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Presented by John Black and Robert Gray Arizona Department of Education WHAT TO DO WHEN A SCHOOL EARNS A “D” OR “F” UNDER THE NEW STATE LAW?

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Presentation on theme: "Presented by John Black and Robert Gray Arizona Department of Education WHAT TO DO WHEN A SCHOOL EARNS A “D” OR “F” UNDER THE NEW STATE LAW?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Presented by John Black and Robert Gray Arizona Department of Education WHAT TO DO WHEN A SCHOOL EARNS A “D” OR “F” UNDER THE NEW STATE LAW?

2 WHAT IS THE A-F SYSTEM? Data is used differently than is was in the legacy AZ LEARNS system. A-F is based on percent of students passing the test plus growth components of all students and the bottom 25% of students. Note: the bottom 25% of students get counted twice in the growth portion – total student growth and the bottom 25% growth.

3 WHAT IS THE A-F SYSTEM? Some similarities to the legacy AZ LEARNS system, however, calculations are made differently. Scores are based on: Percent Passing AIMS Growth for all students Growth for the bottom 25% D+D+D=F All Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools are automatically given F.

4 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIVING A GRADE OF “D” Notify each residence within the attendance area of the school. Explain the improvement plan process and date and time of the public meeting. See ARS § for reference

5 90 DAYS AFTER RECEIVING A GRADE OF “D” The governing board shall: develop an improvement plan for the school, submit a copies of the plan to the ADE AND county school superintendent of your county supervise the implementation of the plan.

6 30 DAYS AFTER PLAN SUBMISSION The governing board shall hold a special public meeting in each school that has been assigned a letter grade of D to present the respective improvement plans. ARS §15-241

7 IF THE PLAN IS NOT SUBMITTED ON TIME Withholding of 301 funds equal to each day that it is late plus an additional 90 days The superintendent of the district will testify before the state board of education to explain the reasons the lateness.

8 WHAT HAPPENS IF THE SCHOOLS RECEIVES AN F? My school didn’t have 3 D’s, so why did we receive an F? Could be a combination of Underperforming from the old (legacy) system and D’s Your school is on the list of Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools

9 WHAT HAPPENS NEXT Within 60 days: Governing Board evaluates existing plan for needed changes Board submits new plan to Superintendent of Public Instruction and County School Superintendent’s office

10 WHAT HAPPENS NEXT Within 30 days of submitting the plan The Governing Board shall hold a public meeting in each school with an F label The Board shall present to the public it’s plan for improving the school

11 CHARTER SCHOOLS THAT RECEIVE AND F The Arizona Department of Education shall notify the charter school’s sponsor. The charter school’s sponsor shall take action to restore the school to an acceptable level of performance or revoke the school’s charter Within 30 days of receiving the label of F, the school must notify the parents of the students attending the school.

12 WHERE TO FOCUS IF YOUR SCHOOL RECEIVES A “D” OR “F” Don’t spend your time focusing on the label as it will not help you move in the right direction. Do spend your time looking at your school’s data and make decisions on why the students are not learning. Is your curriculum not aligned? Do your formative and benchmark assessments not measure what has been taught? Is there one subject that is creating a problem or group of students that is having a difficult time? Here’s where a good needs assessment can help you design a plan that will support student achievement.

13 THE LOGIC OF STANDARDS-BASED REFORM Students from different groups are not being taught the same high standards. So, create high standards that apply to all groups of students. Align assessments and accountability systems to those standards. Provide appropriate professional development. And, achievement will rise and gaps will diminish.

14 The logic of standards-based reform (as it is implemented currently in the United States) depends heavily on several huge assumptions. The Problem:

15 1. EDUCATORS WILL WANT TO WORK HARD TO TEACH NEW CONTENT IN NEW WAYS. We assume educators will work hard to improve their teaching, in spite of concerns about issues such as safety, staff conflict, and poor facilities. We assume federal and state accountability provisions will influence educator effort positively. In high-performing schools and districts, leaders work diligently to address educator needs and inspire commitment to changing students’ lives.

16 2. STUDENTS WILL WANT TO WORK HARD TO LEARN NEW CONTENT. We assume students will work hard in spite of their concerns about personal safety, lack of belonging, and general sense that they are not valued. We assume students will work hard because of new consequences attached to low achievement. In high-performing schools and districts, leaders help students dream new futures. They help students perceive that educators care deeply about each student’s personal success and well- being.

17 3. EDUCATORS BELIEVE IT IS POSSIBLE FOR THEIR STUDENTS TO LEARN THE STANDARDS. We assume educators believe THEIR students can learn challenging standards, given good instruction. In high-performing schools and districts, leaders use local data and data from similar schools to dispel myths about who cannot achieve challenging standards. Leaders take on disbelievers in a respectful, but forceful way. They celebrate little successes in ways that change expectations.

18 4. EDUCATORS KNOW THE CONTENT WELL ENOUGH TO TEACH THE STANDARDS. We assume educators have a deep understanding of the content in and around each standard. In high-performing schools and districts, leaders stimulate frequent conversations about the content related to each standard. They find non-threatening ways to get teachers additional help when needed. Professional development is part of the culture of these schools.

19 5. EDUCATORS KNOW HOW TO TEACH STANDARDS TO DIVERSE GROUPS OF STUDENTS. We assume educators know how to teach standards in ways that respond to the interests, strengths, and backgrounds of the diverse groups of students in their classrooms. In high-performing schools and districts, there is regular collaboration focused upon instructional strategies that will respond to the diverse strengths and needs of students. Teachers are constantly learning from each other’s most effective practices.

20 6. EDUCATORS KNOW HOW TO TEACH REQUIRED STANDARDS IN THE ALLOTTED TIME. We assume educators know how to teach everything the state deems important, to the level of skill expected, in 36 weeks. In high-performing schools and districts, there is a deliberate effort to teach with greater depth and less breadth. As well, there are deliberate efforts to provide quality early learning opportunities and extra learning time, as needed.

21 7. EDUCATORS KNOW HOW TO ASSESS STUDENT PROGRESS AND ADJUST INSTRUCTION. We assume educators know how to determine if students are learning standards. As well, we assume educators know how to adjust instruction when students are not learning well. In high-performing schools and districts, systems provide educators interim information that is used to improve instruction. As well, teachers learn to seek evidence of understanding as they provide instruction.

22 8. EDUCATORS KNOW HOW TO RELATE TO AND CONNECT WITH PARENTS/COMMUNITY. We assume educators know how to relate to and connect with diverse parent/community groups in ways that create great synergy between home and school. In high-performing schools and districts, leaders work to build trust and positive relationships with parents and community groups.

23 9. LEADERS KNOW HOW TO HELP TEACHERS LEARN TO TEACH STANDARDS TO ALL STUDENTS. We assume school leaders know how to be instructional leaders, how to influence instruction, and how to help teachers improve instruction for diverse groups of students. In high-performing schools and districts, leaders spend large percentages of time in classrooms, working on instructional issues. As well, they invest time in developing their own instructional strengths.

24 10. LEADERS KNOW HOW TO MONITOR PROGRESS AND ADAPT PROGRAMS AND PRACTICES. We assume school leaders know how to monitor the extent to which programs and practices are working to improve achievement for all groups of students. In high-performing districts, leaders have support as they collect and use data to identify the merits and deficits of programs and practices.

25 THE BIG QUESTIONS Which students need assistance? What specific skills do they need to succeed this year? Which teachers need assistance? Which specific skills do they need to succeed this year? KEEP DRILLING UNTIL YOU FIND SPECIFIC ANSWERS

26 OUR DATA SYSTEMS PROVIDE... A) Not enough data B) Just the right amount of data C) Too much data! We’re drowning in it. D) We do not have a data system

27 THE LEAST HELPFUL DATA FOR IMPROVING INSTRUCTION State Averages District Averages School Averages Grade-level Averages

28 WHAT DO DISTRICT AND SCHOOL AVERAGES TELL US ABOUT... Individual student performance? Individual teacher performance? Subject matter performance? Curriculum priorities? Intervention plans?

29 WHEN IN DOUBT... Choose specificity over generalities Choose individual class data over school and district data Choose individual student data over group data Choose standards-based data over norm-based data Choose content data over full-test data Choose individual item data over content data

30 THE GENERAL RULE If I can’t use it to make better teaching and leadership decisions, then it’s just data, not information.

31 SUPPLEMENTARY MEASUREMENTS Benchmark assessments Formative assessments Classroom assessments Report card grades Narratives by teachers, peers, and students What additional supplementary measurements are you using?


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