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Becoming a High Impact Board Susan Salter Director of Board Development Alabama Association of School Boards.

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Presentation on theme: "Becoming a High Impact Board Susan Salter Director of Board Development Alabama Association of School Boards."— Presentation transcript:

1 Becoming a High Impact Board Susan Salter Director of Board Development Alabama Association of School Boards

2 Getting Started Write your name on a tent card and place it in front of you at your table. Introduce yourself to others at your table and share why you serve on the school board.

3 Participants will ~  Understand how school boards work to improve student learning and achievement.  Understand the roles of the board and superintendent. Objectives

4 What is: What should be: Percentage of time spent on student learning

5 What do school boards in high achieving systems do differently?

6 Traits of “high-impact” boards Consistently express the belief that all students can learn and that schools can teach all students. Far more knowledgeable about teaching and learning issues.

7 Traits of “high-impact” boards Use a variety of data to make decisions. Create a supportive workplace for staff. Balance systemwide direction with building-level autonomy. Involve their communities.

8 Set clear expectations Create the conditions for success Hold the system accountable Build public will Learn together as a board team Emerging Understanding about the Role of the Board in Improving Student Learning

9 Effective boards don’t micromanage

10 What is “Key Work”? So what does all this look like in the real world?

11 Vision Standards Collaboration Assessment Climate Alignment Accountability Continuous Improvement

12 Vision

13 13 Vision isn’t about where schools are; it’s about where the stakeholders want them to be. student achievement as top priority It establishes student achievement as top priority of board, staff and community. Vision

14 Roles for Vision: Board  Set the expectation for creating a vision & mission  Approve the vision & mission  Use them to guide  Communicate them at all opportunities  Recommend a process  Assure staff support to carry out the process.  Propose a strategic plan to make vision a reality Superintendent

15 Vision Standards

16 16 Define what students should know and be able to do at key points in their school careers. Define how well students must be able to perform in order the meet the standards. Standards: Standards

17 17 What should students know and be able to do at each grade level? Is the bar set high enough? Is it too high? Has the board provided the training and resources the staff needs to do this? Questions to ask: Standards

18 Roles for Standards: Board  Provide policy  Provide resources  Build community support  ID options for the board to consider  Implement decisions  Provide data & info on results Superintendent

19 Vision Standards Assessment

20 20 Assessment … Provides data on individual progress toward standards. Identify teachers who are most successful. Enable teachers to deliver individualized instruction. Assessment

21 Roles for Assessment: Board  Provide policy  Provide resources  Build community support  ID options for the board to consider  Implement decisions  Provide data & info on results Superintendent

22 Vision Standards Assessment Accountability

23 23 ccountability Establish a strong, shared accountability process focused on:  individual student results;  comprehensive data collection;  growth and improvement as well as scores;  transparent, honest reporting. Accountability

24 Not about finding the guilty Not about blaming Not about punishing Accountability

25 Roles for Accountability: Board  Provide policy  Provide resources  Communicate to stakeholders  ID options for the board to consider  Implement decisions  Provide data & info on results Superintendent

26 The Power of the Right Questions Being effective leaders for student learning and achievement does not require board members to have all the answers, but it does require them to ask the right, and sometimes hard, questions.

27 Table Activity What questions should you be asking at the board table to ensure accountability? What data should you be studying?

28 Vision Standards Assessment Alignment Accountability

29 29 How you choose to use your resources speaks volumes about the board’s “real” goals and sends a message to staff and community about the seriousness of your intent. Alignment

30 Alignment is the difference between a regatta and an armada. 30

31 Align resources and practices to focus on student learning and achievement by considering: budget; staff allocation; curriculum, textbooks, technology and supplies; staff development choices; students and schools with greatest needs. Alignment

32 Alignment is NOT about how much you need, but about how you use what you have. Remember, Everything is not a priority. Keep first things, first. What? Alignment

33 Roles for Alignment: Board  Provide policy  Provide resources  Build community support  ID options for the board to consider  Implement decisions  Provide data & info on results Superintendent

34 Vision Standards Assessment Climate Alignment Accountability

35 35 Create a positive climate for student success. Climate

36 Do students and staff feel safe? Does the staff feel empowered to meet student needs? Does the board show respect and professionalism in meetings and in work with superintendent and staff? Climate

37 Are the facilities good work places for employees? How is morale? Is the student Code of Conduct clear, fair, appropriate? Climate

38 Vision Standards Collaboration Assessment Climate Alignment Accountability

39 Public schools cannot raise achievement alone. Build partnerships to capitalize on community resources. Collaboration

40 With and among staff With parents With the community With business and political leaders Collaboration

41 Vision Standards Collaboration Assessment Climate Alignment Accountability Continuous Improvement

42 42 Continuous Improvement is a thoughtful, constant process: Question, Examine, Revise, Refine and Revisit Continuous Improvement

43 43  Customer focus  Data-based decisions  The right questions at the right time  Open communication  Celebrating and rewarding improvement Continuous Improvement

44 Culture Change Cost/schedule Decide by hunch Internal standards Fire fighting Self focus Quality first Decide by fact Customer focus Prevention Mutual respect Continuous Improvement

45 Individual Do your own thing Competition Been there, done that Fix the blame Team Share ideas Collaboration Is there another way? Fix the problem Continuous Improvement Culture Change

46 Set clear expectations Create the conditions for success Hold the system accountable Build public will Learn together as a board team The board’s role in improving student learning

47 Set clear expectations Create the conditions for success Hold the system accountable Build public will Learn together as a board team Vision, standards, accountability Alignment, climate, continuous improvement Accountability, assessment Vision, collaboration Continuous improvement LighthouseKey Work

48 Becoming a High Impact Board Questions?


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