATE FOOD Children and parents are able to access stable food supplies.

3 94,210 CHILDREN AND YOUTH RECEIVED AND EDUCATION Children are developing skills to overcome poverty. 325,929 BENEFITED FROM CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS Latrines, irrigation, roads and wells are all helping communities prosper. 139,367 TRAINED IN HIV/AIDS CARE AND PREVENTION People living with HIV/AIDs found support groups to stay healthy.

4 Value Chains – A Small Part of a Much Larger Picture: Non-emergency food aid is critical for multi- year food security programming, which in turn is critical for developing agricultural value chains, which in turn leads to economic growth, asset accumulation, and increased food security, which in turn creates sustainable growth and resiliency, which ultimately reduces the need for emergency food aid.

5 Food for the Hungry Agricultural Value Chain Programming Bolivia: – USAID Title II and Title III – 1994 to 2008 – USDA Food for Progress – 2007 to present Ethiopia: – USAID Title II – 2004 to present DR Congo: – USAID Title II – 2008 to present Mozambique: – USAID Title II and DA – 1998 to present Kenya: – OFDA (2008 Food Price Crisis Funding) to present

6 A Bolivian Story – Mariano Choque

7 Create and Strengthen Producer Associations: Onions, Corn, Amaranth, Yogurt, Cheese, Butter, Red Pepper

8 Key FH Bolivia FFP Program Results Production Sold through contracts with Producer Associations: 1,863 Metric Tons Participant Annual Household Income: – Baseline = $868 Final = $2,847 (227% increase) Women Participants in Producer Associations: – Baseline = $11% Final = 72% Amount of Final Product Sold in Export Markets: – Baseline = 0% Final = 40%

9 New Market with Sustainable Food Security Impact on Children Title II final evaluation: reduction in chronic malnutrition among under 5s from 59% to 15% (2002 to 2008) 109 Metric Tons sold to Local Schools for School Breakfast Program Value of School Sales = $169, Municipalities Participating Connection to PCI’s FFE program

10 Annual Amount of Leveraged Funds (1 to 0.7)

11 Driving Change for an Entire Province The dairy and corn api value chains introduced in the Tomoyo region have become the center of development of the whole province of Ravelo. A number of neighboring municipalities have asked for assistance in replicating the program in their regions

12 Other Countries Mozambique Title II Value Chain Sales: – Baseline (2009) = $ = $128,618 Mozambique Village S&L Associations: – Baseline = = 149 (with 2,786 members) Amount Saved in Mozambique S&Ls: – Baseline = 0% 2011 = $198,404 Ethiopia Title II Value of Assets per Household: – Baseline (2009) = 3,248 Birr 2011 = 4,118 Birr (26% increase)

13 Value Chains – A Small Part of a Much Larger Picture: Non-emergency food aid is critical for multi- year food security programming, which in turn is critical for developing agricultural value chains, which in turn leads to economic growth, asset accumulation, and increased food security, which in turn creates sustainable growth and resiliency, which ultimately reduces the need for emergency food aid.


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