Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

The BIG Question… Can lovers see clearly? An old saying says, “Love is blind.” Is this true? The thrill of falling in love can cloud one’s perceptions.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "The BIG Question… Can lovers see clearly? An old saying says, “Love is blind.” Is this true? The thrill of falling in love can cloud one’s perceptions."— Presentation transcript:

1 The BIG Question… Can lovers see clearly? An old saying says, “Love is blind.” Is this true? The thrill of falling in love can cloud one’s perceptions of a lover, but usually those clouds drift away over time. Is it possible to see a person’s faults clearly and still love him or her? Answer on your handout for our closing activity Answer on your handout for our closing activity. Bell Work

2 William Shakespeare Widely regarded as the greatest writer in English Literature Reintroduction to

3 A few basic notes on Shakespeare, the man. Born April Died (April 23) 1616

4 Shakespeare Born in Stratford-on- Avon, England Started out as an actor Wrote 37 plays Wrote about 154 sonnets

5 Shakespeare’s Birthplace

6 Anne Hathaway Grew up on a farm in Shottery about a mile from Stratford-on-Avon 25 or 26 when they married- considered an old maid, but she had a dowry Shakespeare was 17 or 18 when they married She was pregnant before they were married—a scandal Shakespeare’s Wife

7 Shakespeare’s wife’s house Hewland Farm in Shottery

8 Holy Trinity parish church- Stratford Upon Avon where Shakespeare is buried You can go in and see his grave and those of his wife and children.

9 There he is! Look how sad we are! Why? Because he is dead!

10 So, about love and what you call “talking” to a person your are interested in… In what ways do you let that person know you are interested in courting or wooing him or her? Wooing

11 What is a sonnet ? A sonnet is a 14-line verse form (poem) usually having one of several conventional rhyme schemes. Shakespeare’s sonnets contain three quatrains (four lines) and couplet (two lines) at the end. The quatrains set up a problem or theme (often love) and the couplet solves it.

12 Iambic pentameter The English or Shakespearean sonnet is written in iambic pentameter (PEN-ta-meter or pen- TAM-e-ter). It was the beat of the 16 th century. The syllables are divided into five pairs called iambs or iambic feet. An iamb is a metrical unit made up of one unstressed syllable followed by one stressed syllable. An example of an iamb would be good BYE. A line of iambic pentameter flows like this: baBOOM / baBOOM / baBOOM / baBOOM / baBOOM

13 Iambic pentameter When I / do COUNT / the CLOCK / that TELLS / the TIME (Sonnet 12)Sonnet 12 When I do count the clock that tells the time. I ALL / a LONE / be WEEP / my OUT/ cast STATE (Sonnet 29)Sonnet 29 I all alone beweep my outcast state. Shall I / com PARE/ thee TO / a SUM / mer’s DAY? (Sonnet 18)Sonnet 18 Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? WHY? Examples from Shakespearean sonnets:

14 IAMBIC PENTAMETER Iambic pentameter An visual and audio example:

15 That time of year thou mayst in me behold (a) When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang (b) Upon those boughs which shake against the cold, (a) Bare ruin'd choirs, where late the sweet birds sang. (b) In me thou seest the twilight of such day (c) As after sunset fadeth in the west, (d) Which by and by black night doth take away, (c) Death's second self, that seals up all in rest. (d) In me thou see'st the glowing of such fire (e) That on the ashes of his youth doth lie, (f) As the death-bed whereon it must expire (e) Consumed with that which it was nourish'd by. (f) This thou perceivest, which makes thy love more strong, (g) To love that well which thou must leave ere long. (g) Sonnet 73

16 Taking each quatrain separately, we will analyze the problem or topic set up by the sonnet: First Quatrain That time of year thou mayst in me behold When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang Upon those boughs which shake against the cold, Bare ruin'd choirs, where late the sweet birds sang. To whom do you think the speaker speaking? What imagery clues are there to the age of the speaker? Sonnet 73

17 Second Quatrain In me thou seest the twilight of such day As after sunset fadeth in the west, Which by and by black night doth take away, Death's second self, that seals up all in rest. How does this quatrain echo the first? What might “Death’s second self” be? What might “seals up all in rest” suggest? Sonnet 73

18 Third Quatrain In me thou see'st the glowing of such fire That on the ashes of his youth doth lie, As the death-bed whereon it must expire Consumed with that which it was nourish'd by. Each quatrain is addressed personally. When you see the embers of a glowing fire, what was there before it? How is the speaker using this image? What is the “it” in the third line? Now, what idea do you think the three quatrains introduce? Sonnet 73

19 The couplet This thou perceivest, which makes thy love more strong, To love that well which thou must leave ere long. Again, the speaker addresses his love directly. Why does the speaker think his lover/partner’s love will become stronger as death nears? Do you agree with this conclusion? What do you feel is the tone of this sonnet? The tone of a literary work is the perspective or attitude that the author adopts and can portray a variety of emotions to help the reader ascertain the writer’s feelings toward a particular topic, influencing the reader’s understanding of the literary work. Sonnet 73

20 That time of year thou mayst in me behold (a) When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang (b) Upon those boughs which shake against the cold, (a) Bare ruin'd choirs, where late the sweet birds sang. (b) In me thou seest the twilight of such day (c) As after sunset fadeth in the west, (d) Which by and by black night doth take away, (c) Death's second self, that seals up all in rest. (d) In me thou see'st the glowing of such fire (e) That on the ashes of his youth doth lie, (f) As the death-bed whereon it must expire (e) Consumed with that which it was nourish'd by. (f) This thou perceivest, which makes thy love more strong, (g) To love that well which thou must leave ere long. (g) What is the purpose of this sonnet? Its tone? Sonnet 73

21 Practice  Your group will be assigned a quatrain of the Sonnet 137 to analyze.  Read the entire sonnet aloud, then focus on your quatrain by rereading it and analyzing its meaning and recording it for sharing.  Then, look at the couplet and determine its meaning.  Decide what tone you feel the speaker is implying

22 My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun; Coral is far more red than her lips’ red; If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun*; If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. I have seen roses damask’d**, red and white, But no such roses see I in her cheeks, And in some perfumes is there more delight Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks*** I love to hear her speak, yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound; I grant I never saw a goddess go, My mistress when she walks treads on the ground. And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare As any she belied**** with false compare. *a dull, grayish color **silk ***stink ****contradict Sonnet 137 Group s 1 & 3 Group s 2 & 6 Group s 4 & 5 All Group s

23 Using the text, have one member of the team read the sonnet aloud, then answer the Text Analysis questions for each sonnet on pages 326, 328, and 329 using the back of your handout. Remember, you are working as a GROUP. Discuss your ideas with your group mates and come to a conclusion before you record the answers. Assessment: Today, I will take ONE of the worksheets at random to assess for a grade, so make sure your group number is on every paper. In future, you will analyze a sonnet on your own to show mastery. At that point we will determine whether or not I must reteach this so all of you achieve mastery of the analysis of Elizabethan/Shakesperean sonnets. In your groups

24 Look back at what you wrote about lovers and whether or not they see clearly. Take two minutes to come up with a statement for your whole group about that idea. One person will report to the class. Closing

25 2 nd Nine weeks groups – 6 th Period Group 3 Ian Coyner Richard Taylor Kole Shipp Macey Capps Cortavious Nelson Group 4 Anthony Hutchings Matt Adcock Tiara Smith Taylor Cottrell Group 1 Trevor Boltz Kevin Reed Raven Miller Jasmine Wheeler Tijuandre Garrett Group 2 Heath Covington Teresa Sy Tad Onwu Jason Wyatt Taylor McBurney Group 5 Savannah Lawson Jalen Campbell Carrigan Summers Jamarious Johnson Group 6 Abby Norris Austin Dye Maya Watson Logan Minshall

26 2 nd Nine weeks groups – 3 rd Period Group 2 Zach Feaster Shane Heady Jamie Miller Kristian King Group 5 Stephen Ford Austin Hulme Bernice LaQuart Allison Mitchell Group 1 Maritza Badillo De’Andre Banks Alyndria Carroll Adrianna Evans Kay Smith Group 4 Brittany Clement Jerricho Duff Morgan Evans Ora Mintlow Nesha Wilson Group 3 William Mueller Dillon Raper Mikayla Rivera Smitty Smithson Group 6 Aaron Nouanesabap Qyiesha Smalls Jay Smartt Anna Smith

27 2 nd Nine weeks groups – 5 th Period Group 3 Tamara Booker Kelsey Woodard Mariko Odom Adam Mayo Allison Elliot Group 4 Logan Goad Mariah Cornish Markel Payne Savannah Casto Group 1 Manaf Al Kaissi Connor Wilson Bailey Johnson Alton Itsaleumsack Angelina Newkirk Group 2 Anthony Beaver Kaylin Witas Kirk Neal Travis Martin Madison Smith Group 5 Daniel Good Justin Haynes Courtney Raburn Alex Reach Group 6 Dalton Messenger Taylor Howse Shay Bowers Rakias Ivy

28 2 nd Nine weeks groups – 7 th Period Group 3 Jordan Sanders Jena Goodman A-One Man Brock Burdett Group 4 Ashleigh Lozier Lauren McCluskey Lauren Mankin Jenessa Hamilton Maj Ahmad Group 1 Sarah Bertrand Rodrickas Collins RJ Cunningham Nicole Vasco Trey Niewiemski Group 2 Monica Onate McKenna Earp Daryka Battle Jamie Underwood Blake Speck Group 5 Dania Cortez Shamesha Talley Kenneth Mathews Benjamin Hardebeck Josh Deleon Group 6 Melissa Crutchfield Hunter Taylor Kirsten McCormick Ethan Hassell Ricky Philachack

29 Closing


Download ppt "The BIG Question… Can lovers see clearly? An old saying says, “Love is blind.” Is this true? The thrill of falling in love can cloud one’s perceptions."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google