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The Stirrings of Rebellion US History-10.15.13. Outline notes New method while reading Subheadings=main ideas Each subheading has bullet points outlining.

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Presentation on theme: "The Stirrings of Rebellion US History-10.15.13. Outline notes New method while reading Subheadings=main ideas Each subheading has bullet points outlining."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Stirrings of Rebellion US History

2 Outline notes New method while reading Subheadings=main ideas Each subheading has bullet points outlining the details of that heading Example: Main Idea = Subheading Detail Further information

3 The Colonies Organize to Resist Britain The Stamp Act Required colonists to buy stamped paper for every legal document, newspapers, etc. EVERY colonist was affected If they broke the law on the Stamp Act, they would be tried in court/convicted Stamp Act Protests Sons of Liberty Led by political activist, Samuel Adams Organized to protest the Stamp Act Patrick Henry Put forth a resolution in the Virginia Assembly: Virginian’s could only be taxed by the Virginia Assembly/their own representatives Merchants in Boston, New York, and Philadelphia did not import goods until the Stamp Act was repealed. It worked until Parliament passed the Declaratory Act: Asserted Parliaments right to make laws that bound the colonists in all cases.

4 The Colonies Organize to Resist Britain The Townsend Acts Charles Townsend figured out a new way to collect money from colonists Indirect taxes Taxes on imported materials that went into the colonies from Britain Three penny tax on tea, the colonies’ most popular drink Colonists continue to protest “Taxation without representation” Sam Adams called for more protests specifically on British goods Women became involved by protesting lavish British fabrics and adornments Conflicts intensify British seized John Hancock’s ship, Liberty Said Hancock imported goods from Madeira and did not pay his tax British stationed “Redcoats,” or British soldiers in Boston

5 Tension Mounts in Massachusetts The Boston Massacre March 5, 1770 Fight broke out over jobs Colonists were looking for work as were the British colonists who were not paid well Crispus Attucks and dockhands arrived outside a Customs House. He was killed An attack on a British boat later broke out in Rhode Island. The attackers were brought to England for trial. Committees of Correspondence Linked leaders in all colonies to communicate about threats to America. The Boston Tea Party British East India Company was hit hard by colonial tea boycotts and about to go bankrupt with 17,000 million pounds of tea in warehouses Wanted to sell tea to the colonies free of taxes Colonists protested on December 16, 1773 Colonists dressed at “Indians” dumped 18,000 pounds of tea into the Boston Harbor QUESTION: Why would the colonists be angry about the desire to sell tea to the colonists at a cheaper price?

6 Tension Mounts in Massachusetts Intolerable Acts: King George III was angry of destruction of British property Shut down harbor Quartering Act: Housing of soldiers Martial Law: rule by the military Colonial Response First Continental Congress September delegates met in Philadelphia Declaration of Colonial Rights Defended the colonies’ rights to run their own affairs

7 Fighting Erupts at Lexington and Concord Minutemen Civilian soldiers stocked up on firearms Spring 1775: British General Gage sent troops to look for the stockpiles of firearms and ruin them Gage got news of where Hancock and S. Adams were and planned to seize them “The Redcoats are coming!” Adams and Hancock were in hiding as the colonists heard rumors of the attack The resistance leadership was then led by Dr. Joseph Warren Warren assigned Paul Revere, of the Sons of Liberty to gather messengers to warn people Revere warned Adams and Hancock to escape and warned other colonists of the attack “This is a glorious day for America,”-Sam Adams The British made it to Lexington where they defeated the colonists When they made it to Concord the colonists slaughtered the British Adams and Hancock could hear the gunshots as they rode off deeper into hiding. QUESTION: Why was it so important that Adams and Hancock were not injured?


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