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Texts and Context MODULE A: Comparative Study of Texts and Context Texts in Time Elective 2: Texts in Time texts composed in different times and contexts.

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Presentation on theme: "Texts and Context MODULE A: Comparative Study of Texts and Context Texts in Time Elective 2: Texts in Time texts composed in different times and contexts."— Presentation transcript:

1 Texts and Context MODULE A: Comparative Study of Texts and Context Texts in Time Elective 2: Texts in Time texts composed in different times and contexts may reflect changing values and perspectives.  In this elective students compare how the treatment of similar content in a pair of texts composed in different times and contexts may reflect changing values and perspectives. texts in their contexts and comparing values, ideas and language forms and features,  By considering the texts in their contexts and comparing values, ideas and language forms and features, students come to a heightened understanding of the meaning and significance of each text.

2 …texts composed in different times and contexts…

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6 More ideas about historical context…

7 The novel Frankenstein (or the Modern Prometheus) by Mary Shelley, and the film Blade Runner – 1982 – directed by Ridley Scott. Texts in time…

8 Compare texts in order to explore them in relation to their contexts. Frankenstein & Blade Runner Social change French Revolution (F) Rural population moves to city and urban areas (F) Consumerism (BR) Women’s roles / rights (BR) High density apartment living Credit cards popular (BR) Historical / economic change 1800s – Industrial revolution (F) 1980s – Computer age (BR) - Climate change issue (BR) - Super-companies dominate world market Cultural change Religious dogma challenged by science (F) Romanticism (F) replaces Neo- classical thought/literature Traditional organised religion loses more people over science (BR) Family structure changes – less children / decrease in extended families (BR) Increased immigration and travel blends many cultures in western countries (BR)

9 Universal beliefs and ideas Individuals conformed to social expectations Manicured and “show” gardens Positioned the responder to feel peaceful and tranquil The “natural” world was dangerous and evil Universal beliefs and ideas Individuals conformed to social expectations Manicured and “show” gardens Positioned the responder to feel peaceful and tranquil The “natural” world was dangerous and evil  Individual beliefs and ideas Individuals challenged the social expectations and were beyond control Un-manicured gardens – mountains / oceans / forests Positioned the responder to be inspired The “natural” world was sublime  Individual beliefs and ideas Individuals challenged the social expectations and were beyond control Un-manicured gardens – mountains / oceans / forests Positioned the responder to be inspired The “natural” world was sublime BEFORE…? NEO-CLASSIC LITERATURE ROMANTICISM…

10 Frankenstein: a brief chronology of events related to context…

11 1940s The computer age. By 1990s the role of computers moves from being a tool used exclusively by scientists and technicians in laboratories to a household consumer item. 1960s Authors such as Rachel Carson and Alvin Toffler predict the negative effects of climate change and overpopulation on humanity’s future Science fiction writer, Phillip K Dick writes Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, the source of the film Blade Runner Man lands on the moon The original version of Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner is released. The term Blade Runner, not used in the original novel, is appropriated from the works of avant-garde American writer, William Burroughs. Apart from Deckard’s pursuit of the replicants, the action of the film is substantially different in detail from the novel A new director’s cut of Blade Runner is released. Deckard’s voiceover narration is eliminated, the optimistic ending of the original is cut, and the enigmatic image of the unicorn is inserted into images of Deckard’s thoughts. The 2007 DVD release of the director’s ‘final cut’, has no substantial variations on the 1992 version, but as Ridley Scott states, he has had a ‘few tweaks’ made in the editing of certain of the violent scenes, and has a much sharper image from restoration of the original negative.

12 context lead to changed values being reflected in texts:  changes in context lead to changed values being reflected in texts:  use of the language of texts,  purposes and audiences,  analysis of the content,  values and attitudes conveyed through a range of readings (different people’s points of view)

13  The language is usually highly emotional, melodramatic and threatening.  There is always more emphasis on description than dramatic action; this emphasis on description does not however involve detailed analysis of inner feelings.  The Creature's language is highly rhetorical (which could also be said for much of the book).  There is a big difference in language between the three narrators.  The Creature's eloquent language is unexpected. Instead of a grunting animal, is the impressive use of balance and opposition in his order to Victor "Remember I am thy creature; I ought to have been thy Adam; but I am rather the fallen angel, whom thou divest from joy... and I shall again be virtuous." - biblical allusions, antiquated English, fragmented sentence, repetition of the personal and high modality of “I am”

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15  Deckard Deckard is a ‘blade runner’ whose job is to track down ‘non-humans’ or replicants. His relentless pursuit is responsible for the deaths of four replicants and he spares the life of a fifth, Rachel. During his hunt, there is evidence to suggest he might be a replicant himself. At the end, he is attempting to flee the city with the replicant, Rachel, towards to an uncertain future. The five replicants are actually androids – artificial human beings designed to function on planets beyond Earth. Their sudden return to Earth causes alarm and fear because of their superhuman strength and violent tendencies.

16 Examination rubric… EXAMINATION / ASSESSMENT RUBRIC In your answer you will be assessed on how well you: ■ demonstrate understanding of the meanings of a pair of texts when considered together  what  what are the common ideas / attitudes / values / assumptions / information / human characteristics / human relationships between Frankenstein Frankenstein and Blade Runner? ■ evaluate the relationships between texts and contexts  How  How closely are the two texts similar? How How distantly are they different? Why? ■ organise, develop and express ideas using language appropriate to audience, purpose and form How? = what language / film forms and features are used in each text to show the ideas etc… Different contexts… WRITE ACCURATELY – no waffling-on… waffling-on… you must keep returning to your thesis statement

17 Which means… What are the similarities between the two texts? Comparative study of common features of both texts: … Which means… What are the similarities between the two texts? Common premise  If scientists were capable of creating life… then the resulting relationship between the creations and humans would be uneasy and tense.  The creators come to loathe their creations and try to destroy them.  The creations react with similar violence when faced with destruction  19 th C, the scientist, represented by Victor Frankenstein, was the enemy of the Creature. In the 21stC, the enemy of the replicant is the Tyrell Corporation.. Structure  The novel is structured as a ‘nest of stories’ or a “framed” narrative. One narrative inside another. Each narrative gives a different perspective on events.  In the film, there are two parallel narratives.

18  Personal letter (F) = more personal and “real” connection to the responder & develops responder’s empathy with the composer  Narrration (BL) = more personal and “real” connection to the responder & develops responder’s empathy with the composer  Descriptive, OTT language and antiquated syntax (F)  Sci – Fi – invented lexicon (BL)  irony, empathy, minor characters, tone, classical allusions, archetypal characters, contextual allusions to Freud, emotive language, bathos, pathos (F and BL)  Verisimilitude (or truthlikeness) is the quality of realism in something (such as film, literature, the arts, etc) – created through: sensory imagery, symbolism, connotations, similes, metaphors, hyperbole, irony, repetition, statistics, alliteration, juxtaposition (F and BL)

19 Analyse how Frankenstein and Blade Runner imaginatively portray individuals who challenge the established values of their time. The prescribed texts are:  Mary Shelley, Frankenstein and  Ridley Scott, Blade Runner (Director’s Cut) or (Final Cut)

20 Analyses skilfully how Frankenstein / Blade Runner portray individuals who challenge the established values of their time Demonstrates skilfully an understanding of the relationships between F and BL and their contexts using well-selected and detailed textual reference Composes a perceptive response using language appropriate to audience, purpose and form Marks 17–20

21 In better responses, candidates considered the key notion of individuals challenging established values and produced a shaped response that developed and sustained a thesis which genuinely addressed the question and which used a discerning selection of textual references. In weaker responses, candidates tended to identify some similarities between these texts, often with a limited understanding of the significance of these similarities. They often considered the key concept of established values of their time in a superficial or generalised way or ignored it. Treatment of context was not integrated into the discussion and was frequently a reference to the time of composition rather than an understanding of how context is reflected in the construction and reception of texts. They often relied on a few basic or inappropriate references to texts. In better responses, candidates considered the key notion of individuals challenging established values and produced a shaped response that developed and sustained a thesis which genuinely addressed the question and which used a discerning selection of textual references. In weaker responses, candidates tended to identify some similarities between these texts, often with a limited understanding of the significance of these similarities. They often considered the key concept of established values of their time in a superficial or generalised way or ignored it. Treatment of context was not integrated into the discussion and was frequently a reference to the time of composition rather than an understanding of how context is reflected in the construction and reception of texts. They often relied on a few basic or inappropriate references to texts. Comments from the marking centre – NSW BOS

22  evaluate how different contexts effect how composers use of medium of production, textual form, perspective and choice of language influence meaning. Weigh-up / assess Film, print, Novel, sci-fi feature film Dominant? Resistant? Subversive? Marginalised? Disenfranchised? Popular? Cultural? Christian? Non- Christian? Post-modern? Feminist? Capitalist? Marxist? Formal? Colloquial? Idioms – simile – metaphor – modality – dialogue – imagery – symbols – motifs – audio effects – camera angles, shot types and movement – contrast – irony – satire – persuasive – positive or negative tone – emotive language – factual language – stereotypes – cliches – catch phrases – journalese - Show specific ideas, events, people, values, attitudes about history and memory. Time period  Cultural, social, historical, technological


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