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Literary Elements Irony Characterization Allusion Paradox Conflict Fact v. Opinion Symbol Point of View Settings Theme Tone Mood Plot.

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Presentation on theme: "Literary Elements Irony Characterization Allusion Paradox Conflict Fact v. Opinion Symbol Point of View Settings Theme Tone Mood Plot."— Presentation transcript:

1 Literary Elements Irony Characterization Allusion Paradox Conflict Fact v. Opinion Symbol Point of View Settings Theme Tone Mood Plot

2 LITERARY ELEMENTS Take good notes!!!

3 Irony Verbal Irony (sarcasm): A writer or speaker says one thing but really means something completely different. A writer or speaker says one thing but really means something completely different. Example: In “The Most Dangerous Game,” General Zaroff, who hunts and kills people for sport, says, “We try to be civilized here.” Example: In “The Most Dangerous Game,” General Zaroff, who hunts and kills people for sport, says, “We try to be civilized here.”

4 “Great.”

5 Irony Situational Irony:  When there is a contradiction between what we expect to happen and what really happens  Example: The police chief’s son becomes a thief.

6 Irony Dramatic Irony:  when the audience or the reader knows something important that a character in the play or story doesn’t know  Example: When, in horror movies, we know that the killer is hiding in the backseat of the car, but the actor does not.

7 Characterization Direct Characterization: the author tells readers directly what a character is like or what a person’s motives are Indirect Characterization: the author shows us the character but allows us to interpret for ourselves what kind of person the character is

8 Direct Characterization  Voldemort is an evil wizard who wants to kill Harry Potter.

9 Indirect Characterization 1. Describe the character’s appearance. A giant of a man was standing in the doorway. His face was almost completely hidden by a long, shaggy mane of hair and a wild, tangled beard, but you could make out his eyes, glinting like black beetles under all the hair.

10 Indirect Characterization 2. Show the character in action—what he does or how he acts. The boy glanced around and then tossed his empty can on the ground.

11 Indirect Characterization 3. Have the character speak… DIALOGUE! “I don’t have to do what you say,” declared little Austin, glaring at his new baby sitter. “What if I brought you two presents, Mrs. Sykes?” Todd said. “By the way, can I have another A???”

12 Indirect Characterization 4. Reveal the character’s private thoughts and feelings. Scottie didn’t like the looks of the carrot pudding, but he hated to hurt his mother’s feelings and resolved to choke it down.

13 Indirect Characterization 5. Show how others react to the character— what they say or think about “Work in a group with those idiots?” said Sean. “No way! I’ll get stuck doing all the work.”

14 Allusion A reference to a statement, person, place, event, or thing that is known from literature, history, religion, myth, politics, sports, science, or the arts. Example: "Christy didn't like to spend money. She was no Scrooge, but she seldom purchased anything except the bare necessities".

15 Paradox A statement or a situation that seems to be a contradiction but actually reveals a truth A statement or a situation that seems to be a contradiction but actually reveals a truth Example: “Parting is such sweet sorrow.” Example: “Parting is such sweet sorrow.” This paradox is true because the parting kisses are sweet, but the leaving itself is sad. This paradox is true because the parting kisses are sweet, but the leaving itself is sad. Method to the madness. Method to the madness.

16 Paradox "War is peace." "Freedom is slavery." "Ignorance is strength." (George Orwell, 1984) "War is peace." "Freedom is slavery." "Ignorance is strength." (George Orwell, 1984)

17 Conflict External Conflict: includes a struggle with an outside source Man vs. Man Man vs. Environment/Soci ety Man vs. Nature Man vs. Machine Man vs. Supernatural

18 Conflict Internal Conflict: Internal Conflict: Takes place in a character’s own mind Example: A problem that the character is dealing with inside Example: A problem that the character is dealing with inside

19 FACT vs. OpINioN  A fact is something that can be proven.  An opinion is a personal belief that can’t be proven, only supported

20 Symbol A person, place, or thing that is itself but also represents something else altogether Example: The scale is itself an instrument for weighing things, but it is also a symbol for justice

21 Point of View ► FIRST PERSON  One of the characters is actually the narrator of the story  Look for “I”

22 Point of View Second Person –Look for the word “you” –Typically used in recipes, instructional manuals, etc.

23 Point of View  Third Person Limited:  The narrator, who plays no part in the story, zooms in on the thoughts and feelings of just one character

24 Point of View Third Person Omniscient (all knowing): - The person telling the story knows everything there is to know about the characters & their problems

25 Setting The time and place of a story The time and place of a story

26 Theme The central idea of a work of literature The central idea of a work of literature Usually a truth about human life Usually a truth about human life Rarely stated directly Rarely stated directly

27 Tone The author’s attitude toward his subject. Tone is conveyed through the author's words and details.

28 Mood Prevailing atmosphere or emotional aura of a work. Setting, tone, & events can affect the mood. Mood is the emotions that you feel while you are reading.

29 *PLOT* A series of related events, each event connected to the next, like links in a chain *It’s what happens between “Once upon a time” and “happily ever after.”

30 Parts of a Plot EXPOSITION: EXPOSITION: gives information about the characters and their problems and conflicts Exposition

31 Parts of a Plot  Rising Action: –Consists of a series of complications. These occur as the main characters take action to solve their problems. Exposition Rising Action

32 Parts of a Plot  Climax:  The most emotional part of the story—when the outcome of the conflict is revealed. Exposition Rising Action Climax

33 Parts of a Plot  FALLING ACTION: Presents events that result from the climax Presents events that result from the climax Exposition Rising Action Climax Falling Action

34 Parts of a Plot Resolution: The end of the story where all struggles are over, and we know what is going to happen to the characters. Exposition Rising Action Climax Falling Action Resolution


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