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© Nuffield Foundation 2010. Lesson 1: Practice makes perfect.

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Presentation on theme: "© Nuffield Foundation 2010. Lesson 1: Practice makes perfect."— Presentation transcript:

1 © Nuffield Foundation 2010

2 Lesson 1: Practice makes perfect

3 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Lesson 1: Practice makes perfect Learning outcomes You will be able to: plan a simple investigation demonstrate that practice can improve performance refine ideas based on feedback use data to answer a question use graphics to present evidence.

4 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Activity 1.1: Does practice improve performance?

5 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Activity 1.1: Does practice improve performance? Planning your investigation How many repetitions will make a practice session? How many practice sessions should be carried out? What rest period should there be between practice sessions? What data will you record? How will you present your data? How will you use this data to show change in performance?

6 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Activity 1.1: Does practice improve performance? To do Carry out the investigation according to your plan. Make a clear record of the data you collect. Process the data to produce a graphic representation of your findings. Compare your findings with another group. Decide with the other group how you will present your findings to the class.

7 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Lesson 1: Plenary Discuss What do the class results tell us about the effect of practice? How did you make sure you conducted a fair test? Could you reliably compare findings between groups? What are the key points for presenting data clearly?

8 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Lesson 2: Training camp

9 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Lesson 2: Training camp Learning outcomes You will be able to: refine internet searches using phrases construct a training schedule for a particular sport of your choice explain why each element of the schedule is needed.

10 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Activity 2.1: Successful internet searching Record the success of internet searches using: Hockey Training HOCKEY TRAINING hockey training “hockey training” “hockey training programme”

11 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Activity 2.2: Designing a training programme

12 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Activity 2.2: Designing a training programme In groups Design a week-long training programme for an Olympic sport. Conduct some internet research on the following elements of the training: -technique or skill development -fitness -tactics, strategies or teamwork -diet. Explain how each programme element contributes to improved performance, e.g. why is a special diet important?

13 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Lesson 2: Plenary Discuss What are the key points you have learned about successful internet searching? What are some of the key differences in training for the different sports? What elements do training regimes have in common?

14 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Lesson 3: Targets

15 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Lesson 3: Targets Learning outcomes You will be able to: design and use a data collection sheet comment on the scoring systems of ‘target’ games adjust a standard target to produce a fairer level of skill develop a fair scoring system for a target game.

16 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Activity 3.1: Target games In groups of four Examine the cards showing target games. Discuss whether or not the rules for scoring are ‘fair’. Write down what you mean by ‘fair’ as it applies to a target game.

17 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Activity 3.2: Designing a scoring system for a target game In groups of four you will be given a target to use for a coin tossing game. You will need to: work out how to play the game, for example putting the target on a table and throwing coins at it establish clear rules for your game produce a table to record the results and scoring process your data from playing the game develop a scoring system that allows groups to compete, and rewards skill and strategy rather than luck.

18 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Lesson 3: Plenary Discuss How can scoring systems of games be fair? How can scoring systems reward skill rather than luck?

19 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Lesson 4: League tables Image by Brian Minkoff London Pixels reproduced under theCreative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

20 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Lesson 4: League tables Learning outcomes You will be able to: use a spreadsheet to make calculations on a league system calculate how different points systems might affect playing strategies use spreadsheets to model a situation extract data from charts, tables and lists interpret and discuss numerical informatio n.

21 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Activity 4.1: How do points affect Formula 1 championship positions? You will be given a point score table for Grand Prix positions. The scoring system changed in Position Points 2008/ Points 2009/

22 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Activity 4.1: How do points affect Formula 1 championship positions? Either Recalculate the positions of the drivers in the Formula 1 championship for 2008/9 using the 2009/10 scoring system. Or Recalculate the positions of the drivers in the Formula 1 championship for 2009/10 using the 2008/9 scoring system. And Discover whether Jenson Button would still be world champion using either system.

23 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Activity 4.2: Premier league positions In 1980 the premier league changed its points system from 2 points for a win to 3 points for a win. Use the premiership table 2009/10 to see whether changing the points system would affect the position of any teams. Pod 1 Premiership results spreadsheet.xlsx

24 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Lesson 4: Plenary Discuss In which of the two sports did changing the points system have an effect? Why? How would changing the points system affect the statistics for Formula 1 drivers and premier league clubs? What are the benefits of spreadsheets for this type of modelling exercise?

25 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Lesson 5: What’s the score?

26 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Lesson 5: What’s the score? Learning outcomes You will be able to: design a new scoring system for a familiar game explain how your new system has altered the game make and present a poster about your new game to an audience.

27 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Activity 5.1: Designing a new game You are going to redesign a familiar game. You can only alter the game in the following ways: Change the dimensions of the playing area and ‘goal’ or ‘target’. Change the number of points for scoring a goal or hitting the target. Award points for things other than scoring, for example assists or free kicks.

28 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Activity 5.1: Designing a new game You could adjust the scoring of a current game to create one of the following: children’s party game game that lasts a minute game that lasts a year game where the winner is only revealed at the end a team game where only one person on each side can score a knockout competition where losers get a second chance game where the first one to 50 wins game where the first to score wins game that has five different ways to score.

29 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Activity 5.1: Designing a new game Make a poster to present to another group The poster should provide information on: how the chosen game has been improved who the new audience might be what new tactics or strategies might be employed how a league or competition might be organised.

30 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Activity 5.2: Presenting the game Use the criteria in Activity sheet 5.2 to share feedback on your posters with one other group. Make your feedback positive. Suggest improvements rather than simply criticise. Try to balance positive and negative comments.

31 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Activity 5.2: Presenting the game Remember The poster should provide information on: how the chosen game has been improved who the new audience might be what new tactics or strategies might be employed how a league or competition might be organised.

32 © Nuffield Foundation 2010 Lesson 5: Plenary Discuss Which scoring systems have been most effective and why? Are there any general principles for designing a good points system or league table? What key points summarise what makes a good information poster?


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