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Chapter 21 Section 3 The Great Society was a set of domestic programs proposed or enacted in the United States on the initiative of President Lyndon B.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 21 Section 3 The Great Society was a set of domestic programs proposed or enacted in the United States on the initiative of President Lyndon B."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 21 Section 3 The Great Society was a set of domestic programs proposed or enacted in the United States on the initiative of President Lyndon B. Johnson. The Great Society was a set of domestic programs proposed or enacted in the United States on the initiative of President Lyndon B. Johnson. Two main goals of the Great Society social reforms were the elimination of poverty and of racial injustice. Two main goals of the Great Society social reforms were the elimination of poverty and of racial injustice. New major spending programs that addressed education, medical care, urban problems, and transportation were launched during this period. New major spending programs that addressed education, medical care, urban problems, and transportation were launched during this period. The Great Society in scope and sweep resembled the New Deal domestic agenda of Franklin D. Roosevelt, but differed sharply in types of programs enacted. The Great Society in scope and sweep resembled the New Deal domestic agenda of Franklin D. Roosevelt, but differed sharply in types of programs enacted.

2 Chapter 21 Section 3 Some Great Society proposals were stalled initiatives from John F. Kennedy's New Frontier. Some Great Society proposals were stalled initiatives from John F. Kennedy's New Frontier. Johnson's success depended on his persuasive skills, coupled with the Democratic landslide in the 1964 election that brought in many new liberals to Congress. Johnson's success depended on his persuasive skills, coupled with the Democratic landslide in the 1964 election that brought in many new liberals to Congress. Anti-war Democrats complained that spending on the Vietnam War choked off the Great Society. Anti-war Democrats complained that spending on the Vietnam War choked off the Great Society. While some of the programs have been eliminated or had their funding reduced, many of them, including Medicare, Medicaid, and federal education funding, continue to the present. While some of the programs have been eliminated or had their funding reduced, many of them, including Medicare, Medicaid, and federal education funding, continue to the present. The Great Society's programs expanded under the administrations of Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford. The Great Society's programs expanded under the administrations of Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford.

3 Chapter 21 Section 3 In 1965, President Lyndon Johnson signed a bill that has dramatically changed the method by which immigrants are admitted to America. In 1965, President Lyndon Johnson signed a bill that has dramatically changed the method by which immigrants are admitted to America. This bill is the Immigration Act of This bill is the Immigration Act of This act, also known as the Hart-Cellar Act, not only allows more individuals from third world countries to enter the US (including Asians, who have traditionally been hindered from entering America), but also entails a separate quota for refugees. This act, also known as the Hart-Cellar Act, not only allows more individuals from third world countries to enter the US (including Asians, who have traditionally been hindered from entering America), but also entails a separate quota for refugees.

4 Chapter 21 Section 3 Under the Act, 170,000 immigrants from the Eastern Hemisphere are granted residency, with no more than 20,000 per country. Under the Act, 170,000 immigrants from the Eastern Hemisphere are granted residency, with no more than 20,000 per country. One hundred twenty thousand immigrants from the Western Hemisphere, with no “national limitations,” are also to be admitted. One hundred twenty thousand immigrants from the Western Hemisphere, with no “national limitations,” are also to be admitted. The significance of this bill was that future immigrants were to be welcomed because of their skills/professions, and not for their countries of origin. The significance of this bill was that future immigrants were to be welcomed because of their skills/professions, and not for their countries of origin. Before President Johnson signed this bill, the Senate voted 76 to 18 in favor of this act, with the most opposition votes cast by Southern delegates. The House voted 326 to 69 in favor of the act. Before President Johnson signed this bill, the Senate voted 76 to 18 in favor of this act, with the most opposition votes cast by Southern delegates. The House voted 326 to 69 in favor of the act.

5 Chapter 21 Section 3 The Warren Court ( ) represents a period in the history of the Supreme Court of the United States that was marked by one of the starkest and most dramatic changes in judicial power and philosophy. The Warren Court ( ) represents a period in the history of the Supreme Court of the United States that was marked by one of the starkest and most dramatic changes in judicial power and philosophy. Led by Chief Justice Earl Warren, the Court expanded civil rights, liberties, the judicial power, and the federal governmental power in ways previously unseen. Led by Chief Justice Earl Warren, the Court expanded civil rights, liberties, the judicial power, and the federal governmental power in ways previously unseen. At the same time heralded and criticized for its activism in bringing an end to segregation, incorporating the bill of rights, ending staff-sanctioned, mandatory school prayer, and other controversial decisions, the period is recognized as a high point in judicial power that has receded ever since, but with a substantial continuing impact. At the same time heralded and criticized for its activism in bringing an end to segregation, incorporating the bill of rights, ending staff-sanctioned, mandatory school prayer, and other controversial decisions, the period is recognized as a high point in judicial power that has receded ever since, but with a substantial continuing impact. Members of the Warren Court: Members of the Warren Court: William Brennan, William O.Douglas, Hugo Black, William Brennan, William O.Douglas, Hugo Black, Felix Frankfurter John Marshall Harlan Felix Frankfurter John Marshall Harlan

6 Chapter 21 Section 3 Quiz 1.) What was a set of domestic programs proposed by Lyndon Johnson called? a.) The New Deal b.) The Works Project Plan c.) The Great Society 2.) What was the main goal of these programs? a.) To eliminate poverty and racial injustice b.) To give women equal pay in the work place c.) To fight against the spread of Communism 3.) Name one war in the 1960’s? a.) WWII b.) The Vietnam War c.) The Korean War 4.) Which act allowed more people from the Third World Countries into the United States? a.) The Immigration Act of 1965 b.) The Third World Country Act of 1965 c.) The Chinese Inclusion Act of ) What Court expanded civil liberties the most in the sixties? a.) The racial injustice court b.) The Warren Court c.) The Immigration Court 6.) What war was just before the Vietnam War? a.) The Korean War b.) The Gulf War c.) WWII 7.) Who was the Warren Court named after? a.) Earl Warren b.) Don Warren c.) James Warren 8.) Name one prominent Civil Rights activist in the 1960’s? a.) Booker T. Washington b.) Frederick Douglass c.) Martin Luther King 9.) What was the difference between King and Malcolm X? a.) King believed in non-violent protests while Malcolm X believed in violence b.) King believed in violence while Malcolm X believed in non-violent protests c.) King did not believe in protesting while Malcolm X did 10.) Name the University that won the first NCAA basketball championship with all African Americans playing in the finals? a.) Texas Western, now known as UTEP b.) Texas Western, now known as Texas Tech c.) Texas Western, now known as Texas A&M


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