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Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Chapter 9 Excavators.

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Presentation on theme: "Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Chapter 9 Excavators."— Presentation transcript:

1 Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Chapter 9 Excavators

2 TRENCH SAFETY

3 Time and again noncompliance with trench safety guidelines and common sense results in the loss of life from cave-ins and entrapments. The death rate for trench-related accidents is nearly double that for any other type of construction accident.

4 TRENCH SAFETY OSHA recently revised Subpart P, Excavations, of 29 CFR ,.651, and.652 to make the standard easier to understand. The primary hazard of trenching and excavation is employee injury from collapse.

5 TRENCH SAFETY Additional hazards include working close to heavy machinery, manual handling of materials, working in proximity to traffic, electrical hazards from overhead and underground power-lines, and underground utilities such as natural gas.

6 TYPE A SOILS Cohesive soils with an unconfined compressive strength of 1.5 tons per square foot (tsf) (144 kPa) or greater. Examples of Type A cohesive soils are often: clay, silty clay, sandy clay, clay loam and, in some cases, silty clay loam and sandy clay loam.

7 TYPE A SOILS No soil is Type A if it is fissured, is subject to vibration of any type, has previously been disturbed, is part of a sloped, layered system where the layers dip into the excavation on a slope of 4 horizontal to 1 vertical (4H:1V) or greater, or has seeping water.

8 TYPE B SOILS Cohesive soils with an unconfined compressive strength greater than 0.5 tsf (48 kPa) but less than 1.5 tsf (144 kPa). Examples of other Type B soils are: angular gravel; silt; silt loam; previously disturbed soils unless otherwise classified as Type C.

9 TYPE B SOILS Soils that meet the unconfined compressive strength or cementation requirements of Type A soils but are fissured or subject to vibration; dry unstable rock; and layered systems sloping into the trench at a slope less than 4H:1V (only if the material would be classified as a Type B soil).

10 TYPE C SOILS Cohesive soils with an unconfined compressive strength of 0.5 tsf (48 kPa) or less. Other Type C soils include granular soils such as gravel, sand and loamy sand, submerged soil, soil from which water is freely seeping, and submerged rock that is not stable.

11 TYPE C SOILS Also included in this classification is material in a sloped, layered system where the layers dip into the excavation or have a slope of four horizontal to one vertical (4H:1V) or greater.

12 SLOPING AND BENCHING Allowable slopes for excavations less than 20 ft are based on soil type.

13 SLOPING AND BENCHING Maximum allowable slopes for excavations less than 20 ft based on soil type and angle to the horizontal are: Soil typeHeight/Depth Slope angle Stable Rock Vertical 90º Type A ¾:1 53º Type B 1:1 45º Type C 1½:1 34º

14 TYPE A SOILS

15 TYPE B SOILS

16 TYPE C SOILS

17 INGRESS AND EGRESS Access to and exit from the trench require the following conditions: Trenches 4 ft or more in depth should be provided with a fixed means of egress.

18 INGRESS AND EGRESS Spacing between ladders or other means of egress must be such that a worker will not have to travel more than 25 ft laterally to the nearest means of egress. Ladders must be secured and extend a minimum of 36 in (0.9 m) above the landing.

19 SHORING Shoring is a support system for trench faces used to prevent movement of soil, underground utilities, roadways, and foundations. Shoring or shielding is used when the location or depth of the cut makes sloping back to the maximum allowable slope impractical. Shoring systems consist of posts, wales, struts, and sheeting.

20 TRENCH BOXES Trench boxes are different from shoring because, instead of shoring up or otherwise supporting the trench face, they are intended primarily to protect workers from cave- ins and similar incidents.

21 SIGNS of TRENCH DISTRESS Jeffrey J. Lew, P.E., Purdue University and Dr. Louis J. Thompson, P.E., Texas A & M University have developed six common trench distress signs: 1.Cracks in the soil parallel to or in the face of an excavation.

22 SIGNS of TRENCH DISTRESS 2. Subsidence of the edge or bulging of the side of the excavation. This may be hard to see, but is extremely dangerous. 3. Heaving or boiling of the bottom of the excavation, which is an indication of imminent failure.

23 SIGNS of TRENCH DISTRESS 4. Spalling or raveling of the face of the excavation. This probably indicates lack of proper sheeting and the lack of, or failure to, classify the soil. 5. Water running into the excavation from the surface or face. Employees are not permitted to work in excavations with standing or running water.

24 SIGNS of TRENCH DISTRESS 6. Bending, buckling, or groaning of any support member. If any movement of a support member can be seen or heard, an extremely dangerous situation exists.


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