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LITERATURE CIRCLE Roles Descriptions. ALL MEMBERS You are each responsible for the role you are assigned for each rotation. Remember that you are a team.

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Presentation on theme: "LITERATURE CIRCLE Roles Descriptions. ALL MEMBERS You are each responsible for the role you are assigned for each rotation. Remember that you are a team."— Presentation transcript:

1 LITERATURE CIRCLE Roles Descriptions

2 ALL MEMBERS You are each responsible for the role you are assigned for each rotation. Remember that you are a team and are only as strong as your weakest member. Try to help each other and be sure to get contact information (cell numbers, addresses, etc.), so you can communicate and get completed work to each other if you are going to be absent. You will be responsible for not only the documentation for your role but also for quizzes/tests, other discussions, and various activities that come up during your reading. Don’t get behind. Neatness and accuracy does count. You are to prepare the chart for your role as indicated in this document. Be thorough, thoughtful, and accurate in your responses. All documents prepared must have complete headings (not MLA), be neat, and show pride in work ethic.

3 ALL MEMBERS Divide up the vocabulary list equitably and do the following: Make a chart with the following parts – Include the underlined words in column headings, but include in your analysis what the other words are telling you to consider! Word/ Part of Speech Text Quote/chapter/pg # (keep it brief but quote must imply context of word) Meaning in Context Sentence (you write your own sentence using the word correctly

4 ALL MEMBERS - Word Watcher cont. While reading, keep an eye out for words you have been assigned. Record the information for each word that is indicated above in preparation for the meeting. During the meeting, read the word you focused on, the text quote/pg #, and quiz members on what they thought the word meant before sharing your interpretation.

5 ROLE #1 Discussion Director Your role is to keep the discussion going and to evaluate how well each member was prepared to answer comprehension questions you propose. This is a BIG leadership job. If you are going to absent, you MUST get your documents to another member in your group to share on your behalf. You have TWO CHARTS to prepare for the meeting (see next slide).

6 Role #1 Discussion Director Chart 1 1. Chart 1 - As you read, prepare three questions YOU come up with that will create active conversation within the group. Prepare a chart for these questions, similar to “SSR” – CHART ONE Chapter/Pg #Text Quote Question Notice and Note Details Answer to Question

7 Discussion Director – Chart 2 Chart 2 -Also as you read, choose five questions from comprehension list for chapter span assigned. Write question and prepare answers on the back of the chart above. Use this format for those questions: Chapter/Pg # QuestionResponse/Text Quote (to support answer)

8 Discussion Director continued During group meeting, read each quote from chart 1 above and offer question to group. Get a few responses before sharing yours. Also during meeting, read each comprehension question and ask members to answer before sharing your responses and quotes to support.. After you complete these two tasks during the meeting, write a summary that reflects an evaluation of how each group member did during the meeting. How prepared was each member? Write your summary on the bottom or back of your chart document. You also evaluate each member on the evaluation chart.

9 Role #2 Literary Devices Hunter Find passages that contain literary devices, including text passages that use figurative language. All documents prepared must have complete headings (not MLA required), be neat, and show pride in work ethic. Make a chart with the following parts – Include the underlined words in column headings, but include in your analysis what the other words are telling you to consider! Chapter/Pg #Text Quote/Literary Device (Label which literary device following quote.) Interpretation (Of Implied or Connotative Meaning and How This Affects Understanding)

10 Literary Devices Hunter continued… While reading find no less than FOUR literary devices per chapter span. Try to not repeat the same ones (find a variety). Prepare the chart above. During the meeting, share the text quotes and inform your group what literary device you felt was used in that passage. Ask members to share their thoughts on the possible implied meaning before sharing your interpretation. Prepare a summary of the meeting for your role. Write it on the bottom or back of your chart document. Evaluate how well you think members were prepared to interpret the literary devices you shared.

11 Literary Devices Hunter continued… If Discussion Director is absent for meeting, you take over that role. Be sure you have his/her contact info. You will evaluate the Discussion Director during the meeting. Some possible literary devices to consider: Simile Metaphor Hyperbole Personification Symbolism Verbal Irony Mood Allusion Dramatic Irony Situational Irony Idiom Dialect Internal Conflict External Conflict Tone

12 Role #3 Big Idea Master Your role is to look for the “big ideas” within the chapter. These interpretations usually center on either: Themes – fundamental and often universal ideas explored in a literary work Motifs – recurring structures, contrasts, and literary devices that can help to develop and inform the text’s major themes Symbols – objects, characters, figures, and colors used to represent abstract ideas or concepts.

13 Big Idea Master continued… Big Idea” Master requirements: Make a chart with the following parts – Include the underlined words in column headings, but include in your analysis what the other words are telling you to consider! Chapter /Pg # Big Idea (Label what you found – theme, motif, or symbol) Text Quote Interpretation (Analyze how big idea was used, connotative meaning, how it affects story, characters, etc.)

14 Big Idea Master, continued… While reading, find no less than FOUR big ideas for that chapter span, and use the above chart to record your analysis. Be complete and thoughtful in your notes. Don’t assume anyone knows your analysis unless you write it down! During the meeting, read each text quote, quiz the members on what big idea might be implied, and ask for their interpretations before sharing your own. Prepare a summary of the meeting for your role. Write it on the bottom or back of your chart document. Evaluate how well you think members were prepared to interpret the big ideas you shared.

15 Role #4 Signpost Sentinel Your job is to keep an eye out for Notice and Note Signposts to help yourself and your group to have deeper analysis of the text. The Signposts and chart analysis is as follows, and you need to set up your paper with these columns for the signposts you find. You need to find at least three signposts per each rotation (not per chapter).

16 Contrasts and Contradictions Signpost Contrasts and Contradictions (When character acts in an unexpected or opposite way) “Text Entry” & Pg # Why was it unexpected? Why did character act this way? What author was showing reader…

17 Tough Questions Signpost Tough Questions (When character faced with difficult decision or inner conflict) “Text Entry” & Pg# Why is it tough “?” What do I now wonder about? Importance in story? In LIFE?

18 Memory Moment Signpost Memory Moment (aka – “Flashback” – When author stops flow of story so character can remember something) “Text Entry” & Pg# Memory/ Flashback Importance in story? Meaning in LIFE?

19 Again and Again Signpost Again and Again (When the author keeps bringing up the same image, phrase, or reference) “Text Entry” & Pg# of Repeated part Meaning within story? Importance in story relating to LIFE?

20 Words of the Wiser Signpost Words of the Wiser (When older/wiser character gives advice or an insight to main character) “Text Entry” & Pg# Who is giving advice to whom? What is the advice? Importance in story? Importance in story and in LIFE?

21 AHA Moment Signpost Aha Moment (When character realizes or starts to realize something that changes course of action or thinking) “Text Entry” & Pg# of when the Aha Moment happened What will character do or think now? Importance in story and in LIFE?

22 Signpost Sentinel – How to Focus While you’re reading, you will be on the look-out for these signposts. When they come up, you need to recognize them and record them, using the appropriate column headings for the ones you find. You need at least one per chapter. During the meeting you will show your group the signposts you found in the chapter span and discuss your thinking strategies based on your chart notes. You will also summarize how the meeting went and how others discussed your signpost findings.

23 For Groups of Five – Role #5 The Connector Your job is to make connections with what you are reading to other elements and experiences outside the novel itself. You must connect the story to either: (text to self) events in your own life (text to world) news events, political events, or historical events (text to text) books you’ve read, movies or other visuals you have seen, etc. The connections should be meaningful to you so that significance is communicated to your group. Try to think beyond the obvious and be detailed in your explanation of the connections.

24 Connector, continued… Prepare a chart with the following parts – Include the underlined words in column headings, but include in your analysis what the other words are telling you to consider! Chapter/Pg #Text Quote/ Interpretation (of what was happening during the story) Connection/ Explanation (what type of connection and full explanation of how and why you made the connection)

25 Connector, continued… 1. During your reading, make at least FOUR meaningful connections for that chapter span rotation (not per chapter) and LABEL the type you’re making. Record detailed thoughts according to the chart above. 2. During the meeting, read each text quote, giving the page # so others can read along. Ask what connections others made to those passages before sharing your own thoughts about your connections. 3. Prepare a summary of the meeting for your role. Write it on the bottom or back of your chart document. Evaluate how well you think members were prepared to make connections to the text quotes you shared.


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