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Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Human Anatomy & Physiology, Sixth Edition Elaine N. Marieb PowerPoint ® Lecture.

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Presentation on theme: "Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Human Anatomy & Physiology, Sixth Edition Elaine N. Marieb PowerPoint ® Lecture."— Presentation transcript:

1 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Human Anatomy & Physiology, Sixth Edition Elaine N. Marieb PowerPoint ® Lecture Slides prepared by Vince Austin, University of Kentucky 10 The Muscular System

2 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Major Skeletal Muscles: Anterior View  The 40 superficial muscles here are divided into 10 regional areas of the body Figure 10.4b

3 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Major Skeletal Muscles: Posterior View  The 27 superficial muscles here are divided into seven regional areas of the body Figure 10.5b

4 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Muscles: Name, and Action  Name and description of the muscle – be alert to information about the muscle given in the name  Origin and insertion – there is always a joint between the origin and insertion  Action – best learned by acting out a muscle’s movement on one’s own body

5 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Muscles of the Face Figure 10.6

6 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Muscles of Mastication Figure 10.7a

7 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Figure 10.8a Muscles of the Anterior Neck and Throat

8 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings

9 Deeper Muscles of the Neck: Anterior Figure 10.9a

10 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Deeper Muscles of the Neck: Posterior Figure 10.9b

11 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Deep Back Muscles Figure 10.9d

12 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Muscles of Respiration  The primary function of deep thoracic muscles is to promote movement for breathing  External intercostals – more superficial layer that lifts the rib cage and increases thoracic volume to allow inspiration Figure 10.10a

13 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Muscles of Respiration  Internal intercostals – deeper layer that aids in forced expiration  Diaphragm – most important muscle in inspiration Figure 10.10a

14 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Muscles of Respiration: The Diaphragm Figure 10.10b

15 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings

16 Muscles of the Abdominal Wall Figure 10.11a

17 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Muscles of the Abdominal Wall Figure 10.11b

18 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Muscles of the Abdominal Wall Figure 10.11c

19 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Extrinsic Shoulder Muscles Figure 10.13a

20 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Extrinsic Shoulder Muscles Figure 10.13b

21 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Muscles Crossing the Shoulder Figure 10.14a

22 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Muscles Crossing the Shoulder Figure 10.14d

23 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Muscles Crossing the Shoulder Figure 10.14c

24 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Muscles Crossing the Elbow Forearm extension  The triceps brachii is the prime mover of forearm extension Forearm flexion  Brachialis and biceps brachii are the chief forearm flexors  The brachioradialis acts as a synergist and helps stabilize the elbow

25 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Muscles of the Forearm  The two functional forearm muscle groups are: those that cause wrist movement, and those that move the fingers and the thumb  These muscles insert via strong ligaments called flexor retinacula and extensor retinacula  Anteriomedial compartment - flexors and pronators  Posterolateral compartment - extensors and supinator  The pronator teres and pronator quadratus are not flexors, but pronate the forearm  The supinator muscle is a synergist with the biceps brachii in supinating the forearm

26 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Forearm: Superficial Anterior Compartment  These muscles are primarily flexors of the wrist and fingers and pronators Figure 10.15a

27 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Forearm: Deeper Anterior Compartment Figure 10.15b, c Deep Deepest

28 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Forearm: Superficial Posterior Compartment  These muscles are primarily extensors of the wrist and fingers Figure 10.16a

29 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Forearm: Deep Posterior Compartment  These muscles are primarily extensors of the wrist and fingers and the supinator Figure 10.16b

30 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Muscles Crossing Hip and Knee Joints Anterior compartment (most) muscles of the hip and thigh flex the femur at the hip and extend the leg at the knee  Extend the leg (anterior compartment) Posterior compartment muscles of the hip and thigh extend the thigh and flex the leg  Flex and extend the thigh (posterior compartment) Medial compartment muscles all adduct the thigh  Adduct the thigh (medial compartment)  These three groups are enclosed by the fascia lata

31 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings  The most important thigh flexors are the iliopsoas (prime mover), tensor fasciae latae, and rectus femoris  The medially located adductor muscles and sartorius assist in flexion Movements of the Thigh at the Hip: Flexion and Extension

32 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings  Thigh extension is primarily effected by the hamstrings (biceps femoris, semitendinosus, and semimembranosus)  Forceful extension is aided by the gluteus maximus Movements of the Thigh at the Hip: Flexion and Extension

33 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Figure 10.19a

34 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings  Abduction and rotation are effected by the gluteus medius and gluteus minimus, and are antagonized by the lateral rotators  Thigh adduction is the role of five adductor muscles (adductor magnus, adductor longus, and adductor brevis; the pectineus, and the gracilis) Movements of the Thigh at the Hip: Other Movements

35 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Figure 10.20a * *

36 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Movements of the Thigh at the Hip: Other Movements Figure 10.20b

37 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Movements: Knee Joint  sole extensor of the knee  quadriceps femoris  flex the knee, and are antagonists to the quadriceps femoris  hamstrings Figure 10.19a

38 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Muscles of the Anterior Compartment primary toe extensors and ankle dorsiflexors  tibialis anterior  extensor digitorum longus  extensor hallucis longus  fibularis (peroneus) tertius Figure 10.21a

39 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Figure 10.21b-d Muscles of the Anterior Compartment ISOLATED

40 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Muscles of the Lateral Compartment plantar flex and evert the foot  fibularis longus  fibularis brevis Figure 10.22a

41 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Figure 10.22b, c Muscles of the Lateral Compartment - ISOLATED

42 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Muscles of the Posterior Compartment primarily flex the foot and the toes  gastrocnemius  soleus  tibialis posterior  flexor digitorum longus  flexor hallucis longus Figure 10.23a

43 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Muscles of the Posterior Compartment - DEEP Figure 10.23b, c Deep

44 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Muscles of the Posterior Compartment - DEEPEST Figure 10.23b, c Deepest * * *

45 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Figure 10.23d-f Muscles of the Posterior Compartment - ISOLATED


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