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Chapter - 11 CWNA Certified Wireless Network Administrator Introduction to Wireless LANs.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter - 11 CWNA Certified Wireless Network Administrator Introduction to Wireless LANs."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter - 11 CWNA Certified Wireless Network Administrator Introduction to Wireless LANs

2 2 The Wireless LAN Market Wireless local area network (WLAN) market. Expected to reach US$4.6 billion by WLAN product shipments should increase by over US$600 million per year from 2001 to The b products have been especially successful in penetrating the education, hospitality, healthcare and financial environments.

3 3 History of Wireless LANs 1830: Professor Joseph Henry transmitted the first practical electrical signal. 1969: The Advanced Research Projects Agency Network (ARPANET) of the U.S. DoD was the world's first operational packet Switched network.

4 4 History of Wireless LANs 1970: ALOHAnet was developed at the University of Hawaii. First wireless packet-switched network. First network to connect to the ARPANET in Star topology using 9600 Baud modems. Shared signal system using carrier sense multiple access. The ALOHAnet used two 100 kHz "channels" at MHz and MHz.

5 5 History of Wireless LANs 1985: Federal Communication Commission (FCC). Authorized license- free spread spectrum wireless equipment in three ISM bands. 900 MHz band, (900 to 928 MHz range) 2.4 GHz band, (2.4 to GHz range) 5 GHz band, (5.725 to GHz range)

6 6 History of Wireless LANs 1997: Federal Communication Commission (FCC). Authorized license- free spread spectrum wireless equipment in three U-NII bands to 5.25 GHz 5.25 to 5.35 GHz to GHz

7 7 Today’s Wireless LAN Standards 1865: The International Telecommunication Union. Radiocommunication (ITU-R) Telecommunication Standardization (ITU-T) Telecommunication Development (ITU-D)

8 8 Today’s Wireless LAN Standards 1934: The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is an independent United States government agency. FCC is charged with regulating interstate and international communications by radio, television, wire, satellite and cable.

9 9 Today’s Wireless LAN Standards Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc., IEEE, (Eye-triple-E). IEEE is non-profit, technical professional association of more than 380,000 individual members in 150 countries. IEEE has nearly 900 active standards with 700 under development.

10 10 Today’s Wireless LAN Standards 1999: The Wi-Fi Alliance is a nonprofit international association formed to certify interoperability of wireless Local Area Network products based on IEEE specification. 210 member companies from around the world 865 products have received Wi-Fi® certification. The goal of the Wi-Fi Alliance's members is to enhance the user experience through product interoperability.

11 11 Today’s Wireless LAN Standards 1997: IEEE Original wireless LAN standard Up to 2Mbps in the 2.4GHz band Modulation: FHSS or DSSS Security: WEP & WPA Compatible with b and g

12 12 Today’s Wireless LAN Standards 1999: IEEE b Up to 11Mbps in the 2.4GHz band Modulation: DSSS with CCK Security: WEP & WPA “Wi-Fi Certified” Compatible with and g

13 13 Today’s Wireless LAN Standards 1999: IEEE a Up to 54Mbps in the 5GHz band Modulation: OFDM Security: WEP & WPA “Wi-Fi Certified” Not Compatible with , b and g

14 14 Today’s Wireless LAN Standards 2003: IEEE g Up to 54Mbps in the 2.4GHz band Modulation: OFDM above 20Mbps, DSSS with CCK below 20Mbps Security: WEP & WPA “Wi-Fi Certified” Compatible with and b

15 15 Today’s Wireless LAN Standards 1998: Bluetooth Up to 2Mbps in the 2.45GHz Modulation: FHSS Security: PPTP, SSL or VPN The Infrared Data Association, IrDA, is a nonprofit organization whose goal is to develop globally adopted specifications for infrared wireless communication.

16 16 Three-Tier Network Design Model A hierarchical network design model described by Cisco Systems, Inc. Core Layer Distribution Layer Access Layer

17 17 Access Layer Access Layer: The layer in which users connect to the rest of the network. The access layer usually includes a relatively large number of low- to medium-speed access ports. This is the layer where many wireless devices and protocols reside. Access Layer

18 18 Access Role Access Point Network Server Network Printer Clients Wired Network Wireless Network Admin Host

19 19 Distribution Layer The Distribution Layer distributes network traffic between related access layers, it is often the layer in which you define subnets. For wireless… think bridging. Distribution Layer

20 20 Distribution Role Point-to-Point Links Transmission Path Building #1 Building #2 Antenna #1 Antenna #2

21 21 Core Layer The Core Layer facilitates the efficient transfer of data between interconnected distribution layers. The core layer typically functions as the high-speed backbone of the enterprise network. Core Layer

22 22 Core Role Access Point Network Server Network Printer Clients Network Core Wireless Network Admin Host Poor Speed and Resiliency

23 23 Network Extension Access Point First Floor Second Floor Third Floor

24 24 Last Mile Data Delivery WISP Antenna Residential Homes Shopping Mall Hot Spot WISP Antenna

25 25 MobilityMobility Access Point Network Server Sales Office Wired Network Warehouse Roaming

26 26 Small Office – Home Office Wall or Divider Laptop Access Point Workstation Internet Connection

27 27 Mobile Office Campus Main Building Portables Point-to-Multipoint Links

28 28 SummarySummary Wireless Networking History Advances in Wireless Networking Reduced costs and increased availability FCC, IEEE, WI-FI Alliance IEEE – , a, b, g Wireless Networking: Core, Distribution and Access Layers WISP


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