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ENVIRONMENTAL AND ECONOMIC RESOURCES FOR WASTE DISPOSAL BY: MOLLY COHEN JENNY EKERN MGMT605-1401A-02 Graduate Research Methods January 13, 2014.

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Presentation on theme: "ENVIRONMENTAL AND ECONOMIC RESOURCES FOR WASTE DISPOSAL BY: MOLLY COHEN JENNY EKERN MGMT605-1401A-02 Graduate Research Methods January 13, 2014."— Presentation transcript:

1 ENVIRONMENTAL AND ECONOMIC RESOURCES FOR WASTE DISPOSAL BY: MOLLY COHEN JENNY EKERN MGMT A-02 Graduate Research Methods January 13, 2014

2 How much people waste

3 Would the incorporation of recycling programs be beneficial?  The purpose statement of my purpose is to analyze the cost measures that recycling measures can provide. The interest levels for people living in the city, as far as participating in recycling programs would they be interested in paying $5.00 dollars a month for recycling programs?  Which would consist of educational programs for schools, on how to recycle, and recycling centers within a community.

4 The problem with waste  Without the concept of recycling and waste management, the  human environment would essentially be overly used, and overly polluted with waste. It is careless to reduce the Earths capacity to supply new raw materials in the future. The capacity of the natural environment to absorb and process materials is under stress when the earth is trying to break down too much waste. (Full Cycle, 2014).  Valuable resources in the form of matter and energy are lost during waste disposal, requiring that a greater burden be placed on ecosystems to provide these. The main problem is the sheer volume of waste being produced and how we deal with it. One way to help the environment break down waste is to recycle. (Full Cycle, 2014).

5 What can people do to help the environment?  Recycling reuses materials, rather than just using new ones. If a person recycled paper, that could make more paper, using the used paper, instead of having to cut down whole new trees. In order to recycle paper a person could put wasted paper into a container, and at the end of the week take this paper to a recycling plant to be recycled and re-used. This could be done with plastics, and aluminum cans. (Full Cycle, 2014).

6 How are research topics selected  Research topics are selected based on the purpose of an author. Research can be based on an argument, trying to prove a specific side, in some cases why recycling is essential or not essential. Research can be used within an experiment. (M.U.S.E, 2014). An experiment can be based on whether or not candescent light bulbs are better then incandescent light bulbs, etc.

7 The Purpose statement  A purpose statement, states the purpose of research or what an author is trying to show, or depict. (M.U.S.E, 2014). The purpose statement states the purpose, of what the author is writing or trying to say. One purpose statement could be: that eating fruits and vegetables from a garden is better then eating fruits and vegetables bought from a store, and a research paper could state reasons why.

8 Research questions and hypothesis  When the purpose of writing is established a hypothesis can then be formulated. Research questions are then developed based on what the author is trying to research or depict. One hypothesis could be that eating fruits and vegetables from a garden is better then eating fruits and vegetables from a supermarket, which is my hypothesis, my research questions are: who? What? When? Where? Why? And, how, behind my experiment. (M.U.S.E, 2014).  Examples: how are vegetables/fruits grown from a garden better?

9 The null and alternative hypothesis  When a researcher, establishes what their hypothesis is goes over their research, and research questions, then tests their hypothesis, a test can become opposite of what the researcher has originally expected, that researcher would come up with a null or alternative hypothesis. One example of this could be that hydrochloride can be added to sugar, and then consumed by a human. Through, research it could be found out that hydrochloride is toxic to humans, so it is evident in this case that an alternative hypothesis would be appropriate, like hydrochloride cannot be added to sugar, and be consumed by a human. (M.U.S.E, 2014).

10 References Duke University. (2014). How Much Do We Waste Daily? Retrieved from: facts-consumers/how-much-do-we-waste-daily facts-consumers/how-much-do-we-waste-daily The Environmental Protection Agency. (2014). Tips: Top Ten Ways to Recycle. Retrieved from: ten-ways-to-recycle.aspxhttp://eponline.com/articles/2007/11/12/tips-top- ten-ways-to-recycle.aspx

11 Reference Full Cycle. (2014). What is Waste and Why is it a Problem? Retrieved from: it-a-problem.htmlhttp://www.fullcycle.co.za/index.php/what-is-waste-and-why-is- it-a-problem.html My Unique Student Experience. (2014). Hypothesis Testing. [Course Materials]. Retrieved from: Virtual Campus: CTUOnline: My Student Experience. (2014). Hypothesis Testing Part. 2. [Course Materials]. Retrieved from: Virtual Campus: CTUOnline:

12 References Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. (2014). Recycling Programs. Retrieved from: m/recycle/document/Fin_Sust_Rec.pdf m/recycle/document/Fin_Sust_Rec.pdf United States Environmental Protection Agency. (2014). Municipal Solid Waste (MSW,) in the U S: Facts and Figures. Retrieved from:


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