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Release 1.0 - September 2006 1 Who Makes the Rules? The rules governing amateur radio under U.S. control are made by an agency of the U.S. government,

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Presentation on theme: "Release 1.0 - September 2006 1 Who Makes the Rules? The rules governing amateur radio under U.S. control are made by an agency of the U.S. government,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Release September Who Makes the Rules? The rules governing amateur radio under U.S. control are made by an agency of the U.S. government, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). These rules are published in what we hams usually call “Part 97.” It would be a really good idea to download a copy of Part 97 to refer to as you study. You can get a copy in several different formats from: regulations/news/part97/

2 Release September What is an Amateur Radio Operator? The FCC says an amateur operator is a person named in an amateur operator/ primary license grant in the FCC ULS database. (See § 97.3(a)(1)) Before a person can become an amateur operator, the person must get a license from the FCC. In order to get that license, the person must take a test such as the Technician exam you are studying for right now.

3 Release September What is an Amateur Radio Station? According to the FCC, an amateur radio station is a station in an Amateur Radio Service consisting of the apparatus necessary for carrying on radio communications. To be an amateur radio station, the station has to be licensed by the FCC and capable of actually communicating. (See §97.3(a)(5))

4 Release September The Purposes of Amateur Radio You may think that the purpose of amateur radio is to have fun. Well, you can certainly have a lot of fun with amateur radio, but according to the FCC, that is not one of the purposes of amateur radio. Part 97 lists five purposes of amateur radio. They are:

5 Release September The Purposes of Amateur Radio “Recognition and enhancement of the value of the amateur service to the public as a voluntary noncommercial communication service, particularly with respect to providing emergency communications.” Hams provide communications during emergencies and at many public events. Hams provide this service at no charge.

6 Release September The Purposes of Amateur Radio “Continuation and extension of the amateur's proven ability to contribute to the advancement of the radio art.” Hams are often the first to come up with new ideas for improving radio communications.

7 Release September The Purposes of Amateur Radio “Encouragement and improvement of the amateur service through rules which provide for advancing skills in both the communications and technical phases of the art.” Hams learn the technical side of radio in order to improve their own skills.

8 Release September The Purposes of Amateur Radio “Expansion of the existing reservoir within the amateur radio service of trained operators, technicians, and electronics experts.” Hams provide a pool of trained radio operators that can be called on during emergencies.

9 Release September The Purposes of Amateur Radio “Continuation and extension of the amateur's unique ability to enhance international goodwill.” Hams spread goodwill as they communicate with other hams all over the world.

10 Release September Amateur Radio License Classes There are three different classes of amateur license that may be earned today. They are: - Technician – This is the entry level license, and the one you are working on right now. - General – The next level license. It requires that you pass a slightly harder test, and that you learn Morse Code, but it is the ticket to most long distance radio contacts. - Extra – This is the toughest license to earn, but it gives you access to all amateur radio frequencies and modes.

11 Release September Amateur Radio License Classes (Note: There are two other license classes that are no longer being issued – Novice and Advanced. You don’t need to know these for the test, but you may hear them mentioned on the air.)

12 Release September How Do You Get an Amateur License? A volunteer examiner (VE) is an amateur accredited by one or more Volunteer Examiner Coordinators (VECs) and who volunteers to administer amateur license exams. (See § (b)) To get your first amateur license, you will have to take a Technician test before a team of at least three volunteer examiners at a scheduled VE session.

13 Release September What Happens When You Pass the Test? When you visit a volunteer examination session, you can take any of four different tests. These tests are called “elements.” Element 1 is a Morse code test, Element 2 is the Technician test, Element 3 is the General Test, and Element 4 is the Extra test. When you pass one or more elements, you are given a “Certificate of Successful Completion of Examination” (CSCE). If it qualifies you for a license, it is your proof that you passed if paperwork should be lost.

14 Release September What Happens When You Pass the Test? But let’s say you go to a VE session and pass your Technician exam. That qualifies you for the Technician license. While you are there, you try the General exam, and you manage to pass it. You don’t qualify for the General license until you pass the Morse code test. However, your CSCE is good for proof that you passed the General for exactly 365 days. If you pass the code test at any VE session and present that CSCE within 365 days you will be upgraded to General. But remember, the CSCE is good for no more than 365 days! (See §97.505(a)(6))

15 Release September Your Volunteer Examiners The FCC says that there must be three volunteer examiners present to administer the Technician exam, and they all must be General class licensees or higher. (See §97.509(a)(b)(3)(i))

16 Release September Harmful Interference When two stations transmit on the same frequency, somebody is not going to be heard. Whether it is intentional or not, the FCC says any transmission that disturbs other communications is “harmful interference.” You should always avoid causing harmful interference.

17 Release 1.0 – September Check-Up Time! Now let’s try the questions from this group. You should make a note of any that you miss for later review.

18 Release September T1A01 Who is an amateur operator as defined in Part 97? A. A person named in an amateur operator/primary license grant in the FCC ULS database B. A person who has passed a written license examination C. The person named on the FCC Form 605 Application D. A person holding a Restricted Operating Permit

19 Release September T1A01 Answer - A §97.3(a)(1) Amateur operator. A person named in an amateur operator/ /primary license station grant on the ULS consolidated licensee database to be the control operator of an amateur station.

20 Release September T1A02 (B) What is one of the basic purposes of the Amateur Radio Service as defined in Part 97? A. To support teaching of amateur radio classes in schools B. To provide a voluntary noncommercial communications service to the public, particularly in times of emergency C. To provide free message service to the public D. To allow the public to communicate with other radio services

21 Release September T1A02 Answer - B §97.1(a) (a) Recognition and enhancement of the value of the amateur service to the public as a voluntary noncommercial communication service, particularly with respect to providing emergency communications.

22 Release September T1A03 What classes of US amateur radio licenses may currently be earned by examination? A. Novice, Technician, General, Advanced B. Technician, General, Advanced C. Technician, General, Extra D. Technician, Tech Plus, General

23 Release September T1A03 Answer - C § Each applicant must pass an examination for a new amateur operator license grant and for each change in operator class. Each applicant for the class of operator license grant specified below must pass, or otherwise receive examination credit for, the following examination elements: (a) Amateur Extra Class operator: Elements 1, 2, 3, and 4; (b) General Class operator: Elements 1, 2, and 3; (c) Technician Class operator: Element 2.

24 Release September T1A04 Who is a Volunteer Examiner? A. A certified instructor who volunteers to examine amateur teaching manuals B. An FCC employee who accredits volunteers to administer amateur license exams C. An amateur accredited by one or more VECs who volunteers to administer amateur license exams D. Any person who volunteers to examine amateur station equipment

25 Release September T1A04 Answer - C § (b) (b) Each administering VE must: Be accredited by the coordinating VEC; (2) Be at least 18 years of age; (3) Be a person who holds an amateur operator license of the class specified... NOTE: VE stands for “volunteer examiner.”

26 Release September T1A05 How long is a CSCE valid for license upgrade purposes? A. 365 days B. Until the current license expires C. Indefinitely D. Until two years following the expiration of the current license

27 Release September T1A05 Answer - A §97.505(a)(6) (a)The administering VEs must give credit as specified below to an examinee holding any of the following license grants or license documents: *** (6) A CSCE: Each element the CSCE indicates the examinee passed within the previous 365 days. NOTE: CSCE stands for “Certificate of Successful Completion of Examination.”

28 Release September T1A06 How many and what class of Volunteer Examiners are required to administer an Element 2 Technician written exam? A. Three Examiners holding any class of license B. Two Examiners holding any class of license C. Three Examiners holding a Technician Class license D. Three Examiners holding a General Class license or higher

29 Release September T1A06 Answer - D §97.509(a)(b)(3)(i) (b) Each administering VE must: *** (3) Be a person who holds an amateur operator license of the class specified below: (i) Amateur Extra, Advanced or General Class in order to administer a Technician Class operator license examination;

30 Release September T1A07 Who makes and enforces the rules for the Amateur Radio Service in the United States? A. The Congress of the United States B. The Federal Communications Commission C. The Volunteer Examiner Coordinators D. The Federal Bureau of Investigation

31 Release September T1A07 Answer - B §97.5 The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has been empowered by Congress to produce regulations for the Amateur Radio Service. These rules are a part of the Federal Code of Regulations, and are commonly referred to as “Part 97” by U.S. hams.

32 Release September T1A08 What are two of the five fundamental purposes for the Amateur Radio Service? A. To protect historical radio data, and help the public understand radio history B. To aid foreign countries in improving radio communications and encourage visits from foreign hams C. To modernize radio electronic design theory and improve schematic drawings D. To increase the number of trained radio operators and electronics experts, and improve international goodwill

33 Release September T1A08 Answer - D §97-1 The rules and regulations in this Part are designed to provide an amateur radio service having a fundamental purpose as expressed in the following principles: (a) Recognition and enhancement of the value of the amateur service to the public as a voluntary noncommercial communication service, particularly with respect to providing emergency communications. (b) Continuation and extension of the amateur's proven ability to contribute to the advancement of the radio art. (c) Encouragement and improvement of the amateur service through rules which provide for advancing skills in both the communications and technical phases of the art. (d) Expansion of the existing reservoir within the amateur radio service of trained operators, technicians, and electronics experts. (e) Continuation and extension of the amateur's unique ability to enhance international goodwill.

34 Release September T1A09 What is the definition of an amateur radio station? A. A station in a public radio service used for radio communications B. A station using radio communications for a commercial purpose C. A station using equipment for training new broadcast operators and technicians D. A station in an Amateur Radio Service consisting of the apparatus necessary for carrying on radio communications

35 Release September T1A09 Answer - D §97.3(a)(5) Amateur station. A station in an amateur radio service consisting of the apparatus necessary for carrying on radiocommunications.

36 Release September T1A10 What is a transmission called that disturbs other communications? A. Interrupted CW B. Harmful interference C. Transponder signals D. Unidentified transmissions

37 Release September T1A10 Answer - B §97.3(A)(23) Harmful interference. Interference which endangers the functioning of a radionavigation service or of other safety services or seriously degrades, obstructs or repeatedly interrupts a radiocommunication service operating in accordance with the Radio Regulations.

38 Release 1.0 – September Group T1B Group T1B covers the International Telecomunications Union (ITU) regions, international amateur regulations, the US amateur call sign structure, special event calls, and the “vanity” call sign program.

39 Release September International Telecommunication Union (ITU) The FCC makes the rules for amateur radio for the U.S., but because radio waves cross borders, nations have cooperated with each other where radio is concerned. That’s where the “International Telecommunications Union” (ITU) comes in. Among other things, the ITU coordinates international rules for amateur radio. (See §97.3(a)(28))

40 Release September ITU Regions The world is divided into three ITU Regions. This helps ITU planners and nations to manage frequency allocations, such as TV channels, AM, FM and shortwave frequencies, and (of course) the all important ham bands!

41 Release September The United States is in Region 2

42 Release September Your Call Sign Soon after you pass your Technician test, you will get your brand new license in the mail. It will feature a brand new call sign that will become your identity on the air. There are a couple of things you’ll want to know about it.

43 Release September Your Call Sign First, your call will start with one of four letters - A, K, N or W. Second, the United States is divided into ten call areas. Your call sign will contain a single number, 0 through 9, representing the call area where you live when your license is issued.

44 Release September Your Call Sign As a Technician licensee, your license will be a “two by three call” – two letters, followed by the call area number, followed by three more letters. Here are some examples of 2 by 3 call signs KA4PUV WB4IUY WA4SIS KI4OTM

45 Release September So What Will Your Call Sign Be? The FCC has a sequential list of call signs. You’ll get the first available call on the list. Call signs are assigned in sequential order. (See §97.17(d))

46 Release September What If You Don’t Like Your Call Sign ? If you don’t like the call sign you get, for a fee, the FCC will let you pick your own call sign from a list of available calls. For example, suppose Elmer H. Fudd would like to have a call sign with his initials, and he finds out that WA9EHF is available. Through a program called the “vanity call sign program” he can apply for that call. (See §97.19(d))

47 Release September Club Station Calls An amateur radio club can also get a call sign for club use, and it is easy to do. To get a club station call sign, a trustee has to submit an application for the club call through a Club Station Call Sign Administrator.

48 Release September Special Event Calls If you are organizing a special radio event, such as a special event station for a July 4th celebration, you can apply for a temporary “one by one” call. The one by one call consists of one of the four U.S. call sign beginning letters (A,K,N or W), a call area number 1 through Ø, and a third letter. Examples are N4J, K3X, A9Z, W2T, and WØW. Any licensed amateur may apply for a temporary call.

49 Release September Reciprocal Operating Agreements Your amateur license allows you to operate anywhere in the U.S. or its possessions. In addition, if the U.S. has a reciprocal operating agreement with a foreign country, you can operate in that country and hams licensed in that country can operate here. The rules that allow this kind of operation vary from country to country, so you need to see whether the U.S. has a reciprocal operating agreement with any country you wish to visit, and what the requirements are. (See §97.107)

50 Release 1.0 – September Check-Up Time! Now let’s try the questions from this group. You should make a note of any that you miss for later review.

51 Release September T1B01 What is the ITU? A. The International Telecommunications Utility B. The International Telephone Union C. The International Telecommunication Union D. The International Technology Union

52 Release September T1B01 Answer - C §97.3(a)(28) ITU. International Telecommunication Union.

53 Release September T1B02 What is the purpose of ITU Regions? A. They are used to assist in the management of frequency allocations B. They are useful when operating maritime mobile C. They are used in call sign assignments D. They must be used after your call sign to indicate your location

54 Release September T1B02 Answer - A § Most of the world’s nations participate in the International Telecommunications Union. This organization sets up regional frequency assignments to prevent harmful radio interference across national borders. Each participating nation then assigns frequencies to its users within that framework. In the U.S., Congress has tasked the FCC with this responsibility.

55 Release September T1B03 What system does the FCC use to select new amateur radio call signs? A. Call signs are assigned in random order B. The applicant is allowed to pick a call sign C. Call signs are assigned in sequential order D. Volunteer Examiners choose an unassigned call sign

56 Release September T1B03 Answer - C §97.17(d) One unique call sign will be shown on the license grant of each new primary, club and military recreation station. The call sign will be selected by the sequential call sign system. Be careful not to confuse this with the vanity call program where a person may apply for a specific call sign!

57 Release September T1B04 What FCC call sign program might you use to obtain a call sign containing your initials? A. The vanity call sign program B. The sequential call sign program C. The special event call sign program D. There is no FCC provision for choosing a your call sign

58 Release September T1B04 Answer - A §97.19(d) The vanity call sign requested by an applicant must be selected from the group of call signs corresponding to the same or lower class of operator license held by the applicant as designated in the sequential call sign system. This rule also sets out the specific requirements for applying for the new call.

59 Release September T1B05 How might an amateur radio club obtain a club station call sign? A. By applying directly to the FCC in Gettysburg, PA B. By applying through a Club Station Call Sign Administrator C. By submitting a FCC Form 605 to the FCC in Washington, DC D. By notifying a VE team using NCVEC Form 605

60 Release September T1B05 Answer - B §97.17(b)(2) For a new club or military recreation station license grant, each applicant must present all information required by the rules to an amateur radio organization having tax-exempt status under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 that provides voluntary, uncompensated and unreimbursed services in providing club and military recreation station call signs ("Club Station Call Sign Administrator") who must submit the information to the FCC in an electronic batch file...

61 Release September T1B06 Who is eligible to apply for temporary use of a 1-by-1 format Special Event call sign? A. Only Amateur Extra class amateurs B. Only military stations C. Any FCC-licensed amateur D. Only trustees of amateur radio club stations

62 Release September T1B06 Answer - C Any amateur can apply for a temporary 1-by-1 call for a special event or contest. For example, if TEARA wanted to compete in a one day CW contest as a club, any of its ham members could apply for a call that would be easy to send in code, such as W4T. It’s called a one-by-one call because it has only one letter before the call area number and one after the call area number.

63 Release September T1B07 When are you allowed to operate your amateur station in a foreign country? A. When there is a reciprocal operating agreement between the countries B. When there is a mutual agreement allowing third party communications C. When authorization permits amateur communications in a foreign language D. When you are communicating with non- licensed individuals in another country

64 Release September T1B07 Answer - A § A non-citizen of the United States (“alien”) holding an amateur service authorization granted by the alien's government is authorized to be the control operator of an amateur station located at places where the amateur service is regulated by the FCC, provided there is in effect a multilateral or bilateral reciprocal operating arrangement, to which the United States and the alien's government are parties, for amateur service operation on a reciprocal basis. The FCC will issue public announcements listing the countries with which the United States has such an arrangement.

65 Release September T1B08 Which of the following call signs is a valid US amateur call? A. UZ4FWD B. KBL7766 C. KB3TMJ D. VE3TWJ

66 Release September T1B08 Answer - C A valid amateur call issued to an individual in the U.S. will always begin with either W, K, N, or A. Depending on the license class, it will consist of either one or two letters, followed by a single digit number, which will be followed by one, two or three letters.

67 Release September T1B09 What letters must be used for the first letter in US amateur call signs? A. K, N, U and W B. A, K, N and W C. A, B, C and D D. A, N, V and W

68 Release September T1B09 ANSWER - B A valid amateur call in the U.S. will always begin with either W, K, N, or A.

69 Release September T1B10 What numbers are used in US amateur call signs? A. Any two-digit number, 10 through 99 B. Any two-digit number, 22 through 45 C. A single digit, 1 though 9 D. A single digit, 0 through 9

70 Release September T1B10 Answer - D A single digit, 0 through 9 will always be in the middle of a call sign. This number represents the call area in which the person received that particular license.

71 Release 1.0 – September Group T1C Group T1C covers the authorized frequencies for Technician licenses, and reciprocal licensing between the United States and other countries. It also covers operation near amateur band edges and sharing the spectrum with other services.

72 Release September Control Operator You may have visited a licensed ham and had the privilege of talking on your friend’s radio. As long as your friend is there and in control of the station, that is perfectly legal. Before a person can control an amateur station here in the U.S., the person must be named in the FCC amateur license database, or be an alien with reciprocal operating authorization What does this mean? It means that a person either has to be licensed (that’s how you get in the database), or be an foreign licensed amateur (alien) from a country that has a reciprocal operating agreement with the U.S.

73 Release September So Where Can You Operate? As a Technician licensee licensed by the FCC, you can operate anywhere the Amateur Radio Service is regulated by the FCC. This includes all the states and U.S. possessions. (See §97.5(a))

74 Release September Communication With Other Radio Services Your license is good only for the Amateur Radio Service. The only way you as an amateur operator can legally communicate with other radio services is if the FCC authorizes you to do so. (See §97.111) This usually happens only during a declared emergency, so you can’t generally use your radios to talk with CBers or on the Family Radio Service, even if your equipment is capable of doing so, unless the FCC says it is OK.

75 Release September Radio Bands You are already familiar with radio bands, even if you don’t realize it. For example, the AM broadcast band in the U.S. is from 525 kilohertz to 1715 kilohertz. Suppose your favorite AM station is at 850 on your radio display. That means its frequency is 850 kilohertz.

76 Release September Radio Bands Another example – the FM broadcast band is from 87.9 megahertz to megahertz. If you like to listen to “Oldies 101.5,” you are listening to a station whose frequency is megahertz. (For right now, don’t worry about what “kilohertz” and “megahertz” mean. We’ll get to that later.)

77 Release September Amateur Radio Bands It shouldn’t surprise you that there are amateur radio bands as well. As a Technician there are several you should be familiar with. They are: 6 Meter Band - 50 megahertz to 54 megahertz 2 meter band megahertz to 148 megahertz 1.25 meter band megahertz to 225 megahertz 70 centimeter (cm) band megahertz to 450 megahertz 23 centimeter (cm) band megahertz to 1300 megahertz

78 Release September Amateur Radio Bands There are not all that many things you have to memorize for the Technician exam, but these bands do have to be memorized. You should take a minute or two to write down the bands and their frequencies on the previous slide.

79 Release September Secondary Basis Hams have to share some of their frequencies with other services, such as government radio services, on what is called a “secondary basis” with the other service being the “primary” user. When the FCC says that an amateur frequency band is available on a secondary basis that means is that amateurs may not cause harmful interference to primary users. (See §97.303)

80 Release September Communicating with Foreign Hams Remember that thing about amateurs promoting goodwill? A U.S. amateur operator may communicate with an amateur in a foreign country at any time unless prohibited by either government. (See §97.111)

81 Release September Prohibited Transmissions When you operate your radio, there are a number of things you can legally do such as make brief transmissions to adjust your station, establish two-way communications with other stations, or even assist persons learning or improving proficiency in Morse code (CW). However, you may not engage in communications on a regular basis that could reasonably be furnished alternatively through other radio services. That is a huge no-no! (See §97.113(a)(5))

82 Release 1.0 – September Check-Up Time! Now let’s try the questions from this group. You should make a note of any that you miss for later review.

83 Release September T1C01 What is required before you can control an amateur station in the US? A. You must hold an FCC restricted operator's permit for a licensed radio station B. You must submit an FCC Form 605 with a license examination fee C. You must be named in the FCC amateur license database, or be an alien with reciprocal operating authorization D. The FCC must issue you a Certificate of Successful Completion of Amateur Training

84 Release September T1C01 Answer - C §97.5(a) (a) The station apparatus must be under the physical control of a person named in an amateur station license grant on the ULS consolidated license database or a person authorized for alien reciprocal operation by § of this part, before the station may transmit on any amateur service frequency...

85 Release September T1C02 Where does a US amateur license allow you to transmit? A. From anywhere in the world B. From wherever the Amateur Radio Service is regulated by the FCC or where reciprocal agreements are in place C. From a country that shares a third party agreement with the US D. Only from the mailing address printed on your license

86 Release September T1C02 Answer - B §97.5(a) The answer to this question is not particularly clear from a reading of the rule, but essentially, your license allows you to operate anywhere the FCC has jurisdiction or in any country that has a reciprocal agreement with the U.S.

87 Release September T1C03 Under what conditions are amateur stations allowed to communicate with stations operating in other radio services? A. When other radio services make contact with amateur stations B. When authorized by the FCC C. When communicating with stations in the Family Radio Service D. When commercial broadcast stations are off the air

88 Release September T1C03 Answer - B § Specifically, (a)(2) says, “Transmissions necessary to exchange messages with a station in another FCC-regulated service while providing emergency communications;” Ordinarily, the FCC will only authorize communications with other radio services when there is an emergency of some sort.

89 Release September T1C04 Which frequency is within the 6-meter band? A MHz B MHz C MHz D MHz

90 Release September T1C04 Answer - B §97.301(a) This subsection contains a table of all the amateur band frequency allocations. You will not have to memorize all of them, but you will have to memorize some.

91 Release September T1C05 Which amateur band are you using when transmitting on MHz? A. 2 meter band B. 20 meter band C. 14 meter band D. 6 meter band

92 Release September T1C05 Answer - A §97.301(a) Another frequency question referring to the same table in the rules. You can count on having at least one such question on your exam.

93 Release September T1C06 Which 70-centimeter frequency is authorized to a Technician class license holder operating in ITU Region 2? A MHz B MHz C MHz D MHz

94 Release September T1C06 Answer - C §97.301(a) Yet another frequency question. You may as well become familiar with these bands. As a Technician licensee, they are your bands!

95 Release September T1C07 Which 23 centimeter frequency is authorized to a Technician class license holder operating in ITU Region 2? A MHz B MHz C MHz D MHz

96 Release September T1C07 Answer - B §97.301(a) Here’s another frequency question. Although there are several possible on the test, you will never get more than one.

97 Release September T1C08 What amateur band are you using if you are operating on MHz? A. 15 meter band B. 10 meter band C. 2 meter band D meter band

98 Release September T1C08 Answer - D §97.301(a) The frequency questions represent the bands you need to be familiar with. Again, there is no shortcut for these questions. For complete success, you will have to memorize the allocations. The good news is there are not all that many.

99 Release September T1C09 What do the FCC rules mean when an amateur frequency band is said to be available on a secondary basis? A. Secondary users of a frequency have equal rights to operate B. Amateurs are only allowed to use the frequency at night C. Amateurs may not cause harmful interference to primary users D. Secondary users are not allowed on amateur bands

100 Release September T1C09 Answer - C § A secondary user cannot cause interference to the other service, even if it means the secondary user has to stop transmitting. Also the secondary user has to put up with interference caused by the other service.

101 Release September T1C10 When may a US amateur operator communicate with an amateur in a foreign country? A. Only when a third-party agreement exists between the US and the foreign country B. At any time except between and MHz C. Only when a foreign amateur uses English D. At any time unless prohibited by either government

102 Release September T1C10 Answer - D § The only time you cannot communicate with a foreign ham is when either their government or ours says you cannot. According to the rule, the foreign government will notify the ITU when it wishes to restrict communications, and the FCC publishes notices of such restrictions.

103 Release September T1C11 Which of the following types of communications are not permitted in the Amateur Radio Service? A. Brief transmissions to make adjustments to the station B. Brief transmissions to establish two-way communications with other stations C. Transmissions to assist persons learning or improving proficiency in CW D. Communications on a regular basis that could reasonably be furnished alternatively through other radio services

104 Release September T1C11 Answer - D §97.113(a)(5) This rule has a long list of prohibited communications, but most are common sense. While you will not be tested on most of them, to be a good operator, you should be familiar with all of them.

105 Release 1.0 – September Group T1D Group T1D covers your station license and the importance of having your correct name and address on file with the FCC. It also covers the term of the amateur license, how you renew your license, and the grace period if you let your license expire.

106 Release September Amateur Radio Service Operator License The Amateur Radio Service is unique in that it is the only service regulated by the FCC that is issued an operator station license. Many services are issued a station license, but the amateur license with its unique call sign covers both the operator and any station set up by that operator. (See §97.17(a))

107 Release September Who Can Be An Amateur Radio Operator in the U.S. Anyone except a representative of a foreign government can become an amateur licensee in the U.S or any other area under the FCC’s jurisdiction. You do not have to be a U.S. citizen. (See §97.5(b)(1))

108 Release September How Old Do You Have To Be To Be A Ham? There is no minimum age requirement to get an amateur radio license. If you can pass the required test, you can be licensed at any age.

109 Release September The FCC Grants Amateur Licenses The Federal Communications Commission grants your amateur license once you pass your exam. Never forget – this is the agency that regulates just about everything to do with amateur radio!

110 Release September When Can You Begin Operating? We live in an Internet world. Once you pass the required examination elements for your Technician license, you do not have to wait for your license to arrive in the mail. As soon as your license grant appears in the FCC's ULS database, you can begin operating. (See §97.5(a)) Most CSCEs will have one or more Internet links you can visit to see whether your license has been issued. As soon as you see your name and call sign, you can begin using it.

111 Release September How Long Is Your License Good For? Amateur licenses are issued for a term of ten years. (See §97.25(a))

112 Release September What If You Let Your License Expire? Even if you let your license expire, there is a two year grace period during which you can renew your license without having to retake any exam. (See §97.21(b)) There’s only one catch. You absolutely cannot operate during the grace period. If you let your license expire, and you renew during the two year grace period, you have to wait until you are renewed to resume operating. (See §97.21(b))

113 Release September Your Responsibility As A Station Licensee One thing that you must always remember is that as a station licensee, you are responsible for insuring that your station is operated in accordance with the FCC rules. (See §97.103(a)) You cannot pass the buck on that one!

114 Release September Your Mailing Address The FCC requires that your mailing address as the station licensee to be kept up to date on its Universal Licensing System (ULS) database. They are very picky about that. The Commission intends to insure that you can receive mail delivery from the FCC by the United States Postal Service. If your mail is returned to the FCC as undeliverable, the FCC could revoke or suspend your hard-earned license! You wouldn’t want that to happen, now would you? (See §97.23)

115 Release 1.0 – September Check-Up Time! Now let’s try the questions from this group. You should make a note of any that you miss for later review.

116 Release September T1D01 Which of the following services are issued an operator station license by the FCC? A. Family Radio Service B. Amateur Radio Service C. General Radiotelephone Service D. The Citizens Radio Service

117 Release September T1D01 Answer - B §97.17(a) The amateur radio service is unique in that the license grant licenses both the operator and the station put into service by the operator. Other FCC licenses, when required, usually license either the operator or the station, but not both. A license is not required for FRS or CB.

118 Release September T1D02 Who can become an amateur licensee in the US? A. Anyone except a representative of a foreign government B. Only a citizen of the United States C. Anyone except an employee of the US government D. Anyone

119 Release September T1D02 Answer - A §97.5(b)(1) (b) The types of station license grants are: (1) An operator/primary station license grant. One, but only one, operator/primary station license grant may be held by any one person. The primary station license is granted together with the amateur operator license. Except for a representative of a foreign government, any person who qualifies by examination is eligible to apply for an operator/primary station license grant.

120 Release September T1D03 What is the minimum age required to hold an amateur license? A. 14 years or older B. 18 years or older C. 70 years or younger D. There is no minimum age requirement

121 Release September T1D03 Answer - D §97.5(b)(1) There is no age requirement to get an amateur radio license.

122 Release September T1D04 What government agency grants your amateur radio license? A. The Department of Defense B. The Bureau of Public Communications C. The Department of Commerce D. The Federal Communications Commission

123 Release September T1D04 Answer - D §97.5(a) The thing to remember is that the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) regulates all aspects of amateur radio, from issuing the license to enforcement actions.

124 Release September T1D05 How soon may you transmit after passing the required examination elements for your first amateur radio license? A. Immediately B. 30 days after the test date C. As soon as your license grant appears in the FCC's ULS database D. As soon as you receive your license in the mail from the FCC

125 Release September T1D05 Answer - C §97.5(a) You do not have to wait for your license to show up in the mail. As soon as your license is granted by the FCC and you find your call sign in the FCC’s online database, you can begin operating. The license will usually arrive in the mail a day or two later.

126 Release September T1D06 What is the normal term for an amateur station license grant? A. 5 years B. 7 years C. 10 years D. For the lifetime of the licensee

127 Release September T1D06 Answer - C §97.25(a) An amateur service license is normally granted for a 10-year term. And that’s a long time between renewals!

128 Release September T1D07 What is the grace period during which the FCC will renew an expired 10-year license without re-examination? A. 2 years B. 5 years C. 10 years D. There is no grace period

129 Release September T1D07 Answer - A §97.21(b) (b) A person whose amateur station license grant has expired may apply to the FCC for renewal of the license grant for another term during a 2 year filing grace period. The application must be received at the address specified above prior to the end of the grace period. Unless and until the license grant is renewed, no privileges in this Part are conferred.

130 Release September T1D08 What is your responsibility as a station licensee? A. You must allow another amateur to operate your station upon request B. You must be present whenever the station is operated C. You must notify the FCC if another amateur acts as the control operator D. Your station must be operated in accordance with the FCC rules

131 Release September T1D08 Answer - D §97.103(a) (a) The station licensee is responsible for the proper operation of the station in accordance with the FCC Rules. As an amateur operator, you are always required to follow the FCC’s rules. A does not make much sense. B and C may look correct, but there are practical reasons why neither is a right answer, as you will learn.

132 Release September T1D09 When may the FCC revoke or suspend a license if the mailing address of the holder is not current with the FCC? A. If mail is returned to the FCC as undeliverable B. When the licensee transmits without having updated the address C. When the licensee operates portable at a different address D. If the address is not updated within the 2 year grace period

133 Release September T1D09 Answer - A §97.23 Each license grant must show the grantee's correct name and mailing address. The mailing address must be in an area where the amateur service is regulated by the FCC and where the grantee can receive mail delivery by the United States Postal Service. Revocation of the station license or suspension of the operator license may result when correspondence from the FCC is returned as undeliverable because the grantee failed to provide the correct mailing address.

134 Release September T1D10 The FCC requires which address to be kept up to date on the Universal Licensing System database? A. The station location address B. The station licensee mailing address C. The station location address and mailing address D. The station transmitting location address

135 Release September T1D10 Answer - B §97.23 Each license grant must show the grantee's correct name and mailing address. The mailing address must be in an area where the amateur service is regulated by the FCC and where the grantee can receive mail delivery by the United States Postal Service. Revocation of the station license or suspension of the operator license may result when correspondence from the FCC is returned as undeliverable because the grantee failed to provide the correct mailing address.

136 Release September T1D11 When are you permitted to continue to transmit if you forget to renew your amateur license and it expires? A. Transmitting is not allowed until the license is renewed and appears on the FCC ULS database B. When you identify using the suffix EXP C. When you notify the FCC you intend to renew within 90 days D. Transmitting is allowed any time during the 2-year grace period

137 Release September T1D11 Answer - A §97.21(b) (b) A person whose amateur station license grant has expired may apply to the FCC for renewal of the license grant for another term during a 2 year filing grace period. The application must be received at the address specified above prior to the end of the grace period. Unless and until the license grant is renewed, no privileges in this Part are conferred.

138 Release September T1D12 Why must an Amateur radio operator have a correct name and mailing address on file with the FCC? A. To receive mail delivery from the FCC by the United States Postal Service B. So the FCC Field office can contact the licensee C. It isn't required when you haven't operated your station in a year D. So the FCC can locate your transmitting location

139 Release September T1D12 Answer - A §97.23 Each license grant must show the grantee's correct name and mailing address. The mailing address must be in an area where the amateur service is regulated by the FCC and where the grantee can receive mail delivery by the United States Postal Service. Revocation of the station license or suspension of the operator license may result when correspondence from the FCC is returned as undeliverable because the grantee failed to provide the correct mailing address.

140 Release 1.0 – September One Down, Nine to Go! This concludes Study Guide # 1. Once you are satisfied that you can answer 80% of the questions in this Sub-element, you are ready to move on to Study Guide # 2.


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