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Colonel Harland David Sanders (September 9, 1890 – December 16, 1980)

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Presentation on theme: "Colonel Harland David Sanders (September 9, 1890 – December 16, 1980)"— Presentation transcript:

1 Colonel Harland David Sanders (September 9, 1890 – December 16, 1980)

2 Colonel Sanders Founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC), and later acting as the company's goodwill ambassador and symbol Founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC), and later acting as the company's goodwill ambassador and symbol Sanders held a number of jobs in his early life, such as a fireman, insurance salesman and running filling stations Sanders held a number of jobs in his early life, such as a fireman, insurance salesman and running filling stations He began selling fried chicken from his roadside restaurant in Corbin, Kentucky, during the Great Depression. He began selling fried chicken from his roadside restaurant in Corbin, Kentucky, during the Great Depression.

3 Achievement In 1924, by chance, he met the general manager of Standard Oil of Kentucky, who asked him to run a service station in Nicholasville. In 1930, the station closed as a result of the Great Depression. In 1924, by chance, he met the general manager of Standard Oil of Kentucky, who asked him to run a service station in Nicholasville. In 1930, the station closed as a result of the Great Depression. In 1930, the Shell Oil Company offered Sanders a service station in Corbin, Kentucky rent free, in return for paying them a percentage of sales. Sanders began to serve chicken dishes and other meals such as country ham and steaks. In 1930, the Shell Oil Company offered Sanders a service station in Corbin, Kentucky rent free, in return for paying them a percentage of sales. Sanders began to serve chicken dishes and other meals such as country ham and steaks.

4 Since he did not have a restaurant, he served the customers in his adjacent living quarters. He was commissioned as a Kentucky Colonel in 1935 by Kentucky governor Ruby Laffoon. His local popularity grew, and in 1939 food critic Duncan Hines visited Sanders's restaurant and included it in Adventures in Good Eating, his guide to restaurants throughout the US. Since he did not have a restaurant, he served the customers in his adjacent living quarters. He was commissioned as a Kentucky Colonel in 1935 by Kentucky governor Ruby Laffoon. His local popularity grew, and in 1939 food critic Duncan Hines visited Sanders's restaurant and included it in Adventures in Good Eating, his guide to restaurants throughout the US. By July 1940, Sanders had finalized his "Secret Recipe" for frying chicken in a pressure fryer that cooked the chicken faster than pan frying. By July 1940, Sanders had finalized his "Secret Recipe" for frying chicken in a pressure fryer that cooked the chicken faster than pan frying. Achievement

5 Sanders was "re-commissioned" as a Kentucky Colonel in 1949 by his friend, Governor Lawrence Wetherby. Sanders was "re-commissioned" as a Kentucky Colonel in 1949 by his friend, Governor Lawrence Wetherby. In 1952, Sanders franchised "Kentucky Fried Chicken" for the first time, to Pete Sanders of South Salt Lake, Utah, the operator of one of that city's largest restaurants. In 1952, Sanders franchised "Kentucky Fried Chicken" for the first time, to Pete Sanders of South Salt Lake, Utah, the operator of one of that city's largest restaurants. Achievement

6 In the first year of selling the product, restaurant sales more than tripled, with 75% of the increase coming from sales of fried chicken. In the first year of selling the product, restaurant sales more than tripled, with 75% of the increase coming from sales of fried chicken. For Sanders, the addition of fried chicken was a way of differentiating his restaurant from competitors; in Utah, a product hailing from Kentucky was unique and evoked imagery of Southern hospitality. For Sanders, the addition of fried chicken was a way of differentiating his restaurant from competitors; in Utah, a product hailing from Kentucky was unique and evoked imagery of Southern hospitality. Don Anderson, a sign painter hired by Sanders, coined the name Kentucky Fried Chicken. Don Anderson, a sign painter hired by Sanders, coined the name Kentucky Fried Chicken. Achievement

7 Sanders decided to begin to franchise his chicken concept in earnest, and travelled the US looking for suitable restaurants. Sanders decided to begin to franchise his chicken concept in earnest, and travelled the US looking for suitable restaurants. The franchise approach became highly successful; KFC was one of the first fast food chains to expand internationally, opening outlets in Canada and later in England, Mexico and Jamaica by the mid-1960s. The franchise approach became highly successful; KFC was one of the first fast food chains to expand internationally, opening outlets in Canada and later in England, Mexico and Jamaica by the mid-1960s. Achievement

8 quotations “You got to like your work. You have got to like what you are doing, you have got to be doing something worthwhile so you can like it - because it is worthwhile, that it makes a difference, don't you see?” “I've only had two rules: Do all you can and do it the best you can. It's the only way you ever get that feeling of accomplishing something.”

9 Sanders was not born into a rich family. Instead, he spent much of his youth living and working out on his own, trying to support himself and stay off the streets. But, he did not let that stand in the way of his future success. In fact, the experience as a young boy taught him how to make do with what he had available to him. And, it was precisely that attitude that was able to lift KFC off the ground. lessons

10 Sanders was a true entrepreneur. He actually made the chicken that would become famous and came up with a secret recipe of 11 herbs and spices. It didn’t end there, as he began to franchise his secret recipe to other restaurants he was truly involved in the work. He was uncompromising in his approach to the quality of his product and apparently had the vocabulary to be sure that franchisees understood that he would take his pressure cooker and leave if they didn’t make it exactly right. lessons

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