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WIFI Access Network: NRIC Guest Password: nriclearn 1.

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1 WIFI Access Network: NRIC Guest Password: nriclearn 1

2 The Rhode Island Alternate Assessment (RIAA) Science September, 2014 Northern Rhode Island Collaborative, Lincoln, RI

3 Agenda Welcome & Introductions Changes in the alternate assessment system RIAA Science Lunch ProFile: creating accounts, registering students, giving access to administrators Changes to graduation requirements NCSC Pilot Test PARCC overview 3

4 Changes in the Alternate Assessment Program 4 GradeNCSC Pilot Test 2RIAA ScienceNCSC Operational ELA, MathScienceELA, Math 2 not tested 3 not tested*not testedYes - Required 4 Yes (gr 3 test)Yes - Required 5 Yes (gr 4 testnot testedYes - Required 6 Yes (gr 5 test)not testedYes - Required 7 Yes (gr 6 test)not testedYes - Required 8 Yes (gr 7 test)Yes - Required 9 Yes (gr 8 test)not tested 10 not tested 11 not tested*Yes - Required 12 Yes (gr 11 test)not tested Test WindowOct. 20 – Nov. 15Sept. 29 – May 3March 30 – May 15 Teacher Training Dates October 8 and 15September 23 and 24TBD

5 Change in Standards for All Tests NECAP RIAA GLEs and AAGSEs PARCC Core Content Connectors Common Core State Standards NCSC

6 Comparing RIAA and NCSC RIAANCSC Test Type:PortfolioAdaptive Grade Levels:2-8 and and 11 Content Areas: Reading, Writing, Math, ScienceELA (incl. Writing), Math Timing:Year-longMonth-long in Spring Standards:AAGSEs: grade spansCCSS: discrete grade levels Eligibility:Remains the same Teacher time:Demanding: Develop assessment activities, write narratives. Lighter: some preparation for accommodations and materials for each item. Scoring:Teacher scores activitiesTeacher scores some CRs Results:Highly individualized content and activities (group comparisons are difficult) Standardized content (group comparisons will be easier)

7 Ways students participate in state assessments: 1.General education assessment without accommodations (PARCC/NECAP Science) 2.General education assessment with accommodations (PARCC/NECAP Science) 3.Alternate assessments (NCSC/RIAA Science) 7

8 Who takes the alternate assessment? Students with significant cognitive disabilities who meet the eligibility criteria Make up about 1% of the student population Disability impacts all domains of learning 8

9 Eligibility for the RIAA (page 5) Eligibility should have already been determined by the start of RIAA Science testing. IEP Team Guidance for Eligibility for the RIAA ▫ Guidance was reviewed by teachers and special education directors. ▫ For ALL members of the IEP Team. ▫ No ONE person should be responsible for making eligibility decisions. ▫ Guidance document was sent through the listserv. 9

10 The Structure of RIAA Science Inquiry Construct Content Standard (AAGSE) 10 “doing” science; investigation “learning” science; content Inquiry Entry Knowledge Entry

11 Alternate Assessment Grade Span Expectations in Science (AAGSEs) Developed from Grade Span Expectations in Science assessed on NECAP science Developed in cooperation with RI teachers Knowledge and skills that students should know and be able to do. 11

12 Science Inquiry Entry Structure (page 15) 12

13 13 Science Knowledge Entry Structure (page 15)

14 AAGSE Entry Components 14 Data Summary Sheet Student Documentation Form (LS)* Student Documentation Form (ESS)* Student Work (can be any collection period) Student Documentation Form (PS)* * Science domains can be assessed in any order as long as all three are covered over the course of the year.

15 How do I choose an AAGSEs to assess? (page 16) Select the inquiry construct you want to assess first. Select one AAGSE for each of the three science domains being assessed (Chapter 6 of your manual) 1.Earth and Space Science 2.Physical Science 3.Life Science Make sure you understand the content!! Make sure you have the resources and tools available to you to assess the standard appropriately. Consider student strengths, needs, and interests. 15

16 Understanding Inquiry Constructs: Page 16

17 Inquiry Constructs (page 18) 17 Assessed Inquiry Constructs by Grade Grade 1. Observing/ Questioning 2. Planning3. Conducting4. Analyzing 4 Make and describe observations in order to ask a question or make a prediction related to the science investigation. Follow procedures or use appropriate equipment or measurement devices accurately to record qualitative or quantitative data. 8 Identify information or evidence that needs to be collected or tools to be used in order to answer a question or check a prediction. Use data to summarize results. 11 Use accepted methods of organizing, representing, or manipulating data. Use evidence to support and/or justify interpretations or conclusions or explain how the evidence refutes their prediction or hypothesis.

18 Step 1: Observing/Questioning (page 16) Make and describe observations in order to ask a question or make a prediction related to the science investigation. Students learn more about the subject: Watch (observe) animals, the sun, the stars, ice to water which turns to steam,…plants grow, documentaries, movies, etc.… Read books, articles, etc… 18

19 Step 2: Planning (page 16) Identify information or evidence that needs to be collected or tools to be used in order to answer a question or check a prediction. Tools to be used ▫ tangible items Information to be collected ▫ sources of information, times, frequency of data collection ▫ What they will collect ▫ number of something, temperature, people with a certain trait, etc. 19

20 Step 3: Conducting (page 17) 20 Grade 4: Follow procedures or use appropriate equipment or measurement devices accurately to record qualitative or quantitative data. 1.Procedures: How the student collected data 2.Equipment/measurement devices: How and what the student recorded the data on their datasheet 3.Others? Grade 8: Use data to summarize results. 1.Numerical (quantitative data) 2.Observational (non-numerical data) Grade 11: Use accepted methods of organizing, representing, or manipulating data. 1.Organizing: uses data sheets, groupings of observations. 2.Representing/manipulating: tables, graphs, pictures, etc.

21 Step 4: Analyzing (page 17) Use evidence to support and/or justify interpretations or conclusions or explain how the evidence refutes the hypothesis. Involves looking at the data and making decisions. Uses data to respond to the investigation question. Analyzing is not recording data on the data sheet. Analyzing is not answering questions about the data. ▫ How many people in class have dogs? 21

22 Applying what you’ve learned 22

23 Answers 1.Correct answer is B. 2.Correct answer is A. 3.Correct answer is A. 4.What did you decide? 23

24 How to write up the Inquiry Entry Describe the inquiry construct clearly. Convey how the student was assessed. Ensure that description clearly shows how the data was collected.

25 Student Documentation Form (SDF): (page 30) One SDF for each collection period (3 total) Collection Period 1: Life Science Collection Period 2: Physical Science Collection Period 3: Earth Space Science Reflects how the student demonstrates his/her knowledge and is assessed on the Inquiry Construct 25

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27 1: Describing the Science Investigation Whole-class description Clear and concise description of each of the four components of the investigation. This section should be the same for both Inquiry and Knowledge entries (i.e., cut-and-paste). 27

28 2: What did the student do his/herself during the investigation? Describe, using specific examples, how the individual student demonstrated his or her inquiry construct skills during the investigation.  Description of what the student did  Clear and concise 28

29 3 & 4: Evaluate the student’s Accuracy and Independence Accuracy: Clear description of the student’s correct and incorrect answers related to the Inquiry Construct. Independence: Clear description of the assistance provided to the student for each answer related to the Inquiry Construct. 29

30 How to write up the Knowledge Entry Describe the AAGSE activity clearly. Convey how the student was assessed. Ensure that the description clearly shows how the data was collected.

31 Knowledge Entry Three Science Domains 1.Life Science (LS) 2.Physical Science (PS) 3.Earth and Space Science (ESS) 31

32

33 1: Describing the Science Investigation Whole-class description Clear and concise description of each of the four components of the investigation. This section should be the same for both Inquiry and Knowledge entries (i.e., cut-and-paste). 33

34 2: What did the student do him/herself during the investigation? 34 Describe, using specific examples, how the individual student demonstrated the AAGSE during the investigation.  Description of what the student did  Clear and concise

35 3 & 4: Evaluate the student’s Accuracy and Independence Accuracy: Clear description of the student’s correct and incorrect answers related to the AAGSE. Independence: Clear description of the assistance provided to the student for each answer related to the AAGSE. 35

36 Select an Inquiry Construct Choose an AAGSE and plan an investigation 36.

37 Select at least one of the AAGSEs below (or from the list in the back of your manual) and outline an investigation using the worksheet. 37 ESS 1.1.3: Compare different soils to each other using their physical properties ESS 2.1.1: Identify the major effects the sun has on the earth. LS 1.1.1: Distinguish between living and non-living things. PS 1.1.1: Distinguish the physical properties of matter. PS 1.3.1: Demonstrate an understanding of mass.

38 How to Complete the Data Summary Sheet (DSS)

39 Data Summary Sheet Includes: Data over the year in the following categories:  Level of Accuracy  Level of Independence  Levels of Assistance Data points  Three data points in each collection period  Each data point is from a different day ▫ One data point is a narrative written on the Student Documentation Form (SDF). 39

40 40 Least to Most Assistance

41 Accuracy, Assistance, and Independence

42 Level of Accuracy Example: # of times the skill is correct #of times the skill is attempted “James was given 2 opportunities to show that the data he collected showed that living things breathe. He was correct 1 out of 2 times for an accuracy rate of 50%.” 1/2 = 50% 42

43 Level of Independence Example: “The student performed [the skill; what is being measured] independently 1 out of 5 opportunities.” 1 out of 5 independently 1/5 = 20% 43

44 Levels of Assistance Are prompt hierarchies/instructional prompts Facilitates the completion of a task Individualized for each student Fade and/or modify as a student progresses toward independence 44

45 Examples of Levels of Assistance Gestural Prompt (GP)Prompts of a nonverbal nature that help students respond and provides them with cues related to the content of the activity. Verbal Prompt (VP)Spoken statements that help students respond and provides them with cues related to the content of the activity. Model (M)Requires the teacher to demonstrate a desired behavior in order to prompt an imitative response. Partial Physical Prompt (PPP) Physically guides the students through the target skill/task, but at a less intrusive level (hand-over-wrist, elbow, shoulder) Full Physical Prompt (FPP) Requires the teacher to place his/her hand on top of student's hand and physically guide the student through the target behavior/task (hand-over-hand). The teacher, rather than the student, exerts the effort, which minimizes errors.

46 Entering the Level of Assistance 46 Choose three prompts for each student and arrange them from least invasive to most when you enter them into ProFile. 1.Verbal prompt (VP) 2.Wrist prompt (PPP) 3.HOH prompt (FPP)

47 Connection between Levels of Independence and Assistance 1 out of 5 opportunities independent 1/5 = 20% 0 out of 5 with verbal prompts0/5 = 0% 2 out of 5 with partial physical prompts 2/5 = 40% 2 out of 5 with full physical prompts2/5 = 40% 100%* *Must add up to 100%. 47

48 Choosing and Submitting Student Work

49 Student Work Product Criteria: (page 35) completed by the student. graded and initialed by the teacher. Graded in a way that is clear what is and is not correct. Scorers will not spend time trying to figure out how a teacher graded something. ONE piece of student work should be submitted for the science knowledge entry and one for the inquiry entry. If more than one is submitted, the first student work product will be used for scoring. Examples of work products include drawings or writings, worksheets, journal entries, projects, lab reports, and data sheets. 49

50 Photograph Criteria: (page 35) A photograph of the student participating in the science investigation, not a picture of the student standing next to the finished product, is the only acceptable photograph. Multiple photographs are acceptable. An explanation of the student’s participation must be included on the Photograph Evidence Documentation form. This form can be found in ProFile. To activate the form, click the box under the heading on the SDF. Activate the form on each SDF for each collection period if you are unsure which piece of evidence to submit. This way you will have access to the form, whether or not you need it. NOTE: If you didn’t activate the form and you would like to include student work for that collection period, you may type or hand-write a description and include it with the photograph. This is the ONLY part of the datafolio that can be hand-written. 50

51 Student Work Product Label: (page 35) The optional Student Work Product Label was designed as a reminder to include the required data for student work. Some things to keep in mind: ▫ It is a tool to ensure all information is included; it is NOT required to submit student work. ▫ If a Student Work Product Label is used, that information must correspond to the graded student work attached. ▫ One sheet of labels will be shipped to schools with binder materials. ▫ More labels can be printed from the RIDE website at and click on the “RIAA” tab. ▫ Measured Progress will not ship additional labels to you. 51

52 Student Work Product Label 52 *The student work product must clearly show incorrect/correct answers in addition to accuracy calculation.

53 PS3.2.1a: Identify objects that are or are not attracted to magnets. 53

54 LS1.1.1c: Discriminate between a living and a non-living things 54

55 Correcting Mistakes (page 32) ProFile changes to minimize entry errors No white out for whole sentences No tape, glue, etc. Blank cells stay blank. Page 32 for an example…just cross out and write above. 55

56 Other Forms Table of Contents Checklist – Page 37 FERPA Form – Page 38 & 39 Affirmation of Test Security – Page 40

57 RIAA Science Calendar (inside front cover) 57

58 ProFile Creating your account Registering Students Transferring students Contacting the Help Desk Contacting RIDE


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