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McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2013 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 6 Internal Control, Cash, and Merchandise Sales PowerPoint.

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Presentation on theme: "McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2013 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 6 Internal Control, Cash, and Merchandise Sales PowerPoint."— Presentation transcript:

1 McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2013 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 6 Internal Control, Cash, and Merchandise Sales PowerPoint Authors: Brandy Mackintosh Lindsay Heiser

2 6-2 Learning Objective 6-1 Distinguish among service, merchandising, and manufacturing operations.

3 6-3 Operating Cycles

4 6-4 Operating Cycles Sell Products Collect Cash Incur Operating Expenses Buy Raw Materials Make Products Manufacturing Company

5 6-5 Learning Objective 6-2 Explain common principles and limitations of internal control.

6 6-6 Internal Control Internal control is important to all types and sizes of organizations, especially after the business failures and accounting scandals involving Enron and other companies in the early 2000s. The Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) Act requires all public companies to assess the effectiveness of internal controls over financial reporting. Effective internal controls play an essential role in creating an ethical business environment, improving financial performance, and preventing fraud. All companies include as part of their operating activities a variety of procedures and policies that are referred to as internal controls.

7 6-7 Common Control Principles

8 6-8 Control Limitations Internal controls can never completely prevent and detect errors and fraud. Benefits vs. Cost Human Error or Fraud

9 6-9 Learning Objective 6-3 Apply internal control principles to cash receipts and payments.

10 6-10 Controlling and Reporting Cash Internal control of cash is important to any organization. Volume of cash is enormous. Cash is valuable and “owned” by person possessing it.

11 6-11 Cash Received in Person Segregate Duties Cashier Custody Recording

12 6-12 Cash Received in Person

13 6-13 Cash Received from a Remote Source Cash Received by Mail Cash Received Electronically

14 6-14 Cash Payments Writing a Check Electronic Funds Transfer A voucher system is a process for approving and documenting all purchases and payments on account. Most companies pay cash to their employees through EFTs, which are known by employees as direct deposits.

15 6-15 Learning Objective 6-4 Perform the key control of reconciling cash to bank statements.

16 6-16 Bank Procedures and Reconciliation Banks provide services that help businesses to control cash in several ways: Restricting Access Documenting Procedures Independently Verifying A bank reconciliation is an internal report prepared to verify the accuracy of both the bank statement and the cash accounts of a business or individual.

17 6-17 Bank Statement

18 6-18 Reconciling Differences

19 6-19 Bank Reconciliation To determine the appropriate cash balance, these balances need to be reconciled.

20 6-20 Bank Reconciliation Bank Reconciliation Goals 1.Identify the deposits in transit. 2.Identify the outstanding checks. 3.Record other transactions on the bank statement. 4.Determine the impact of errors.

21 6-21 Bank Reconciliation

22 6-22 Reporting Cash and Cash Equivalents Cash includes money or any instrument that banks will accept for deposit and immediate credit to a company’s account, such as a check, money order, or bank draft. Cash equivalents are short-term, highly liquid investments purchased within three months of maturity.

23 6-23 Learning Objective 6-5 Explain the use of a perpetual inventory system as a control.

24 6-24 Controlling and Reporting Merchandise Sales Inventory Quantities Inventory Costs Financial Statements Unsold Inventory Balance Sheet Sold Inventory Income Statement

25 6-25 Perpetual Inventory System In a perpetual inventory system, the inventory records are updated “perpetually,” that is, every time inventory is bought, sold, or returned. Perpetual systems often are combined with bar codes and optical scanners.

26 6-26 Periodic Inventory System In a periodic inventory system, the inventory records are updated “periodically,” that is, at the end of the accounting period. To determine how much merchandise has been sold, periodic systems require that inventory be physically counted at the end of the period.

27 6-27 Inventory Control Perpetual Inventory System Continuous Tracking Can Estimate Shrinkage Periodic Inventory System No Up-to-Date Records Can’t Estimate Shrinkage

28 6-28 Learning Objective 6-6 Analyze sales transactions under a perpetual inventory system.

29 6-29 Sales Transactions Merchandisers earn revenues by transferring ownership of merchandise to a customer, either for cash or on credit. For a merchandiser who is shipping goods to a customer, the transfer of ownership occurs at one of two possible times: 1. FOB shipping point —the sale is recorded when the goods leave the seller’s shipping department. 2. FOB destination —the sale is recorded when the goods reach their destination (the customer).

30 6-30 Sales Transactions Every merchandise sale has two components, each of which requires an entry in a perpetual inventory system. Selling Price Cost

31 6-31 Sales Transactions Assume Wal-Mart sells two Schwinn mountain bikes for $400 cash. The bikes had previously been recorded in Wal-Mart’s Inventory at a total cost of $ Analyze Liabilities Assets = Stockholders’ Equity + Cash +$400 Inventory -$350 Sales Revenue (+R) +$400 Cost of Goods Sold (+E) -$350 2 Record dr Cash (+A) cr Sales Revenue (+R, +SE) dr Cost of Goods Sold (+E, -SE) cr Inventory (-A)

32 6-32 Sales Returns and Allowances When goods sold to a customer arrive in damaged condition or are otherwise unsatisfactory, the customer can (1) return them for a full refund or (2) keep them and ask for a reduction in the selling price, called an allowance.

33 6-33 Sales Returns and Allowances Suppose that after Wal-Mart sold the two Schwinn mountain bikes, the customer returned one to Wal-Mart. Assuming that the bike is still like new, Wal-Mart would refund the $200 selling price to the customer and take the bike back into inventory. 1 Analyze Liabilities Assets = Stockholders’ Equity + Cash -$200 Inventory +$175 Sales Returns and Allowances (+xR) -$200 Cost of Goods Sold (-E) +$175 2 Record dr Sales Returns & Allowances (+xR, -SE) cr Cash (-A) dr Inventory (+A) cr Cost of Goods Sold (-E, +SE)

34 6-34 Sales on Account and Sales Discounts A sales discount is a sales price reduction given to customers for prompt payment of their account balance.

35 6-35 Sales on Account and Sales Discounts Suppose Wal-Mart’s warehouse store (Sam’s Club) sells printer paper on account to a local business for $1,000 with payment terms of 2/10, n/30. The paper cost Sam’s Club $ Record dr Accounts Receivable (+A) cr Sales Revenue (+R, +SE) dr Cost of Goods Sold (+E, -SE) cr Inventory (-A) 1, , Analyze Liabilities Assets = Stockholders’ Equity + Accounts Receivable+$1,000 Inventory -$700 Sales Revenue (+R) +$1,000 Cost of Goods Sold (+E) -$700

36 Record dr Cash (+A) dr Sales Discounts (+xR, -SE) cr Accounts Receivable (-A) 1, Sales on Account and Sales Discounts To take advantage of this 2% discount, the customer must pay Wal-Mart within 10 days. If the customer does so, it will deduct the $20 discount (2% $1,000) from the total owed ($1,000), and then pay $980 to Wal-Mart. (2% × $1,000) 1 Analyze Liabilities Assets = Stockholders’ Equity + Cash +$980 Accounts Receivable -$1,000 Sales Discounts (+xR) -$20

37 6-37 Summary of Sales-Related Transactions The sales returns and allowances and sales discounts introduced in this section were recorded using contra-revenue accounts.

38 6-38 Learning Objective 6-7 Analyze a merchandiser’s multistep income statement.

39 6-39 Gross Profit Percentage Gross Profit % = Gross Profit Net Sales × 100

40 6-40 Comparing Operating Results Across Companies and Industries

41 McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2013 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 6 Solved Exercises M6-10, M6-19, E6-5, E6-7, E6-10, E6-17

42 6-42 M6-10 Calculating Shrinkage in a Perpetual Inventory System Corey’s Campus Store has $4,000 of inventory on hand at the beginning of the month. During the month, the company buys $41,000 of merchandise and sells merchandise that had cost $30,000. At the end of the month, $13,000 of inventory is on hand. How much shrinkage occurred during the month? Beginning inventory Purchases Cost of Goods Sold Ending balance Inventory count Shrinkage $ 4, , ,000 15, ,000 $ 2,000

43 6-43 M6-19 Calculating the Impact of Changes in Gross Profit Percentage on Operating Income Luxottica Group, the Italian company that sells Ray Ban and Killer Loop sunglasses, reported a gross profit percentage of 66.4 percent in 2008 and 65.4 percent in In each of these two years, the company’s net sales was fairly steady at approximately 5 million euro. Assuming that Luxottica’s operating expenses were 2.6 million euro in each year, how much more (or less) income from operations did Luxottica report in 2009 than in 2008? Sales Gross profit percentage Gross Profit Operating Expenses Income from Operations Luxottica earned € 50,000 less in 2009 than €5,000,000 x ,270,000 2,600,000 € 670, €5,000,000 x ,320,000 2,600,000 € 720,000

44 6-44 E6-5 Preparing a Bank Reconciliation and Journal Entries, and Reporting Cash Hills Company’s June 30, 2013, bank statement and the June ledger account for cash are summarized here: Required: 1. Prepare a bank reconciliation. A comparison of the checks written with the checks that have cleared the bank shows outstanding checks of $700. Some of the checks that cleared in June were written prior to June. No deposits in transit were noted in May, but a deposit is in transit at the end of June.

45 6-45 HILLS COMPANY Bank Reconciliation June 30, 2013 Bank Statement Ending balance per bank statement……………….. Additions: Deposit in transit……………. Deductions: Outstanding checks………... Up-to-date cash balance…... *$19,000 - $18,000 = $1,000. $ 6,070 *1,000 7, $6,370 Company’s Books Ending balance per Cash account ……………….. Additions: None Deductions: Bank service charge...……... Up-to-date cash balance…... $ 6,400 6, $6,370 E6-5 Preparing a Bank Reconciliation and Journal Entries, and Reporting Cash

46 6-46 E6-5 Preparing a Bank Reconciliation and Journal Entries, and Reporting Cash 2.Give any journal entries that should be made as a result of the bank reconciliation. 3.What is the balance in the Cash account after the reconciliation entries? 4.In addition to the balance in its bank account, Hills Company also has $300 cash on hand. This amount is recorded in a separate T-account called Cash on Hand. What is the total amount of cash that should be reported on the balance sheet at June 30? $6,370 ($6,400 - $30) dr Office Expenses (+E, -SE) cr Cash (-A) To record bank service charges. 30 Balance sheet (June 30, 2013): Current assets: Cash ($6,370 + $300) $6,670

47 6-47 E6-7 Identifying Shrinkage and Other Missing Inventory Information Calculate the missing information for each of the following independent cases: Case ABCDABCD Beg. Inventory $ Purchases $ Cost of Goods Sold $ Ending Inventory (perpetual) Ending Inventory (As Counted) Shrinkage $ $ $ ? ? ? ? ? ? ?

48 6-48 E6-10 Recording Journal Entries for Net Sales with Credit Sales and Sales Discounts Using the information in E6-9, prepare journal entries to record the transactions, assuming Solitare uses a perpetual inventory system. Jan. 6 Sold goods for $100 to Wizard Inc. with terms 2/10, n/30. The goods cost Solitare $70. 6 Sold goods to SpyderCorp for $80 with terms 2/10, n/30. The goods cost Solitare $ Collected cash due from Wizard Inc. Feb. 2 Collected cash due from SpyderCorp. 28 Sold goods for $50 to Bridges with terms 2/10, n/45. The goods cost Solitare $30. Jan. 6 dr Accounts Receivable (+A) cr Sales Revenue (+R, +SE) dr Cost of Goods Sold (+E, -SE) cr Inventory (-A)

49 6-49 E6-10 Recording Journal Entries for Net Sales with Credit Sales and Sales Discounts Using the information in E6-9, prepare journal entries to record the transactions, assuming Solitare uses a perpetual inventory system. Jan. 6 Sold goods for $100 to Wizard Inc. with terms 2/10, n/30. The goods cost Solitare $70. 6 Sold goods to SpyderCorp for $80 with terms 2/10, n/30. The goods cost Solitare $ Collected cash due from Wizard Inc. Feb. 2 Collected cash due from SpyderCorp. 28 Sold goods for $50 to Bridges with terms 2/10, n/45. The goods cost Solitare $30. Jan. 6 dr Accounts Receivable (+A) cr Sales Revenue (+R, +SE) dr Cost of Goods Sold (+E, -SE) cr Inventory (-A)

50 6-50 E6-10 Recording Journal Entries for Net Sales with Credit Sales and Sales Discounts Using the information in E6-9, prepare journal entries to record the transactions, assuming Solitare uses a perpetual inventory system. Jan. 6 Sold goods for $100 to Wizard Inc. with terms 2/10, n/30. The goods cost Solitare $70. 6 Sold goods to SpyderCorp for $80 with terms 2/10, n/30. The goods cost Solitare $ Collected cash due from Wizard Inc. Feb. 2 Collected cash due from SpyderCorp. 28 Sold goods for $50 to Bridges with terms 2/10, n/45. The goods cost Solitare $30. Jan. 14 dr Cash (+A) ($100 x 98%) dr Sales Discounts (+xR, -SE) ($100 x 2%) cr Accounts Receivable (-A)

51 6-51 E6-10 Recording Journal Entries for Net Sales with Credit Sales and Sales Discounts Using the information in E6-9, prepare journal entries to record the transactions, assuming Solitare uses a perpetual inventory system. Jan. 6 Sold goods for $100 to Wizard Inc. with terms 2/10, n/30. The goods cost Solitare $70. 6 Sold goods to SpyderCorp for $80 with terms 2/10, n/30. The goods cost Solitare $ Collected cash due from Wizard Inc. Feb. 2 Collected cash due from SpyderCorp. 28 Sold goods for $50 to Bridges with terms 2/10, n/45. The goods cost Solitare $30. Feb. 2 dr Cash (+A) cr Accounts Receivable (-A)80

52 6-52 E6-10 Recording Journal Entries for Net Sales with Credit Sales and Sales Discounts Using the information in E6-9, prepare journal entries to record the transactions, assuming Solitare uses a perpetual inventory system. Jan. 6 Sold goods for $100 to Wizard Inc. with terms 2/10, n/30. The goods cost Solitare $70. 6 Sold goods to SpyderCorp for $80 with terms 2/10, n/30. The goods cost Solitare $ Collected cash due from Wizard Inc. Feb. 2 Collected cash due from SpyderCorp. 28 Sold goods for $50 to Bridges with terms 2/10, n/45. The goods cost Solitare $30. Feb. 28 dr Accounts Receivable (+A) cr Sales Revenue (+R, +SE) dr Cost of Goods Sold (+E, -SE) cr Inventory (-A)

53 6-53 E6-17 Inferring Missing Amounts Based on Income Statement Relationships Supply the missing dollar amounts for the income statement of Williamson Company for each of the following independent cases: Sales Revenue Sales Returns and Allowances Net Sales Cost of Goods Sold Gross Profit Case B $ 6, ,500 4,050 $ 1,450 Case A $ 8, ,850 5,750 $ 2,100 Case C $ 6, ,920 5,400 $ 520

54 6-54 End of Chapter 6


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