Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Reading in the Curriculum. Reading Fluency General Discussion  What is a fluent reader?  How do you help your students become fluent readers?

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Reading in the Curriculum. Reading Fluency General Discussion  What is a fluent reader?  How do you help your students become fluent readers?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Reading in the Curriculum

2

3 Reading Fluency

4 General Discussion  What is a fluent reader?  How do you help your students become fluent readers?

5 Types of Readers “Fluent Readers” read about 200 words per minutes with 70% accuracy. We can utilize different techniques to help our students become fluent readers.

6 Demonstration 1: Word Recognition  This exercise practices “automaticity,” so students don’t need to decode every time they encounter a word.  The goal is to train students’ eye movements in a right to left pattern and to practice similarly shaped letters or combinations.  Procedure: Read a word or phrase on the left and then circle the same word or phrase on the right. 30 seconds are given in which to complete 25 items.  Recommendation: Students correct each other’s papers.

7 Demonstration 2: Rate Build up, Silent Reading  1. Read silently as quickly as possible for one minute.  2. Mark the place where you stop.  3. Start reading again from the beginning and read for one minute.  4. Mark the place where you stop.  5. Count the number of words that you read the first and second time and record the numbers in the chart. ***Teachers should prepare by counting the number of words in each paragraph (cumulatively) so that students can count quickly.***

8 Demonstration 2: Rate Build up, Oral Reading 1. Read as quickly as possible to your partner for one minute. 2. Mark the place where you stop. / 3. Start reading again from the beginning and read for one minute. 4. Mark the place where you stop. / 5. Count the number of words that you read the first and second time and record the numbers in the chart.

9 Reading in the Curriculum: Reading Strategies

10 Discussion  What are “strategic” readers?  What reading strategies do you currently teach in your classes? How do they help the students?

11 KWL Charts  A KWL chart can be a useful tool when you are reading something new and, possibly, unfamiliar that helps you to activate your knowledge and to focus your reading about a topic.  Here's the process:

12 K = What do you already KNOW about the topic?  We are going to use the topic of “Content- based Instruction” as our practice topic.  In your group, write down everything you know about content-based instruction.  Share with the rest of the class.

13 W= What do you want to know about the topic.  What kind of information do you want to know about the topic of content-based instruction?  Make some predictions about the kind of information that this chapter will answer.  In your group, make a list of questions.

14 L= What I learned Reading 1: Skimming  Now, skim the first two sections of chapter 10 – “What is content-based instruction,” and “Background to content-based instruction.”  First check any information that you wrote in the K columns to confirm any information you wrote – put a √ mark by those items. If any information differed, write the new information in the “L” column of your chart.  Now, see if you can answer any questions you wrote in the “W” column. Write the answers in the “L” column.  Finally, write any other information you learned from skimming in the “L” column.

15 L= What I learned Reading 2: Detailed reading  Read the full selection. As you read, continue to check your “K” and “W” columns and adding information to the “L” column.  Share the information with your group and then with the whole class.

16 Reading Strategy: SQ3R  This is a method for reading that takes some familiar strategies but adds a few new elements.

17 SQ3R Step 1: Survey  Skim the text  The Title  Headings  Subheadings (if any)  First and last sentences  Visual information (charts, graphs, pictures)  Highlighted words and their sentences Task 1: Skim section 3 of Chapter 10, Content-based instruction. Write down information you learn from skimming.

18 SQ3R Step 2 - Question  Change the title and headings and the first sentence of each section from statements to questions.  Write these questions on notepaper. These questions will help you focus your reading.  Predict what the answers to these questions might be before you read the whole text. Task 2: In your group, change the title and headings for the section: “Principles for content-based instruction” (p 205) Read the first sentence of each section and change it to a question. Write these questions in the space provided on the handout.

19 SQ3R Step 3: Read  Read quickly but comfortably and with attention to the questions you wrote one time.  Go back and read again. This time, under each question, take notes about what you learned.

20 SQ3R Step 4: Recall  Without looking at your book OR your notes, try to “see” the reading, that is, make a mental picture of the main points or highlights immediately after you finish. This will probably take more time than the actual reading itself. Here’s why this is important: a. It shows you what you do or don’t understand of the text, b. It transforms the ideas into ones that are natural and usable. c. It makes you think! Task 3: Read the section “Principles for content-based instruction” (p ) one time quickly but comfortably. Read again. After you read each section, take notes on your paper. Practice RECALL at the end of each section. Remember DON’T LOOK! Try to “see” the information as you remember it.

21 SQ3R Step 5: Review  Check to see how well you recalled the information by reviewing your questions, answers, notes and book.  Try to find where you are missing information or misremembering information.  Make note on how ideas were connected together and their relationships to the whole reading. Task 4: Review the reading and then see if you can answer any of the questions that you wrote during the “Q.”

22 Ways to extend this method  Using the questions that they wrote during the “Questioning” step, students write a summary of the reading to demonstrate their comprehension.


Download ppt "Reading in the Curriculum. Reading Fluency General Discussion  What is a fluent reader?  How do you help your students become fluent readers?"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google