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Sentence Types. I. Simple Sentence A. A simple sentence is one independent clause by itself.

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Presentation on theme: "Sentence Types. I. Simple Sentence A. A simple sentence is one independent clause by itself."— Presentation transcript:

1 Sentence Types

2 I. Simple Sentence

3 A. A simple sentence is one independent clause by itself.

4 I. Simple Sentence A. A simple sentence is one independent clause by itself. B. Examples: 1. My mother belongs to a club.

5 I. Simple Sentence A. A simple sentence is one independent clause by itself. B. Examples: 1. My mother belongs to a club. 2. Argentina and Chile are in South America.

6 I. Simple Sentence A. A simple sentence is one independent clause by itself. B. Examples: 1. My mother belongs to a club. 2. Argentina and Chile are in South America. 3. James read Stuart Little and reported on it.

7 I. Simple Sentence A. A simple sentence is one independent clause by itself. B. Examples: 1. My mother belongs to a club. 2. Argentina and Chile are in South America. 3. James read Stuart Little and reported on it. II. Compound Sentence A. A compound sentence has two or more independent clauses that are joined by a comma and a connecting word.

8 B. In compound sentences, a conjunction connects the sentences.

9 C. A comma comes before the conjunction.

10 B. In compound sentences, a conjunction connects the sentences. C. A comma comes before the conjunction. D. Examples: 1. I forgot my lunch, but dad ran to the bus with it.

11 B. In compound sentences, a conjunction connects the sentences. C. A comma comes before the conjunction. D. Examples: 1. I forgot my lunch, but dad ran to the bus with it. 2. She likes sweets, yet she seldom eats them.

12 B. In compound sentences, a conjunction connects the sentences. C. A comma comes before the conjunction. D. Examples: 1. I forgot my lunch, but dad ran to the bus with it. 2. She likes sweets, yet she seldom eats them. E. Sometimes the independent clauses in a compound sentence are joined by a semi-colon ( ; )

13 B. In compound sentences, a conjunction connects the sentences. C. A comma comes before the conjunction. D. Examples: 1. I forgot my lunch, but dad ran to the bus with it. 2. She likes sweets, yet she seldom eats them. E. Sometimes the independent clauses in a compound sentence are joined by a semi-colon ( ; ) F. If they are joined by a semi-colon, do not use a connecting word.

14 G. Examples: 1. The blue one is mine; it has my initials on it.

15 G. Examples: 1. The blue one is mine; it has my initials on it. 2. A spider is not an insect; it is an arachnid.

16 G. Examples: 1. The blue one is mine; it has my initials on it. 2. A spider is not an insect; it is an arachnid. III. Complex Sentence A. A complex sentence has one independent clause and one or more dependent clauses.

17 G. Examples: 1. The blue one is mine; it has my initials on it. 2. A spider is not an insect; it is an arachnid. III. Complex Sentence A. A complex sentence has one independent clause and one or more dependent clauses. B. The dependent clause can be at the beginning, middle, or end of the sentence.

18 G. Examples: 1. The blue one is mine; it has my initials on it. 2. A spider is not an insect; it is an arachnid. III. Complex Sentence A. A complex sentence has one independent clause and one or more dependent clauses. B. The dependent clause can be at the beginning, middle, or end of the sentence. 1. Before Amy planted the garden, she made a sketch of the layout.

19 G. Examples: 1. The blue one is mine; it has my initials on it. 2. A spider is not an insect; it is an arachnid. III. Complex Sentence A. A complex sentence has one independent clause and one or more dependent clauses. B. The dependent clause can be at the beginning, middle, or end of the sentence. 1. Before Amy planted the garden, she made a sketch of the layout. Dependent: Before Amy planted the garden

20 G. Examples: 1. The blue one is mine; it has my initials on it. 2. A spider is not an insect; it is an arachnid. III. Complex Sentence A. A complex sentence has one independent clause and one or more dependent clauses. B. The dependent clause can be at the beginning, middle, or end of the sentence. 1. Before Amy planted the garden, she made a sketch of the layout. Dependent: Before Amy planted the garden Independent: she made a sketch of the layout.

21 2. When bees collect pollen, they pollinate the plants they visit.

22 Dependent: When bees collect pollen

23 2. When bees collect pollen, they pollinate the plants they visit. Dependent: When bees collect pollen Independent: they pollinate the plants Dependent: they visit.

24 2. When bees collect pollen, they pollinate the plants they visit. Dependent: When bees collect pollen Independent: they pollinate the plants they visit. IV. Compound-Complex Sentences A. A sentence with two or more independent clauses and at least one dependent clause is a compound-complex sentence.

25 B. Examples: 1. I picked up the branches that had fallen during the storm, and Rosa mowed the grass.

26 B. Examples: 1. I picked up the branches that had fallen during the storm, and Rosa mowed the grass. Independent: I picked up the branches

27 B. Examples: 1. I picked up the branches that had fallen during the storm, and Rosa mowed the grass. Independent: I picked up the branches Dependent: that had fallen during the storm

28 B. Examples: 1. I picked up the branches that had fallen during the storm, and Rosa mowed the grass. Independent: I picked up the branches Dependent: that had fallen during the storm Independent: Rosa mowed the grass Connecting:, and

29 Practice! Identify each of the sentences as simple, complex, compound, or compound-complex. 1.Cuba’s capitol is Havana, and this beautiful city has been the center of Cuban culture since The heavy branches of the oak tree hung over our table and shaded us from the sun. 3.Because opinions are still divided, further discussion is needed. 4.The clock’s minute hand stopped working, but the second hand still moves. 5.Seashells filled her suitcase and spilled onto the floor.

30 Practice! Identify each of the sentences as independent, complex, compound, or compound- complex. 1.Cuba’s capitol is Havana, and this beautiful city has been the center of Cuban culture since (Compound) 2.The heavy branches of the oak tree hung over our table and shaded us from the sun. 3.Because opinions are still divided, further discussion is needed. 4.The clock’s minute hand stopped working, but the second hand still moves. 5.Seashells filled her suitcase and spilled onto the floor.

31 Practice! Identify each of the sentences as independent, complex, compound, or compound- complex. 1.Cuba’s capitol is Havana, and this beautiful city has been the center of Cuban culture since The heavy branches of the oak tree hung over our table and shaded us from the sun. (Simple) 3.Because opinions are still divided, further discussion is needed. 4.The clock’s minute hand stopped working, but the second hand still moves. 5.Seashells filled her suitcase and spilled onto the floor.

32 Practice! Identify each of the sentences as independent, complex, compound, or compound- complex. 1.Cuba’s capitol is Havana, and this beautiful city has been the center of Cuban culture since The heavy branches of the oak tree hung over our table and shaded us from the sun. 3.Because opinions are still divided, further discussion is needed. (Complex) 4.The clock’s minute hand stopped working, but the second hand still moves. 5.Seashells filled her suitcase and spilled onto the floor.

33 Practice! Identify each of the sentences as independent, complex, compound, or compound- complex. 1.Cuba’s capitol is Havana, and this beautiful city has been the center of Cuban culture since The heavy branches of the oak tree hung over our table and shaded us from the sun. 3.Because opinions are still divided, further discussion is needed. 4.The clock’s minute hand stopped working, but the second hand still moves. (Compound) 5.Seashells filled her suitcase and spilled onto the floor.

34 Practice! Identify each of the sentences as independent, complex, compound, or compound- complex. 1.Cuba’s capitol is Havana, and this beautiful city has been the center of Cuban culture since The heavy branches of the oak tree hung over our table and shaded us from the sun. 3.Because opinions are still divided, further discussion is needed. 4.The clock’s minute hand stopped working, but the second hand still moves. 5.Seashells filled her suitcase and spilled onto the floor. (Simple)


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