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DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION AND THE COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS Jacque Melin – GVSU Jacque Melin – GVSU www.formativedifferentiated.com.

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Presentation on theme: "DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION AND THE COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS Jacque Melin – GVSU Jacque Melin – GVSU www.formativedifferentiated.com."— Presentation transcript:

1 DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION AND THE COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS Jacque Melin – GVSU Jacque Melin – GVSU

2 1. How will the Common Core State Standards change curriculum, instruction and assessment practices? Essential Question #1

3 Film Clip Today and Tomorrow

4 The Three Musketeers

5 Partner A Talk about the schools of Today! Partner B Predict about schools of Tomorrow! Partner C Relate film message to CCSS!

6 Curriculum  What is taught  Textbooks covered, worksheets completed  Academic context  Textbook as resource  Individual subjects  Basics emphasized for all; thinking skills emphasized for gifted.  What is learned  Identify what students should know and be able to do  Life context  Multiple resources  Integrated subjects  Basics and thinking skills emphasized for all. YesterdayToday

7 Instruction  Teacher centered  Organized around time  Single teaching strategy  Teach once  Fixed groups  Whole group instruction  Passive learning  Learner centered  Organized for results  Multiple teaching strategies  Reteaching and enrichment  Flexible groups  Differentiated instruction  Active learning YesterdayToday

8 Assessment  Bell curve  One opportunity  After instruction  Paper and pencil based  Grades averaged  Proving and accountability  Focus  Precise and public criteria  Multiple opportunities  Integrated with instruction  Performance based  Grades on final performance  Diagnose and prescribe  Focus and product and performance YesterdayToday

9 “Common Core State Standards are not intended to be new names for old ways of doing business. They are a call to take the next step. “ Excerpt from Common Core State Standards Document

10 My Confidence with teaching and assessing the Common Core State Standards is…(1-4 high) Poll Everywhere

11 Don’t forget: You can copy- paste this slide into other presentations, and move or resize the poll.

12 2. Does the Common Core call for attention to student differences? 3. What are some ways differentiation supports the instructional shifts of the Common Core? Essential Questions #2 and #3

13 13 THE DI DECISION-MAKING PROCESS What are some possible CRITICAL DIFFERENCES in my students? Interests Background knowledge Learning profiles Expression styles Culture Race Gender English Language Learners Motivation Gifted/Talented or advanced At Risk (At Promise) Resistant & reluctant Struggling Students with LD, ADHD, Autism Spectrum, etc.

14 14 THE COMMON SENSE DI DECISION-MAKING PROCESS CONTENT INTRODUCTION PREASSESSMENT FORMATIVE TEACHING STRATEGIES LEARNING ACTIVITES MANAGEMENT OF FLEXIBLE, SMALL GROUPS CHOICE or ALTERNATIVES Adjusting the Breadth TIERING Adjusting the Depth What are the CRITICAL DIFFERENCES in my students? How can I ADJUST one or more of 10 curriculum components to address difference? POST ASSESSMENT: Impact of DI

15 THE DECISION-MAKING PROCESS How can I ADJUST one or more of10 curriculum components to address at least ONE targeted learning difference? ProcessProductContent CONTENT ASSESSMENTS GROUPINGINRODUCTION TEACHNG Strategies LEARNING Activities RESOURCES EXTENSIONS PRODUCTS MODIFICATONS Environment

16 Curriculum Components Content Assessment Grouping Introduction Teaching Strategies Learning Activities Resources Extensions Modifications Products Tomlinson, C.A., Kaplan, S. N., Renzulli, J. S., Purcell, J. H., Leppien, J. H., Burns, D. E., Strickland, C. A., Imbeau, M. B., (2009). The Parallel Curriculum Model. (2 nd ed.).Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

17 HUGE – LIKE AN ELEPHANT

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19 Common Core and Differentiated Instruction Name: Date: Fogarty & Pete, 2011

20 Content

21 Deconstructing Standards - Standard/Benchmark Knowledge Reasoning Skill Product Standard/Benchmark: __________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ Type:  Knowledge  Reasoning  Skill  Product Learning Targets – Teacher Friendly Language What are the knowledge, reasoning, skill or product targets underpinning the standard or benchmark? Knowledge TargetsReasoning TargetsSkill TargetsProduct Targets                         “I Can” / Learning Targets – Student Friendly Language What are the knowledge, reasoning, skill or product targets underpinning the standard or benchmark? Knowledge TargetsReasoning TargetsSkill TargetsProduct Targets                        

22 Also: Turn on Your Brain – for ELA 9 and 10 /common-core-i-can-statements/ Kentucky Website

23 Writing student friendly targets “I can…” statements for what we want students to KNOW and DO?  Statements of intended learning.  Statements that describe how we will know that we have learned it.  Should be posted or written, not just shared verbally.

24 I can relate the concept of money to real-world situations. I can make decisions about when to use appropriate types of bills and coins. I can explain why we need to use money. I can solve subtraction story problems about bills and coin money. I can count coins of different values up to and above $1.00. I can match sets of coins that have the same value. I can write the amount of money using the cent symbol. I can tell the value of each coin. I can tell the value of a group of same coins. I can solve addition story problems about bills and coin money. I can compare coin money using the words, “more than, less than, and equal to.” I can name each coin. I can write the amount of money using the dollar sign and decimal point. Please color in the coin for each target when you think you have mastered this target. Name:______________________________________

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28 What are learning targets?

29 Content Assessment

30 YOU DON’T NEED TO REINVENT THE WHEEL, BUT YOU DO NEED TO KICK THE TIRES.

31 Why ASSESS? 31 OF INSTRUCTION FOR INSTRUCTION AS INSTRUCTION SUMMATIVEPREASSESMENT FORMATIVE

32 Developing an Assessment PlanAssessment Plan 1. Determine the standards for the unit you will be teaching. 2. Deconstruct the standards as needed. 3. Write the learning targets into the plan. 4. Determine which assessment method will be used to assess the targets. 5. Develop assessment based on plan. Stiggins, 2006

33 Links Among Achievement Targets and Assessment Methods Selected Response Extended Written Response Performance Task Assessment Personal Communication KnowledgeGood Not so good – too time consuming OK – but time consuming ReasoningGood (some reasoning) Good SkillsNot good GoodGood (oral communication) ProductsNot goodGood (when written product) GoodNot good.

34 Keys to Quality  Clear Purpose  Clear Targets  Sound Design  Good Communication  Student Involvement

35 Have students indicate if they are sure or unsure for each question Note that capital letters should be used for the distracters.

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38 Include a Student Analysis Piece

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40 Correctives

41 Enrichment

42 (continued)

43 Correctives

44

45 Enrichment

46 Correctives

47

48 Enrichment

49 Content Assessments Complexity – Modifications & Extensions Concrete to Abstract Do/View/Construe Resources Grouping

50 50 Readiness in Mathematics Concrete DO Representational VIEW Abstract CONSTRUE Gravitate to hands-on materials or manipulatives Experience difficulty explaining their mathematical thinking Draw pictures to represent mathematical thinking Make models Talk about mathematical thinking in words Are able to relate the mathematical concept to real-life experiences “See” concepts abstractly Explain readily their mathematical thinking See and articulate relationships among mathematical processes Make connections readily between mathematical concepts and prior experiences Express mathematical concepts in multiple ways

51 DO – Manipulatives: Concrete Versa Tiles Didax Geofix (nets) Models of shapes (surface area and volume) Virtual Manipulatives

52 VIEW – Graphic Organizers - Representational

53 Content Assessments Complexity – Modifications & Extensions Concrete to Abstract Do/View/Construe Resources Print/Non-Print/Digital Grouping

54 Content Assessments Complexity – Modifications & Extensions Concrete to Abstract Do/View/Construe Resources Print/Non-Print/Digital Grouping TAPS

55 55 Which of these grouping formats is used for 80-95% of all teaching and learning activities? What should the percentage be? Why?

56 56 The Classroom Observation Study “Across five subject areas and 92 observation days, observed students experienced no instructional or curriculum differentiation in 84% of their instructional activities.” NRC G/T Westberg, 1993, 2003

57 57 Cooperative Groups - Varied roles -Heterogeneous ability - Interactive -Similar tasks Ability Groups -Tend to be fixed -Based on prior achievement -Homogeneous by achievement -Can effect a student’s expectations Flexible, Small Groups (FSGs) -Flexible membership -Based on a variety of factors - Student-led -Promote ownership, leadership -Understanding enhances self- esteem

58 58 FLEXIBLE, SMALL GROUPS: AN OPERATIONAL DEFINITION Within class groupings in which: Membership varies according to purpose, learning goals, topics, learning activities, resources, or products Group longevity varies Group size varies (2-10)

59 Content Assessments Complexity Concrete to Abstract Do/View/Construe Resources Print/Non-Print/Digital Grouping TAPS Dial Ideas to take away 1 Affirmation of my work 1 Call to action for transfer

60 Process

61 Teaching Strategies Introduction Learning Activities

62 Process Teaching Strategies Direct Instruction Introduction Hook them Curiosity NoveltyNovelty Drill and Recitation Concept Attainment Socratic Questioning Simulation Inquiry Based Instruction/Learning Project Based Learning PBL pblPBLpbl Independent Study Learning Activities & Products

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64 Resources for PBL Questgarden The Buck Institute West Virginia Department of Ed.

65 Process Teaching Strategies Direct Instruction Introduction Hook them Curiosity NoveltyNovelty Drill and Recitation Concept Attainment Socratic Questioning Simulation Inquiry Based Instruction/Learning Project Based Learning PBLPBL Independent Study Learning Activities & Products

66 Multiple Intelligence Assignment  Meal/banquet picture Verbal Intelligence Visual Intelligence Musical Intelligence Kinesthetic Intelligence Write a story about your planet Make a chart that compares your planet to Earth Make up a song about your planet Make up or adapt a game about your planet (e.g., Saturn ring-toss) Twinky DI

67 Levels CDCDABABCDCDABAB Bloom’s Application S. Gendron, Kentwood presentation, March 2011

68 Knowledge Taxonomy Knowledge Taxonomy 1.Awareness 2.Comprehension 3.Application 4.Analysis 5.Synthesis 6.Evaluation S. Gendron, Kentwood presentation, March 2011

69 Application Model 1. Knowledge in one discipline 2. Application within discipline 3. Application across disciplines 4. Application to real-world predictable situations 5. Application to real-world unpredictable situations S. Gendron, Kentwood presentation, March 2011

70 Levels CDCDABABCDCDABAB Bloom’s Application S. Gendron, Kentwood presentation, March 2011

71  International Center for Leadership in Education Verb list by Rigor/Relevance Quadrant Calculatematch Choosememorize Countname Definerecall Describerecite Findrecord Identifyselect Labelspell Listlocate Analyze differentiate Categorizediscriminate Classifyevaluate Compare examine Concludeexplain Contrastinfer Defendjudge Diagramjustify prove Adaptjustify Arguemodify Composepredict Concludeprioritize Constructpropose Designrate Evaluaterecommend Formulaterevise Inventteach Adjustinterpret Applyinterview Buildmake Calculatemodel Constructplay Demonstrateproduce Dramatizerelate Drawsequence Illustratesolve

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73 Explicit Teaching Common Core Standards

74 Detour... A temporary inconvenience for permanent improvement

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76 Motivational Mind Set: Through Emotions get their Attention Skill Description: What Standard Requires Menu of Operations: “How-to” Steps for Students Instructional Strategy: “Process as Content” Assessment: Judgment of Product or Performance Reflection: Student Comment on Process TAG / Synonyms Account for Similarities Look for Differences Inspect for Hidden Similarities / Differences Know names of groupings Express result of Compare/Contrast A - L - I - K - E - T-Chart Alternating Sentences Dual Paragraphs Taste Test: Which Candy Bar? Students compare something In your subject area. Which is easier – compare or contrast?

77 Target Thinking Skill Template: Compare and Contrast # 3 Menu of Operations ALIKEALIKE Account for similarities Look for differences Inspect for hidden Similarities/Differences Know name of groupings Express results of Compare/Contrast

78 Motivational Mind Set: Through Emotions get their Attention Skill Description: What Standard Requires Menu of Operations: “How-to” Steps for Students Instructional Strategy: “Process as Content” Assessment: Judgment of Product or Performance Reflection: Student Comment on Process TAG / Synonyms Account for Similarities Look for Differences Inspect for Hidden Similarities / Differences Know names of groupings Express result of Compare/Contrast A - L - I - K - E - T-Chart Alternating Sentences Dual Paragraphs Taste Test: Which Candy Bar? Students compare something In your subject area. Which is easier – compare or contrast?

79 “Compare and Contrast” Alternating Pattern: Alternating sentences AB AB Dual Paragraphs Pattern: Para 1 Write about AAAA Para 2 Then write about BBBB How Alike and Different

80 A)Salt is savory, B)while pepper is spicy. A) yet, the salt is not that healthy, B)while pepper seems more benign. And, finally, A) salt is invisible on the food, B) while pepper is visibly “peppered” on the food. Yet, both are spices and both can be added at any point in the cooking. Alternating Sentences Target Thinking Skill Template: Compare and Contrast # 4 Instructional Strategy

81 AAA - Salt is a savory condiment that many people add to their plated food, yet is a habit that is not healthy. Usually salt has already been included in the preparation. And it is invisible so people may add too much. However salt is a spice like pepper. BBB - On the other hand, pepper is spicy flavoring people use to give their food a “bite”. Unlike salt it is healthy to eat and it is visibly obvious how much pepper they are using. But it’s still a spice. Dual Paragraphs Target Thinking Skill Template: Compare and Contrast # 4 Instructional Strategy

82 Process Teaching Strategies Direct Instruction Introduction Hook them Curiosity NoveltyNovelty Drill and Recitation Concept Attainment Socratic Questioning Simulation Inquiry Based Instruction/Learning Project Based Learning PBLPBL Independent Study Learning Activities & Products

83 Jeopardy Game Write Jeopardy questions that can be used to review the events leading up to the Revolutionary War. Write 20 questions with answers. Use an index card for each question, with the answer on the back. Position Piece Write a position piece that explains what America would be like if we lost the war to the British. Make sure to include who would be the leader and what the rules would be like. Discuss the similarities or differences you would see from America today. Collage Make a collage showing how the colonists rebelled against the British. Include 8-12 pictures that represent the colonists’ views and actions. Multi-Media Make a five minute multi- media presentation showing the causes and effects of the Acts leading up to the Revolutionary War. Make sure to include pictures. Song/Rap/Poem Write a song, rap, or poem about a group involved in the Revolutionary War. Be sure to include their role and position they take on the war. Your work may be either read or performed for the class. Timeline Create a timeline that shows the events leading up to the war. Make sure to include 10 or more we have discussed in class. Play Write a play about one event that leads up to the war. Make sure to include at least 3 key people. You may act it out to the class. Poster Create a poster that may have been used as propaganda to persuade colonists to choose a side in the war. Letter Write a letter to a friend that persuades a friend during the Revolutionary era to take a side either the British or the Patriots. Explain the advantages of your side and the disadvantages of the opposing view. Tic-Tac-Toe Choice Board 5 th Grade – Road to Revolution Directions: Chose activities in a tic-tac-toe design. When you have completed the activities in a row — horizontally, vertically, or diagonally you made decide to be finished. Or you may decide to keep going and complete more activities. Star the activities you plan to complete. Color in the box when you finish the activity.

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85 Map Reading, Grade 3  Know:  Parts of a map, map symbols, different types of maps  Understand:  That there are many more types of maps that we imagine  Depending upon one’s occupation, one is more likely to use some types of maps more than other types  That we use maps for different purposes Do: Strand 2.1 Access and gather information from a variety of primary and secondary sources. GLE Answer questions about content gathered from print and non-print sources. Strand 2.2 Interpret information from a variety of primary and secondary sources GLE Compare and summarize information from political and physical maps by using map symbols. Compare and summarize information from charts and graphs.

86 86 Map Reading Skills ROLEAUDIENCEFORMATTOPIC TouristFriend, TeacherPost CardHow far I travelled from CT to DC CartographerAssistant Design a Map of Hartford National Park Service HikersElevation Map of Hiking Trails Tri-Fold Map of Local Trails Planning Board Mayor or City Council Member Speech, Presentation “Best Location for a Recreation Center and Pool Complex” MeteorologistCompany CEOPowerPoint with Local and Regional Maps “Making the Case for Locating Farms That Will Produce High-Yield Crops”

87 87 Map Reading Skills ROLEAUDIENCEFORMATTOPIC TouristFriend, TeacherPost CardHow far I travelled from CT to DC CartographerAssistant Design a Map of Hartford National Park Service HikersElevation Map of Hiking Trails Tri-Fold Map of Local Trails Planning Board Mayor or City Council Member Speech, Presentation “Best Location for a Recreation Center and Pool Complex” MeteorologistCompany CEOPowerPoint with Local and Regional Maps “Making the Case for Locating Farms That Will Produce High-Yield Crops”

88 Story Response: Choice Board (Triarchic Intelligences) TARGET: I can describe the theme or message that a writer or author wants to communicate.

89 Analytic Listen to or read a story and create a chart that tells events in the story and how they contribute to the theme of the story. Practical Think of a time you or someone you know was in a situation similar to the main character in the story. Draw and/or write about it and include the theme or message that was similar to the story. Creative Imagine that the story continues after the last page. Use Prezi or PowerPoint or act out the next scene. This scene should relate to the theme or message of the story.

90 Task: Construct a food web with the owl at the highest trophic level. Be sure to include producers (green plants) and decomposers in your food web. Also include the Sun. The intermediate organisms should include the prey found in the owl pellets that you dissected in class. Label the role of all organisms and use arrows to show the energy flow between each organism. Finally, explain the flow of energy in the food web.

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92 Basic. What are the 6 steps of the experimental design process?. Explain the difference between an independent and dependent variable. 3. Write a hypothesis from this question: Does listening to music cause chickens to lay more eggs?. Using If…, And… Then…, write a prediction statement for the following hypothesis: Listening to music causes chickens to lay more eggs 5. Make a double T chart that would compare an experiment where music is played for one group of chickens and not for another to see if music affects the number of eggs they lay. Label each variable. 6. Make a graph using the following information. Label which axis is the independent and dependent variable. Not playing music—5 chickens lay 17 eggs. Playing music—5 chickens lay 25 eggs.. What are the 6 steps of the experimental design process?. Explain the difference between an independent and dependent variable. 3. Write a hypothesis from this question: Does listening to music cause chickens to lay more eggs?. Using If…, And… Then…, write a prediction statement for the following hypothesis: Listening to music causes chickens to lay more eggs 5. Make a double T chart that would compare an experiment where music is played for one group of chickens and not for another to see if music affects the number of eggs they lay. Label each variable. 6. Make a graph using the following information. Label which axis is the independent and dependent variable. Not playing music—5 chickens lay 17 eggs. Playing music—5 chickens lay 25 eggs.

93 Curriculum Components Content Assessment Grouping Introduction Teaching Strategies Learning Activities Resources Extensions Modifications Products Tomlinson, C.A., Kaplan, S. N., Renzulli, J. S., Purcell, J. H., Leppien, J. H., Burns, D. E., Strickland, C. A., Imbeau, M. B., (2009). The Parallel Curriculum Model. (2 nd ed.).Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

94 An Old African Proverb Asks: How do you eat an elephant?????

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