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Part IV Chapter 17. Societies appear to be subject to periods of moral panic – where a condition, episode, person, or group of persons emerges to become.

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Presentation on theme: "Part IV Chapter 17. Societies appear to be subject to periods of moral panic – where a condition, episode, person, or group of persons emerges to become."— Presentation transcript:

1 Part IV Chapter 17

2 Societies appear to be subject to periods of moral panic – where a condition, episode, person, or group of persons emerges to become defined as a threat to societal values and interests (Cohen, 1972) When official reaction to a person, groups or series of events is out of proportion to actual threat offered, it is beginning of a moral panic (Hall, 1978) Part 4: Ch. 17

3 Founded on set of implicit value judgments – subject of analysis “bogus” or “exaggerated” Thus, no such thing as “legitimate” panic or “well-founded” hysteria Subject of moral panics by researchers usually based on vested interest of those studying them Old moral panic theory nothing more than social constructionism Part 4: Ch. 17

4 The fear that Muslims will take over U.S. society and enforce Islam on everyone The fear of gay marriage initiatives and the “tainting” of marriage as an institution The fear of crime spreading to the suburbs Part 4: Ch. 17

5 Surprising lack of panic response Popular construction of child pornography factually incorrect Police and media have not exaggerated child-porn menace Images more current & not just recycled from decades past Remarkable amount is very hard-core in nature Process of manufacture involves actual abusive behavior in present, not in distant past Part 4: Ch. 17

6 KG (Kindergarten) collection - 100s-1000s of images from mid-90s depicting girls between ages 3-6 taken in Germany or Scandinavia; Represents one of most “prized collections” on the Internet KX collection – similar collection of images of young girls but with men Largest collection reported by police: 1.5 million Part 4: Ch. 17

7 Lack of technological understanding Lack of controversial control of an issue Lack of media access Invisibility of the problem Preemption by other causes and interest groups Part 4: Ch. 17

8 Threatening and affects children Large-scale with use of heavy Internet security ensuring its expansion Undermining of national laws & sovereignty due to globalization Political implications: Should appeal equally to feminists or conservative law and order adherents Social response: almost nonexistent Part 4: Ch. 17

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10 Diversity of agencies & interest groups Information must be comprehensible to claimsmakers Issue must be overt & accessible Panic should offer narrative Visual portrayal Narrative must have outcome “Meshes” with previous expectations & knowledge Part 4: Ch. 17

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12 Lack of competition among agencies Lack of understanding on part of agencies Over-complex narratives Political embarrassment for agencies Lack of direct impact on consumers Part 4: Ch. 17

13 Do you agree with the author that Internet child pornography hasn’t garnered a moral panic? What typically takes place when pedophiles are “busted” by law enforcement? Part 4: Ch. 17

14 Part IV Chapter 18

15 Part 4: Ch. 18

16 African Americans are disproportionately singled out as deviant & are more likely to be: Under surveillance & stopped Treated disrespectfully Treated with excessive force Less likely to be protected by police Part 4: Ch. 18

17 Comparative analysis of AA youth in poor urban community and how gender shapes interactions with & perceptions of police Survey & in-depth interviews (N = 75) 35 females & 40 males ages years Location: St. Louis, Missouri General findings: Gendered nature of policing in urban Black neighborhoods Young males more likely to be harassed Part 4: Ch. 18

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21 Discussion focused on frequent involuntary contact with police Searches – physically intrusive Space – police thought to limit their use of public space Singled-out – some males understood this, but still found it prejudicial Frustration – especially prevalent when law enforcement didn’t acknowledge innocence Language – found to be antagonistic Part 4: Ch. 18

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23 Curfew violations were most frustrating aspect of contact with police Treatment – as a criminal suspect Desire for protection strong among females Violence against females – some complained about this by law enforcement Treatment – as suspects Part 4: Ch. 18

24 What demographic variables are most salient in enforcing a deviant label on individuals or groups? How is a deviant status used by the police to subordinate less powerful groups? Part 4: Ch. 18


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