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Overview of Library Systems Professor Kristin Vogel.

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Presentation on theme: "Overview of Library Systems Professor Kristin Vogel."— Presentation transcript:

1 Overview of Library Systems Professor Kristin Vogel

2 Today’s Agenda Overview of types of software in use Integrated Library Systems Link Resolver software & federated searching E-resources Management Content Management Systems

3 By the end of today’s sessions: a.Preliminary examination of the software in use in libraries currently Reinforce base knowledge of current systems and trends as foundation for future sessions and investigation b.Provide context in advance of the ILS Symposium

4 Key software in libraries Integrated Library System (ILS) Library 2.0 – related technology – such as reader comments, table of contents / review services, etc., blogs, wikis Link resolver software & federated searching E-resource Management software (ERMS) Content management systems (CMS) and Websites Digital collections Finance/budget management Office productivity software – such as Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint, calendar, knowledge management systems, .

5 Integrated Library Systems (ILS) -- also known as – Integrated Library System (ILS) Automated Library System Library Automation Software Library Management System Historically oriented around management of the physical library collection (i.e. inventory control)

6 Integrated Library Systems (ILS) Standard Functions include: acquisitions, cataloging & serials management, circulation, public interface Characteristics: no repetition of data entry, instantaneous display of info across system

7 Integrated Library Systems (ILS) ILS may or may not include: course reserves (traditional and/or electronic collections of text, audio, & video), e-resources management, interlibrary service, digital reference, materials booking

8 Integrated Library Systems (ILS) Recent directions: New components in web interfaces –faceted browsing – Ex: NC State catalog (uses Endeca), Queens Library (uses AquaBrowser)NC State catalogQueens Library –relevance-ranked results –user rating or tagging (Ex: Amazon.com) –Embedded reviews and tables of content – Ex: I-Share (uses Syndetics)I-Share –visual navigation (see again Queens Library) Radio Frequency ID Technology (RFID) E-resource management

9 Integrated Library Systems (ILS) Commercial, “Homegrown”, and Open Source Ex Libris –commercial –Product: VoyagerConsortium Catalog: CARLICARLI Innovative Interfaces –commercial –Product: Millenium Consortium Catalog: OhioLINKOhioLINK Georgia PINES –Homegrown  OpenSource (ACQ & SER modules are in development.) –Product: Evergreen PINES CatalogPINES Catalog

10 ILS Reading Recommendations **For 2007 industry summary – “An Industry Redefined: private equity moves into ILS and open source support emerges” Library Journal, April 1, 2007

11 ILS Reading Recommendations “Next-Generation Library Catalogs” by Marshall Breeding Library Technology Reports, July/Aug 2007 (E-Table of Contents at https://publications.techsource.ala.org/p roducts/archive.pl?article=2604) https://publications.techsource.ala.org/p roducts/archive.pl?article=2604

12 “Simple” diagram of system constellation for some libraries Voyager by Ex Libris Modules: Acquisitions Serials management Cataloging Circulation & ILL Web OPAC SFX (link resolver) by Ex Libris ContentDM (supported by OCLC) for digital collections WebFeat for federated searching Syndetics for expanded OPAC content ILLiad (supported by OCLC) Ariel & Odyssey Verde by Ex Libris for ERMS Content Management Software for Library Website

13 ILS Reading Recommendations Cervone, Frank. "ILS Migration in the 21st Century: Some New Things to Think About This Time Around" Computers in Libraries 27(7)(July/August 2007): 6-8; Computers in Libraries –Annotation by Roy Tennant from Current Cites (mentioned previously) – Cervone pens a timely and useful article on making the tough transition from one integrated library system to another. Given the current upheaval (some forced, some voluntary) in the ILS market, his advice is timely indeed, and those who are not immediately facing such a migration would nonetheless be wise to pin it to their bulletin board for future use. To rephrase an old quote, there are only two kinds of librarians -- those who have weathered a system migration and those who will. In addition to listing the basic steps of a migration, Cervone includes a summary list of typical tasks and some links to open source web application testing tools. Highly recommended for anyone with an ILS and a future.

14 Link resolver software “Link resolver software brings together information about the cited resource, the user, and the library's many subscriptions, policies, and services. For the software to work, the content providers must be willing to participate as Sources (databases or sites that can provide a link from a reference).” The Lure of Linking: Link resolvers are essential to getting optimal usage of electronic content

15 Link resolver software examples SFX by Ex Libris (used by CARLI libraries) SwetsWise Linker by Swets ArticleLinker by Serial Solutions WebBridge by Innovative Interfaces LinkSource by EBSCO LinkSolver by Ovid Ulrichs Resource Linker by CSA

16 Link resolver software Based on OpenURL standards –Developed by Herbert Van de Sompel and Oren Beit-Arie at the University of Ghent (Belgium) Example URL == 8537&date=2003&volume=44&issue=2&spage=241

17 Reading Recommendation Why OpenURL? D-Lib Magazine, May 2006 Author’s Abstract The improvement of access to scholarly literature caused by electronic journal publishing quickly led to the wish for seamless linking to referenced articles. This article looks at the evolution of linking technologies with a particular focus on OpenURL, now a NISO standard. The implications for stakeholders in the supply chain are explored, including publishers, intermediaries, libraries and readers. The benefits, expectations and business drivers are examined. The article also highlights some novel, existing and potential future, uses, including increased user-empowerment and possibilities beyond referencing traditional bibliographic material.

18 ERMS (E-resource Management) Manages the data of: Descriptive Information Product names & descriptions Aggregator & producer Access URLs Usernames and passwords Administrative interface URLs –Links to usage reports Verification access methods Legal and Financial: Copies of contracts and license agreements –access restrictions License start and end dates Price and payment terms –Renewal alerts Payment records Communication: Vendor contacts and contact history

19 ERMS (E-resource Management) Key Reading: Report of the Digital Library Federation’s Electronic Resources Management Initiative Software availability: ILS module Stand-alone (with interfacing capability) –Commercial –“Homegrown” –Open Source Example: Verde by Ex LibrisVerde

20 Content management systems (CMS) and Websites Software Purposes: Streamline website management Enable individuals without HTML knowledge to create & maintain pages / Decentralize web content maintenance Separate content from design & layout

21 Content Management System

22 CMS Reading Recommendation “Web Content Management systems in higher education” Educause Quarterly, no. 2, Provides detailed reasons for considering CMS implementation and steps for choosing CMS software as well as an overview information on vendors (caution: vendor information is now dated) /Internet/Site_Management/Content_Manageme nt/ provides a long listing of software providers of CMShttp://www.google.com/Top/Computers/Software /Internet/Site_Management/Content_Manageme nt/

23 CMS Directory ftware/Internet/Site_Management/Content _Management/ provides a long listing of software providers of CMShttp://www.google.com/Top/Computers/So ftware/Internet/Site_Management/Content _Management/

24 Digital Asset Management Software that functions parallel to the online catalog for: –Digital slides (art, science) –Video clips –Digital maps, etc. Software examples: CONTENTdm Cumulus 5 Workgroup Destiny Extensis Portfolio FLEXSTOR.db Gallery Systems EmbARK Greenstone Digital Library Software Informix Media Management Insight Software Systems LizardTech - Imaging Software Madison Digital Image Database Slooze The Bulldog Group The Linux Portal Web-Graphics Webware Corp (Mambo)

25 Digital asset collections To explore from Illinois Wesleyan University: John Wesley Powell Collection of Pueblo Pottery u_enthno To explore at University of Illinois: Historical Maps Online - Teaching with Digital Content (resource for teachers) -

26 Another form of digital collections Institutional repositories capture and make available as much of the research output of an institution (i.e. a university) as possible. In the first instance this might include material such as research papers and electronic versions of documents such as theses, but may also include many of the digital assets generated by normal campus life, such as administrative documents, course notes, or learning objects. Key reading: Open Society Institute Guide to Institutional Repositories - SPARC The case for institutional repositories -

27 Reading Recommendation TechEssence

28 Exploration area Creating modules of content that individuals may select and use as building blocks –Widgets or Gadgets –Browser toolbar options (more examination in a future session with Sara Thompson)

29 Embedding widgets in a library webpage

30 iGoogle – a personal webpage of gadgets

31 Library 2.0 philosophy One way of thinking about what drives decisions “ The heart of Library 2.0 is user-centered change. It is a model for library service that encourages constant and purposeful change, inviting user participation in the creation of both the physical and the virtual services they want, supported by consistently evaluating services. It also attempts to reach new users and better serve current ones through improved customer-driven offerings.” “ What makes a service Library 2.0? Any service, physical or virtual, that successfully reaches users, is evaluated frequently, and makes use of customer input is a Library 2.0 service. Even older, traditional services can be Library 2.0 if criteria are met. Similarly, being new is not enough to make a service Library 2.0.” “Service for the next generation” Sept 1, 2006

32 Library 2.0 philosophy

33 Library 2.0 “The heart of Library 2.0 is user-centered change. It is a model for library service that encourages constant and purposeful change, inviting user participation in the creation of both the physical and the virtual services they want, supported by consistently evaluating services. It also attempts to reach new users and better serve current ones through improved customer-driven offerings.” “What makes a service Library 2.0? Any service, physical or virtual, that successfully reaches users, is evaluated frequently, and makes use of customer input is a Library 2.0 service. Even older, traditional services can be Library 2.0 if criteria are met. Similarly, being new is not enough to make a service Library 2.0.” “Service for the next generation” Sept 1, 2006

34 Review of Today’s Agenda Overview of types of software in use Integrated Library Systems Library 2.0 E-resources Management Content Management Systems

35 Going forward Questions?? One-minute Exercise –Complete feedback form, please 1.Most helpful item in today’s sessions 2.A way to improve today’s sessions Spend time in the GSLIS library browsing these readings and online exploring products & ways libraries are creating value for their users

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