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Reading Strategies for Science. There’s No Substitute for the Real Thing! This exercise illustrates the importance of first hand experience in building.

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Presentation on theme: "Reading Strategies for Science. There’s No Substitute for the Real Thing! This exercise illustrates the importance of first hand experience in building."— Presentation transcript:

1 Reading Strategies for Science

2 There’s No Substitute for the Real Thing! This exercise illustrates the importance of first hand experience in building academic vocabulary for science 1.Groups each receive an orange 2.Each group records what they observe about the orange using their five senses 3.Each group reports out the number they generated in four minutes Procedure:

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5 Vocabulary knowledge means having an awareness of words and word meanings. Vocabulary knowledge is more complicated than reciting key terms and their definitions. Vocabulary Knowledge

6 Content vocabulary words are used within the subject matter you are teaching (e.g. photosynthesis, plate tectonics). Academic vocabulary is the higher-level language needed to understand the content (e.g., analyze, identify).

7 Frayer Model  Helpful for distinguishing a concept from others that students may know or may be learning  Included in model are:  Definition  Characteristics  Examples  Non-examples  Useful for concepts that students may already know but cannot readily define Vocabulary Strategies

8 Shower Cards Allow students to create a “Shower Card” Use laminating film or transparency sheets cut into various sizes. Students write down vocabulary terms, diagrams, or general study information using a permanent marker. Take them home and study while in the shower.

9 Coding the Text Self-monitoring during reading is essential for students. Codes: ? – I am confused/I don’t understand M- I want to learn more about this *- This is important N- New information C- Connection AHA- Big idea of the text Source: Reading Strategies for Science p. 135

10 ¾ Fold Book Summary Cover – Recreate the Cover of the book Inside Cover – Comprehension Questions Flap 1 – Student selected vocabulary Flap 2 – ELA or Math Connection to the book Flap 3 – Summary of the book Back – Extension or Extra Credit

11 Talking Drawings p. 169 Activating students’ prior knowledge and generate interest How it works: Have students close their eyes and form a mental picture on the topic selected. Have them illustrate what they see and share with a partner. Encourage questions… Meet as a whole group and gather all of the information that was generated…

12 Next, have the students read the selection with their pictures in mind. After reading, ask them to create an additional drawing to show what they have learned. Last, have the students discuss their pictures with their partners and ask questions. Make sure that they explain how the two illustrations are different.

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15 Concept of Definition p. 50 Graphic Organizer to teach essential vocabulary How it works… – Prior to reading, choose a word that is essential. – Guide students by asking the following questions What is it? What are some things you know about it? What is it like? What is an example of it? – Encourage students to read the text and add information to their maps.

16 Concept of Definition Map Source: Reading Strategies in Science p. 50 Write term on the board and at the center of the map. Guide students by asking the following questions. What is it? What are some things you know about it? What’s it like? What’s an example of it?

17 List, Group, Label Source: Reading Strategies in Science p. 80 Strategy to Assess and Build on Prior Knowledge Students are presented with list of words centered around topic of study Students classify/sort words into categories they determine It’s OK to have “leftover” words; or to use a word as a category itself Strategy to Assess and Build on Prior Knowledge Students are presented with list of words centered around topic of study Students classify/sort words into categories they determine It’s OK to have “leftover” words; or to use a word as a category itself

18 Choose a vocabulary word you are currently studying. Write your own definition. Create an icon for it and an action. Extra points for using the word and/or related words in a song, rap, poem, cheer, or chant. Iconic Vocabulary

19 Rank-Order Retell p.149 Students need to learn how to evaluate the information in a science selection to determine the most important ideas, moderately important ideas, and the least important ideas to summarize effectively what they have read. How it works Students are given strips of paper to write down important information as they read. Once they finish reading they sort the strips into three categories: most important, moderately important, and least important.

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21 Rank-Order Retell p.149 Most important ideas: Moderately important ideas: Least important ideas:

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23 “If we teach today’s students as we taught yesterday’s, we rob them of tomorrow.” Closing Thought —John Dewey

24 Sally Creel


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