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Poetry Analysis Shakespearean Sonnet. Rhyme Scheme My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun William Shakespeare My mistress' eyes are nothing like the.

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Presentation on theme: "Poetry Analysis Shakespearean Sonnet. Rhyme Scheme My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun William Shakespeare My mistress' eyes are nothing like the."— Presentation transcript:

1 Poetry Analysis Shakespearean Sonnet

2 Rhyme Scheme My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun William Shakespeare My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; Coral is far more red than her lips' red: If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. I have seen roses damask'd, red and white, But no such roses see I in her cheeks; And in some perfumes is there more delight Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. I love to hear her speak,--yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound; I grant I never saw a goddess go, My mistress when she walks, treads on the ground; And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare As any she, belied with false compare. Determine the rhyming pattern of the poem.

3 Rhyme Scheme My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun William Shakespeare My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; a Coral is far more red than her lips' red: b If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; a If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. b I have seen roses damask'd, red and white, c But no such roses see I in her cheeks; d And in some perfumes is there more delight c Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. d I love to hear her speak,--yet well I know e That music hath a far more pleasing sound; f I grant I never saw a goddess go, e My mistress when she walks, treads on the ground; f And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare g As any she, belied with false compare. g

4 Rhythm and Meter Scan the lines to determine rhythm and meter. My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; Coral is far more red than her lips' red:

5 Rhythm and Meter ~ / ~ / ~ / ~ / ~ / My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; ~ / ~ / ~ / ~ / ~ / Coral is far more red than her lips' red: Iambic pentameter

6 Quatrains My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun William Shakespeare My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; Coral is far more red than her lips' red: If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. What type of sensory imagery is demonstrated in the first quatrain (first four lines)?

7 Quatrains My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun William Shakespeare My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; Coral is far more red than her lips' red: If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. Sight What type of sensory imagery is demonstrated in the first quatrain (first four lines)?

8 Quatrains My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun William Shakespeare... I have seen roses damask'd, red and white, But no such roses see I in her cheeks; And in some perfumes is there more delight Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. What type of sensory imagery is demonstrated in the second quatrain?

9 Quatrains My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun William Shakespeare... I have seen roses damask'd, red and white, But no such roses see I in her cheeks; And in some perfumes is there more delight Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. Smell What type of sensory imagery is demonstrated in the second quatrain?

10 Quatrains My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun William Shakespeare... I love to hear her speak,--yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound; I grant I never saw a goddess go, My mistress when she walks, treads on the ground; What type of sensory imagery is demonstrated in the third quatrain?

11 Quatrains My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun William Shakespeare... I love to hear her speak,--yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound; I grant I never saw a goddess go, My mistress when she walks, treads on the ground; Sound What type of sensory imagery is demonstrated in the third quatrain?

12 Similes My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun William Shakespeare My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; Coral is far more red than her lips' red: If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. I have seen roses damask'd, red and white, But no such roses see I in her cheeks; And in some perfumes is there more delight Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. I love to hear her speak,--yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound; I grant I never saw a goddess go, My mistress when she walks, treads on the ground; And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare As any she, belied with false compare. What comparisons do lines 1, 2, and 7- 8 make?

13 Metaphors My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun William Shakespeare My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; Coral is far more red than her lips' red: If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. I have seen roses damask'd, red and white, But no such roses see I in her cheeks; And in some perfumes is there more delight Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. I love to hear her speak,--yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound; I grant I never saw a goddess go, My mistress when she walks, treads on the ground; And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare As any she, belied with false compare. What comparisons do lines 3, 4, 5-6, 9- 10, and depict?

14 Irony My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun William Shakespeare My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; Coral is far more red than her lips' red: If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. I have seen roses damask'd, red and white, But no such roses see I in her cheeks; And in some perfumes is there more delight Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. I love to hear her speak,--yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound; I grant I never saw a goddess go, My mistress when she walks, treads on the ground; And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare As any she, belied with false compare. How does the final couplet serve as an ironic twist for the conclusion?

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