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(C) 2004 Mulitfacet ProjectUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison Ten Commandments for Poor Technology Transfer Mark D. Hill Computer Sciences Department University.

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Presentation on theme: "(C) 2004 Mulitfacet ProjectUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison Ten Commandments for Poor Technology Transfer Mark D. Hill Computer Sciences Department University."— Presentation transcript:

1 (C) 2004 Mulitfacet ProjectUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison Ten Commandments for Poor Technology Transfer Mark D. Hill Computer Sciences Department University of Wisconsin—Madison February Acknowledgements: Multifacet Sponsors, David Patterson, & David Wood

2 Wisconsin Multifacet Project Tech Transfer 2 Ten Commandments for Poor Technology Transfer I. Always work 30 years in the future. –That way no one can prove you wrong before retirement. II. Always start with a clean slate. –Why be encumbered by past successes? III. Remember that publishing papers is the end of research and technology transfer. –If people don't have time to read your papers, their loss. IV. Always remember that you are smarter than people in industry. –You balance research with teaching a few classes, while they only make systems with multi-million-transistor chips. V. Never give talks in industry. –They might make you wear a badge.

3 Wisconsin Multifacet Project Tech Transfer 3 Ten Commandments for Poor Technology Transfer VI. Never hold industrial affiliates meetings or get feedback from industry on your research agenda. –Industrial people know little about real computer architecture. VII. Never allow your students to do internships in industry (or, even worse, take a sabbatical there). –Industrial people might get to know your students and corrupt them (or corrupt you!). VIII. Never consult for industry. –One might spend time on problems people care about. IX. Protect your intellectual property by not telling industry (or anyone else) what you are doing until patents are filed. –Lawyers are more fun than your computer architecture colleagues. X. When meeting industrial people, just ask for money and don't waste time building long-term relationships. –Relationships are for people in the humanities

4 Wisconsin Multifacet Project Tech Transfer 4 Ten Commandments for Poor Technology Transfer I. Always work 30 years in the future. II. Always start with a clean slate. III. Remember that publishing papers is the end of research and technology transfer. IV. Always remember that you are smarter than people in industry. V. Never give talks in industry. VI. Never hold industrial affiliates meetings or get feedback from industry on your research agenda. VII. Never allow your students to do internships in industry (or, even worse, take a sabbatical there). VIII. Never consult for industry. IX. Protect your intellectual property by not telling industry (or anyone else) what you are doing until patents are filed. X. When meeting industrial people, just ask for money and don't waste time building long-term relationships.


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