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Presented By: Brenda, Celina, Tracy, Vanessa, Frank, Donald and Shawn Puerto Rican Children: Now.

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Presentation on theme: "Presented By: Brenda, Celina, Tracy, Vanessa, Frank, Donald and Shawn Puerto Rican Children: Now."— Presentation transcript:

1 Presented By: Brenda, Celina, Tracy, Vanessa, Frank, Donald and Shawn Puerto Rican Children: Now

2 Study Questions What are two factors that contribute to high poverty rate in Puerto Rican families? low earnings capacity, inadequate financial support provided by nonresidential fathers What is a negative consequence for Puerto Rican children living in poverty? risk of health problems What do Puerto Rican children place under their beds during the Feast of Epiphany’s Eve on Jan 6th? Water and grass for the Three Kings camels. What is the tradition that commemorates going from girlhood to womanhood? Quinceaneros. Why is pride so important in Puerto Rican families? It helps to maintain the family structure. What saying is taught to Puerto Rican children? Accepto lo que dios me mande (I accept whatever God will offer me). What are three of the positive effects of including extended family members in a child’s education? extended support system, differing points of view, family members fluent in English & Spanish. What are two factors interfering with the success of Puerto Rican students in school? Unprepared teachers & lack of resources in Spanish in U.S. schools. What craze is popular with adolescents in Puerto Rico? Pokemon What is the most loved sport among Puerto Rican male youth? Baseball. What is a traditional dish popular with Puerto Rican children? Arroz con pollo. What is an easy treat for children that is made in the freezer? Limbers. What respiratory disease is reported highest among Puerto Rican children? Asthma. What percentage of Puerto Rican children in the U.S. live in poverty? 40%.

3 Family Structure and Economic Well-Being Study Questions What are two factors that contribute to high poverty rate in Puerto Rican families? What is a negative consequences for Puerto Rican children living in poverty?

4 Family Structure and Economic Well-Being Consequence of high divorce rates and increase in non-marital births among Puerto Ricans, result in children raised in female headed households 27% of Hispanic children in US live in mother- only families Strong relationship between family structure and child poverty 3 out of 4 Puerto Rican families living below poverty level are female headed

5 Family Structure and Economic Well-Being Factors that contribute to high poverty rate in families headed by a woman: low earnings capacity, inadequate financial support provided by nonresidential fathers, and limited welfare benefits provided by the state. Negative consequences for Puerto Rican children: risk of health problems, delayed intellectual development and poor school performance.

6 Traditions Study Questions What do Puerto Rican children place under their beds during the Feast of Epiphany’s Eve on Jan 6 th ? What is the tradition that commemorates going from girlhood to womanhood?

7 Holiday Traditions Santos Innocents – On Dec 28 th, Puerto Ricans celebrate la fiesta in commemoration of the soldiers who killed the 1 st born boys 0-2 from every family, fearing a new messiah. Children dress up as soldiers playing practical jokes on one another. Parrandas – Christmas caroling where families go to unsuspecting friends houses and serenade them with aguinaldos (christmas songs). Ano Nuevo – say goodbye to old year & welcome new year by eating twelve grapes at midnight. Brings prosperity.

8 Holiday Traditions cont. Throw bucket of water into street to rid home of bad things & prepare for arrival of good things. Misa de Gallo is a Misa de Aguinaldo (Catholic Mass) held at midnight on Christmas Eve. Children dress as angels & nativity characters during this religious service. Feast of Epiphany’s Eve - On eve of Jan 6 th children place water & grass under their beds for the Three Kings (wise men) camels & in return Three Kings bring presents & leave under children’s beds.

9 Other Traditional Events Weddings – Customary at Puerto Rican wedding reception to place a doll dressed like the bride at the tables with souvenirs attached to dress of doll, some people pin dollars to the dress for the couple. Quinceaneros – tradition that commemorates going from girlhood to womanhood. The Guayabera – traditional dress for males on the island. Dominoes – Traditionally played in bars & other public places by males in Puerto Rico. Azabache Bracelets – Newborn babies wear them to protect from the evil eye that is a result of excessive admiration or envious looks by others.

10 Values and Morals Study Questions Why is pride so important in Puerto Rican families? What saying is taught to Puerto Rican children?

11 Values and Morals Children are important in the Puerto Rican –American family: carry on traditions & culture; take care of their elderly parents. Children brought up to please father who traditionally tells stories passed through generations. Children taught to carry out cultural expectations: chores, respect, do things “a la buena” (the nice way), & cooking.

12 Values and Morals cont. Pride very important to Puerto Rican-American household. Pride created through collective effort of all family members, helps to maintain family structure. Children expected to maintain socially constructed gender roles. Puerto Rican-Americans proud of cultural celebrations. Family & friends come together for food, music & dancing. Children are a big part of festivities & are never excluded.

13 Values and Morals cont. Puerto Rican-American children still raised with traditional spiritual beliefs of culture. Catholic or Protestant as well as supernatural beliefs play a large role in children’s upbringing. “Accepto lo que dios me mande” (I accept whatever God will offer me) familiar saying and belief is taught to children. Believe forces beyond their control contribute to hardships Puerto Rican-American families feel American influence negatively effecting their children.

14 Education Study Questions What are three of the positive effects of including extended family members in a child's education? What are two factors interfering with the success of Puerto Rican students in school?

15 Education Issues  Bilingualism & Biculturalism -Attempting to learn new language & culture while also participating in traditional language & culture. -Controversy in Puerto Rico over which language to speak and how often: 1997 – Secretary of Education, Victor Fajardo’s: “Project to Create a Bilingual Citizen”.  Parent/Family & the School System -reaching out to untapped resource in nuclear & extended families of students (aunts, uncles, grandparents)

16 Education cont. Parent/Family & School System -lack of information in Spanish (lack of knowledge about school system & student progress. -lack of personal outreach by administrators. Students Feelings of Inadequacy/Alienation Unprepared Teachers -Unprepared to teach bicultural children and/or reach out to additional resources

17 Education cont. Solutions Interact w/nuclear family & extended family members to give students additional resources & support. Provide information in both English & Spanish. Meetings to update parents on student progress Educate teachers w/multicultural classes/conferences. Increase funding for tutoring & educational classes. “Help! They Don’t Speak English Kit for Primary Teachers”. Online Free copy

18 Games & Sports Study Questions? What craze is popular with adolescents in Puerto Rico? What is the most loved sport among Puerto Rican male youth?

19 Pokemon Fever Pokemon fever notable in Puerto Rico and U.S. Craze began as video game, then flooded collectible market. Pokemon cards and accessories so popular during 1999, lawmakers investigated effect on market penetration. Concern regarding fights between children in U.S. over Pokemon cards & accessories.

20 Swimming Extremely popular in Atlantic and Caribbean Puerto Rican communities. Youth and adolescence compete in swimming, diving, and surf sports. Both Island-based and U.S. Puerto Rican’s contribute to the U.S. world of water sports. Puerto Rican youth idolize and aspire to be like those who compete.

21 Baseball Most popular sport among Puerto Rican male youth. Of Puerto Rican descent, Reggie Jackson considered one of the best players in U.S. Other popular sports with Puerto Rican youth: Basketball, Boxing, Golf, Horse Racing & Tennis.

22 Other Recreational Activities During annual event, The Ko-Thi Dance Company presented “Bombale” (Bomba is a drum from Puerto Rico. Combination of rumba & mambo steel drums and the Puerto Rican “Bomba” In its 35 th season, the Ko-Thi Dance Company gave a tribute to Caribbean dance forms.

23 Food Study Questions What is a traditional dish popular with Puerto Rican children? What is an easy treat for children that is made in the freezer?

24 Food Many Puerto Rican families have fruit trees in their own backyards. Bananas, Plantains, & Coconuts are some fruits favored by Puerto Rican children. Guavas and Guayabes are also popular and are made into delicious jelly that children enjoy eating. Arroz con Pollo is a favorite chicken dish of Puerto Rican children. Polvo de Amor (love power) - Coconut mixed with sugar and cooked in a kettle until golden brown is a tasty but unhealthy snack children love. An easy snack for children to make is Limbers – freeze any juice in ice-cube trays to make this.

25 Food cont. Unfortunately, the foods just mentioned are becoming the old way of eating for most Puerto Ricans. Much of the food imported to Puerto Rico is from the U.S. Fast food has become very popular with adolescents in Puerto Rico.

26 Health Issues Study Questions? What Ethnicity is most prone to Asthma? Puerto Rican children between ages 6 months to 11 years. What percentage of Puerto Rican children in U.S. live in poverty? 40%

27 Asthma Asthma – complex disease associated with genetics, allergies (cockroaches & dust mites), mildews, molds & environment. 20 to 30% of Puerto Rican children living in inner cities have highest reported rate among Americans with asthma. Puerto Rican minority group bears disproportionate burden of all respiratory diseases.

28 Obesity Typical Puerto Rican adolescent diet is high in calories, complex carbohydrates, fats and sodium. Almost 70% of the food on the island of Puerto Rico is imported from U.S. & has become very Americanized. Fast food very popular. Population tendency towards high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes (3to % times higher than the general population), cancer, arthritis, gastrointestinal disorders and obesity.

29 Lead Poisoning 1997 report by Environmental Defense Fund (Washington-based environmental group), revealed 80% of Puerto Rican children of low income families in inner cities have unsafe amounts of lead in their blood. Sufficient to reduce IQ, harm hearing, ability to concentrate, & stunt physical growth. Puerto Rican children living in U.S. have serious health issues - Reason: 40% live in poverty

30 Bibliography Acuna, Elva. Personal interview. 5 February American Cultures for Children: Puerto Rican Heritage, Schlessinger Video Productions. (2002). Berrios,C. “Culturally Competent Mental Health Care for Puerto Rican Children.” Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing (2003 July-September). pp Coradasco, F. & Bucchioni, E. The Puerto Rican Community and Its Children on the Mainland. (1982). Cunningham, M. “The Influence of Parental Attitudes and Behaviors on Children’s Attitudes toward Gender and Household Labor in Early Adulthood.” Journal of Marriage and the Family (2002). vol.63, pp DeJeusu, J.L. ed. Growing up Puerto Rican. NewYork: Morrow, (1997). Inger, M. "Increasing the School Involvement of Hispanic Parents." ERIC/CUE Digest Number 80. (1992). 25 January Kummer, P.K. Puerto Rico. Mankato: Capstone, (1991). Lassiter, S.M. Cultures of Color in America: A Guide to Family, Religion and Health Westport, Connecticut, Green wood Press (1998). Lebron-Frazier, Yolanda. Personal Interview. 29 January "LULAC National Education Agenda: Challenge and Policy Recommendations " League of United Latin American Citizens. 25 January "Paige Outlines No Child Left behind Act's 'Ten Key Benefits for Parents of English Language Learners'". 2 December January Pariser, H.S. The Adventure Guide to Puerto Rico. Edison: Hunter (1994) Perez y Gonzalez M.E. Puerto Ricans in the United States Westport, Connecticut, Greenwood Press ( 2000). Pousada, A. "The Singularly Strange Story of the English Language in Puerto Rico". Milenio (1999), 3, January Martinez, Stephanie. Personal Interview. 2 February Source of the Help!Kit : "Welcome to Puerto Rico". 25 January


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