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Table of Contents Content Literacy Strategies Meta cognitive Literacy RoutinesMeta cognitive Literacy Routines Additional Resources You may browse through.

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Presentation on theme: "Table of Contents Content Literacy Strategies Meta cognitive Literacy RoutinesMeta cognitive Literacy Routines Additional Resources You may browse through."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Table of Contents Content Literacy Strategies Meta cognitive Literacy RoutinesMeta cognitive Literacy Routines Additional Resources You may browse through this book by using the arrows at the bottom of the page, or by clicking on a specific link. Right-click Full Screen Esc to end Planning Lessons Incorporating Reading in the Content Areas

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4 Author’s Craft Annotate Text Double sided entries “I saw, I thought” Journal Entry Content Literacy Strategies Table of Contents

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6 Table of Contents Author’s Craft - Teacher talks aloud as he or she experiences text, discussing what he or she is thinking as he or she is reading Also point out that students should use the whole page to develop comprehension such as heading, sub-headings, key questions, pictures, bold-faced words and definitions.

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8 Table of Contents Annotate Text · Summarize subtopics (picking out and recording key concepts) Maybe use this for a review exercise before a quiz or test Paraphrasing difficult segments. (using their own words to interpret reading passage.) Maybe use this to address topics with which students typically struggle. Preempt this with a visual representation of the difficult concepts (i.e.: a diagram, chart, picture or video clip). Question orally to check for understanding. Then have students write to explain.

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10 Table of Contents Double Sided Entries Double sided entries Use a T formation to split a piece of paper in half. List Content: 1. a definition you want students to know 2. a question you want them to consider 3. a difficult concept you want them to grasp 4. to get them to go deeper with a concept 5. to illicit background knowledge to connect the concept to real world issues or events Have Students: 1. ask a question about the content 2. connect the content to other information or experience 3. have students note a personal response to content 4. have students decide what else they need to know

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12 Table of Contents “I saw / I thought” Journal Entry (Students write about a topic, i.e., I saw an overweight man in about his fifties drop to the floor in a German train station while pushing his luggage. After 45 minutes of CPR, the man never revived. I was so surprised that heart attacks can kill so quickly.) In one column, students record what they saw in reading their text.

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14 Develop Metacognitive Literacy Routines Preambles Students write at least a third of the page at the beginning of class about what they know about today ’ s topic and what they want to know. Then, students share. The teacher locates a kernel of worthwhile content knowledge from student sharing to develop confidence in students in the content and interest in the topic. Teachers can find prompts for this exercise at: This might work as an entrance activity. Students might use this to review content from previous class, homework, labs, or reading. Table of Contents

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16 Additional Resources 1.A Handbook of Content Literacy Strategies: 125 Practical Reading and Writing Ideas by Elaine C. Stephens and Jean E. Brow 2. Do I Really Have to Teach Reading by Chris Tovani Table of Contents Home Page

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18 Table of Contents Content Literacy Strategies Meta cognitive Literacy RoutinesMeta cognitive Literacy Routines Additional Resources You may browse through this book by using the arrows at the bottom of the page, or by clicking on a specific link. Right-click Full Screen Esc to end Planning Lessons Incorporating Reading in the Content Areas

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20 Author’s Craft Annotate Text Double sided entries “I saw, I thought” Journal Entry Content Literacy Strategies Table of Contents

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22 Table of Contents Author’s Craft - Teacher talks aloud as he or she experiences text, discussing what he or she is thinking as he or she is reading Also point out that students should use the whole page to develop comprehension such as heading, sub-headings, key questions, pictures, bold-faced words and definitions.

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24 Table of Contents Annotate Text - Summarize subtopics (picking out and recording key concepts) Maybe use this for a review exercise before a quiz or test Paraphrasing difficult segments. (using their own words to interpret reading passage.) Maybe use this to address topics with which students typically struggle. Preempt this with a visual representation of the difficult concepts (i.e.: a diagram, chart, picture or video clip). Question orally to check for understanding. Then have students write to explain.

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26 Table of Contents Double Sided Entries · Double sided entries Use a T formation to split a piece of paper in half. List Content: 1. a definition you want students to know 2. a question you want them to consider 3. a difficult concept you want them to grasp 4. to get them to go deeper with a concept 5. to illicit background knowledge to connect the concept to real world issues or events Have Students: 1. ask a question about the content 2. connect the content to other information or experience 3. have students note a personal response to content 4. have students decide what else they need to know

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28 Table of Contents “I saw / I thought” Journal Entry (Students write about a topic, i.e., I saw an overweight man in about his fifties drop to the floor in a German train station while pushing his luggage. After 45 minutes of CPR, the man never revived. I was so surprised that heart attacks can kill so quickly.) In one column, students record what they saw in reading their text.

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30 Develop Metacognitive Literacy Routines Preambles Students write at least a third of the page at the beginning of class about what they know about today ’ s topic and what they want to know. Then, students share. The teacher locates a kernel of worthwhile content knowledge from student sharing to develop confidence in students in the content and interest in the topic. Teachers can find prompts for this exercise at: This might work as an entrance activity. Students might use this to review content from previous class, homework, labs, or reading. Table of Contents

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32 Additional Resources 1.A Handbook of Content Literacy Strategies: 125 Practical Reading and Writing Ideas by Elaine C. Stephens and Jean E. Brow 2. Do I Really Have to Teach Reading by Chris Tovani Table of Contents Home Page


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