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Going the Distance: Sports Nutrition for Cyclists Ashley Acornley, MS, RD, LDN Triangle Nutrition Therapy.

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Presentation on theme: "Going the Distance: Sports Nutrition for Cyclists Ashley Acornley, MS, RD, LDN Triangle Nutrition Therapy."— Presentation transcript:

1 Going the Distance: Sports Nutrition for Cyclists Ashley Acornley, MS, RD, LDN Triangle Nutrition Therapy

2 Who We Are Triangle Nutrition Therapy is a private practice specializing in sports nutrition and fitness, along with a variety of weight management and Medical Nutrition Therapy needs. Registered Dietitian AFAA Certified Personal Trainer Rodan and Fields Skincare Consultant In network with BCBS NC and Cigna insurance

3 Goals How to fuel before, during and after cycling events Important nutrition and hydration tips to consider The science is behind the sports nutrition, but the art is figuring out what works best for you!

4 Questions for You… What are your favorite beverages, snacks, or sports supplements you consume while cycling? How much fluid do you consume throughout the day? Do you know how many calories your body needs? Do you know how many grams of carbs and protein you need daily? Do you change your diet during the off-season?

5 Daily Intake Carbs= main source of energy! Stored as glycogen in liver and muscle, but deplete after minutes of endurance activity Daily macro needs for an athlete: 60% CHO, 20-25% Pro, 15-20% Fat 7-12 g/kg CHO daily 5-6 small meals per day Hydration- drink ½ body weight in oz urine should appear pale yellow

6 Planning for your race day Trial and error- find what works best for you over time Don’t try anything new on race day! Biking doesn’t involve much GI jostling, most likely able to tolerate foods better “Taste fatigue” can occur after biking a long distance- plan ahead to reduce eating the same items Nutrients of Importance: Carbs (energy storage) Protein (muscle repair) Antioxidants (immunity and soreness) Fluids (hydration and electrolytes) Sodium (cramping)

7 Fuel Before Exercise: 4 hour window of opportunity to fuel before race Goal is to “top off glycogen stores” 1-4g/kg Carbs (typically g Carbs) 3 hours= 150g 1 cup oatmeal with 2 Tbsp honey, 6 oz yogurt, large banana, 2 Tbsp raisins, 4 ounces OJ 4 oz bagel, 2 Tbsp. PB, 3 Tbsp. jam, 12 ounces apple juice hours= 50-75g 24 ounces sport drink and 1 Gu ½ cup cereal with 1 cup lowfat milk and 1 sliced banana 30 min- 1 hour= 20-30g Gu, sport beans, energy bar, sports drink

8 Fluid Before Exercise 2 hours: ounces water minutes: 7-10 ounces sports drink

9 Fuel During Exercise: 30-60g Carb per hour of training ( kcal) Individual intakes should be adapted to athletes circumstances Can split into smaller increments Can consume liquid, solid, sports supplements

10 Examples of Cycling-Friendly Snacks Applesauce pouches Rice cakes PB/Jelly Baked potato Dried fruit Pretzels/Crackers/Graham Crackers/Fig Newtons Bananas Pop-tarts Energy bars Supplements: sports drinks, sport beans, Gu, Shot Bloks

11 Fluids During Exercise 7-10 ounces of fluid every 20 minutes Include sodium at this time (500-1,500 mg/hour) What do you really need in your sports drink? Source : mix of sucrose, glucose and fructose Carbohydrate: At least 14 grams in every 8 oz for rapid delivery of energy Calories: At least calories per 8 oz Sodium: At least 100 mg per 8 oz to encourage drinking to restore fluid balance Potassium: At least 28 mg per 8 oz to restore body losses

12 Fuel After Exercise (Recovery): “Window of Opportunity” is within 60 minutes after workout 3:1 or 4:1 Carb to Protein ratio recommended 10g-20g protein g Carb Simple sugars work best 2 hours post workout= well balanced meal Increase immunity, decrease inflammation, replenish glycogen, repair muscles

13 Recovery snacks and beverages 8 oz Low-fat chocolate milk (158 kcal, 26g CHO, 8g Pro) Tru Moo or Horizon Organic 2 scoops Hammer Recoverite (170 kcal, 32g CHO, 10g Pro) 8 oz CheriBundi Protein (160 kcal, 30g CHO, 8g Pro) reGen (200 kcal, 35g CHO, 11g Pro) Greek yogurt + fruit smoothie Banana with PB and 8 oz milk Trail mix- almonds, walnuts, dried cherries Salmon with asparagus, sweet potato, and wheat roll Chicken with broccoli, pasta with olive oil and side salad

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15 Fluid After Exercise: ounces for every POUND of body weight lost during the race Sweat rate- varies L fluid (32-48 oz)/ hour 500-1,500mg Na/hour

16 What about endurance/sports supplements? Real, whole foods trump supplements and packaged products any day! Sports products can be used for convenience and GI tolerance

17 What About Alcohol? Diuretic- puts athletes at risk for dehydration, heat illness, and muscle cramping Suppresses fat use as a fuel during exercise Interferes with post-exercise recovery by delaying carbohydrate repletion and muscle repair Increases the risk for nutrient deficiencies by decreasing vitamin and mineral absorption Adds calories and acts as an appetite stimulant which can result in increased calories consumed Can interfere with sleep patterns by reducing time spent in deep, restful sleep

18 Off-Season Nutrition Lifestyle goes into hibernation Decrease calories and carbs if exercise duration/intensity decreases 3 steps: Assess goals- weight loss, cross training? Create small changes- drink more H2O, add more veggies to lunch? Focus on real food- switch from granola bar to fruit and boiled egg for snack?

19 When to see a Sports RD? Sports RDs can help athletes determine calorie, macronutrient, and fluid needs Determine what foods/fluids are tolerated best and match them to your numbers Test, practice, trial and error! Problem solve: Weight maintenance, gain, or loss Increase performance Combat fatigue, soreness, overtraining Increase energy Improve body composition

20 Questions? “Like” Triangle Nutrition Therapy on Facebook! Twitter: Ashley_SportsRD Skincare:

21 Thank You!


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