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Week 5: Journalism 2001 February 25, 2008. Find the misspellings…… 1. Bayfeild 2. Strawberrys 3. Both!

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Presentation on theme: "Week 5: Journalism 2001 February 25, 2008. Find the misspellings…… 1. Bayfeild 2. Strawberrys 3. Both!"— Presentation transcript:

1 Week 5: Journalism 2001 February 25, 2008

2 Find the misspellings…… 1. Bayfeild 2. Strawberrys 3. Both!

3 Review of last week’s news Hard News: Hard News: (murders, city council, government, etc.) –Major local stories: UMD scare –Major national/international stories –Major sports stories Soft News: Soft News: (retirements, school programs, human interest) –Local stories –National/international stories –Sports stories

4 Announcements Gerard Baker Reception Gerard Baker Reception –British journalist for The Times of London –Working in Washington, D.C. –What did you learn about British journalism? British journalismBritish journalism

5 Review of last week’s assignments Watch wordiness! Watch wordiness! –Avoid full name in lead unless prominent person –Attempted robbery –Were let out of school: classes dismissed Style errors Style errors –Datelines –Numerals: When starting sentence, spell out –Correct names –24-year-old: ages –Disc jockey, not disk jockey –States –Time: a.m., p.m.

6 A 24-year-old student is reportedly in stable condition after he was shot in his left arm during an attempted robbery around 1 a.m. at a Vineland radio station where he works as a disc jockey. An armed assailant shot a 24-year-old college student early this morning during an attempted robbery at a small radio station in Vineland, N.J. A Stockton State College student and radio station D.J. is undergoing surgery to remove a bullet in his left arm, after a man bearing a revolver entered WKQV-FM and demanded his wallet.

7 2,500 Farragut High School students were released from classes early Friday after gang fights throughout the building resulted in three cut and bruised students, while 20 other students were arrested for disorderly conduct. A scuffle in the lunchroom Friday at Farragut Career Academy High School resulted in 20 arrests, three injured students and an early release of school due to the several gang-related fistfights that escalated. Several gang-related fistfights broke out at Farragut Career Academy High School on Friday resulting in the arrests of 20 students. On Friday 20 Farragut Career Academy High School students were arrested after an outbreak of gang related fistfights occurred stemming from a scuffle in the lunchroom, leading to an early dismissal to ensure students’ safety.

8 Review: Writing a summary lead Usually a single sentence Usually a single sentence No more than 35 words No more than 35 words Bottom line: Bottom line: –Use a single sentence of no more than 35 words to summarize an event

9 Hard News 1 Story: Due next Monday, March 3 Work in teams to interview Duluth citizens Work in teams to interview Duluth citizens Each reporter writes own story Each reporter writes own story Interview 5-10 Duluthians Interview 5-10 Duluthians –Might not use all sources in story –List all sources, with contact info, at end of story Stories will be posted on class website: Stories will be posted on class website: –Last fall’s website: Fall Jour 2001 Website Fall Jour 2001 WebsiteFall Jour 2001 Website

10 Hard News 2 Story: Due Friday, March 14 Select a meeting to cover from story list Select a meeting to cover from story list –Duluth City Council: Tuesday, 2/26, 7 p.m. –Duluth School Board: Tuesday, 2/26, 6:30 p.m. –Schools Budget Meeting: Tuesday, 3/4, 5 p.m. –Superior Common Council: Tuesday, 3/4, 6:30 p.m. Duluth –St. Louis County Board: Tuesday, 3/11, 9:30 a.m. –Other: Arranged Length of story pitch (Due 2/20): three paragraphs, about 200 words Length of story pitch (Due 2/20): three paragraphs, about 200 words Include the 5 Ws and H: what makes this story newsworthy Include the 5 Ws and H: what makes this story newsworthy Complete article due: March 14 Complete article due: March 14

11 Hard News 2 Tips Any problems? Any problems? –City Council meeting on Tuesday, 2/26 –Where park? Where go? What time? How to read agenda? Background information? agenda Tips: Tips: –In text, review:  Writing the Meeting Story: An Inverted-Pyramid Story: p  Organizing an Inverted Pyramid: Guidelines to Follow: p –Just use said: he said, she said –Keep paragraphs short: no more than two sentences, three max –Story length: 8-10 paragraphs, words –Write strong summary lead of one sentence, 35 words or less –Need attribution from sources; just name OK for source list –Sit together at meeting! Ask for handouts! Take lots of notes! –Don’t be afraid to ask questions after the meeting –Review class lecture notes at: 

12 What I’ll be looking for (p ): Write a terse lead Write a terse lead Provide background Provide background Present news in order of descending importance Present news in order of descending importance Use quotations early and throughout Use quotations early and throughout Use transitions Use transitions Do not editorialize Do not editorialize Avoid “the end” Avoid “the end”

13

14 Statesman Guide to Writing

15 Chapter 22: Courts Federal Judicial System Federal Judicial System Federal Judicial System Federal Judicial System –Supreme Court –U.S. Court of Appeals –U.S. District Courts –U.S. Bankruptcy Court Minnesota Judicial System Minnesota Judicial System Minnesota Judicial System Minnesota Judicial System –Supreme Court –Court of Appeals –District Courts

16 Types of court cases Criminal Cases Criminal Cases –Enforcement of criminal statutes –Brought by state or federal government against a person for committing a crime such as murder, armed robbery Civil cases Civil cases –Legal disputes between individuals, businesses, state or local governments, government agencies –Commonly include suits for damages from auto accidents, breach of contract, libel

17 Criminal Cases Basic criminal process: Basic criminal process: –Indictment/information filed: Criminal charge Criminal chargeCriminal charge –Warrant issued for arrest –Arraignment: Criminal charge is read to accused –Preliminary hearing/Grand jury: Probable cause –Second arraignment: Plea entered  Plea bargaining, jury date set –Trial by judge or jury –Jury reaches verdict

18 Civil cases Basic civil process Basic civil process –Plaintiff files a complaint –Defendant served with a summons –Defendant files pleading –Depositions taken –Appearances before judge  Settlement often reached –Trial scheduled: Either jury or judge –Verdict

19 Checklist for covering courts Learn the judicial system Learn the judicial system Learn the record-keeping system Learn the record-keeping system Provide sufficient background for the reader Provide sufficient background for the reader Double-check facts Double-check facts Use complete names, addresses or occupations Use complete names, addresses or occupations –Johnson story example

20 Review of story examples BN engines run into coal train BN engines run into coal train Woman, 49, is accused of aiming gun at deputy Woman, 49, is accused of aiming gun at deputy Charities fight for funds Charities fight for funds Pollution forces Sheridan to replace shale with sand Pollution forces Sheridan to replace shale with sand Drive for museum tax dropped Drive for museum tax dropped Sawmill stories Sawmill stories

21 Chapter 15: Weather & Disasters Covering weather Covering weather –USA Today: Sets standard  Colorful, comprehensive –How does it affect the readers? –Explaining technical information –Weather forecasting services  National Weather Service  AccuWeather

22 Types of weather stories Forecasts Forecasts –State, local forecasts –Long-term Same as hard news stories Same as hard news stories –Select appropriate lead –Structure concise, easy-to-understand first sentence –Quotations from authorities near top of story –Tell readers what they want to know: how weather will affect them

23 Travel conditions, closings Travel conditions, closings –Road conditions –School closings Record-breaking weather Record-breaking weather –Storm records Unusual weather Unusual weather –Tornadoes, hurricanes, tsunamis Seasonal, year-end stories Seasonal, year-end stories –Go beyond statistics

24 Weather terms: AP Style Weather terms section Weather terms section –Comprehensive section based on National Weather Service 2004 Stylebook: A term often used incorrectly for seismic sea wave. Scientists call them tsunamis, a term that is not widely used and should be explained if used. 2005, 2006 Stylebook: Use tsunami, but explain the term.

25 Checklist for weather stories Develop sources with National Weather Service Develop sources with National Weather Service Keep in touch with the: Keep in touch with the: –State Patrol –State Department of Transportation –Local law enforcement agencies –Local agencies responsible for snow removal, storm cleanup –Institutions affected by weather: schools, utilities, airports, National Guard, hospitals, train stations, bus companies, taxi companies, Post Office Interview local residents caught in the weather Interview local residents caught in the weather

26 On-line weather sources “Ask the experts” page on USAToday.com “Ask the experts” page on USAToday.comUSAToday.com CNN.com CNN.com CNN.com National Weather Service: National Weather Service: AccuWeather: AccuWeather.com AccuWeather: AccuWeather.comAccuWeather.com Weather Channel: weather.com Weather Channel: weather.comweather.com UMD home page: UMD home page:

27 Weather story examples Tornado at coal mine Tornado at coal mine Flash flood in Buffalo Flash flood in Buffalo Blizzard stories Blizzard stories Snowplows hit the skids Snowplows hit the skids

28 Covering disasters Elements of disaster coverage Elements of disaster coverage –The first bulletins –Writethrus: Complete stories, update bulletins  1 st Lead-Writethru, 2 nd Lead-Writethru, etc. –Reporters use instinct: “nose for news” –Including essential information –Coordinating coverage –Getting the latest lead

29 Two problems for reporters A pitfall of instantaneous coverage A pitfall of instantaneous coverage –To beat competition, facts often not double checked Interviewing victims’ families Interviewing victims’ families –Research by Karen McCowan, reporter for The Arizona Republic  Many relatives didn’t mind being interviewed after a disaster

30 Covering September 11 First bulletins First bulletins –Radio, TV, Internet When did you learn the news? When did you learn the news? How 9-11 Changed the Evening News: How 9-11 Changed the Evening News: –http://www.journalism.org/node/1839

31 Journalism Case Studies Today: Today: Intruding on grief: Does the public really have a "need to know?" Go to: cs/invading-privacy/intruding-on-grief/ cs/invading-privacy/intruding-on-grief/ - Compiled by University of Indiana School of Journalism

32 Another wayward sign!

33 What’s misspelled? 1. Additional 2. Availible 3. Restrooms

34 Chapter 23: Sports Evolution of sports writing Evolution of sports writing –Sports pages consistent  Contest coverage, personality profiles, features, columns  Go beyond the game: Vikings scandals –Flowery prose: Grantland Rice, Nashville Daily News, 1901 –Stanley Woodward, New York Herald Tribune  Still cliches – strive for middle ground  WWII put sports into better perspective: 5Ws & H –1970s and 1980s: More balanced approach – Best sports writing: Includes statistics, essential ingredients (5Ws & H), more analytical

35 High School Sports Coverage Terry Henion, Omaha World-Herald Terry Henion, Omaha World-Herald –“Kids playing kids’ games” Reporters must keep stats Reporters must keep stats –No sports information directors Not really covering, more documenting Not really covering, more documenting Stringers: College students covering high school sports Stringers: College students covering high school sports Quotes from losing, winning coaches & players Quotes from losing, winning coaches & players

36 Reporting Sports Working with statistics Working with statistics –Box scores –Team statistics –Individual statistics –Beware of becoming “statistic junkie” –Review statistics for trends: play-by-play charts

37 Going beyond statistics Going beyond statistics –Watch coaches on sidelines, nervous parents in stands –Policies for post-game interviews  Cool-down time –Talk to coaches –Talk to players –Talk to trainers A showcase for good writing A showcase for good writing Beyond the game – contracts, courtrooms, boardrooms Beyond the game – contracts, courtrooms, boardrooms

38 Checklist for sportswriters Go with a summary lead if warranted, but more room to be creative. Go with a summary lead if warranted, but more room to be creative. Avoid chronological approaches Avoid chronological approaches Blend facts, turning points, quotations, statistics, analysis Blend facts, turning points, quotations, statistics, analysis Avoid cliches: cliffhangers, take it to ‘em Avoid cliches: cliffhangers, take it to ‘em Avoid “ridiculous” direct quotations: we whipped ‘em good Avoid “ridiculous” direct quotations: we whipped ‘em good Use vivid description when appropriate Use vivid description when appropriate Double-check spellings Double-check spellings Do your homework Do your homework

39 Online sports sources National Collegiate Athletic Association: National Collegiate Athletic Association: –www2.ncaa.org www2.ncaa.org National Basketball Association: National Basketball Association: National Football League: National Football League: Major League Baseball: Major League Baseball: ESPN: ESPN:

40 Sports Story Due: Monday, March 31 Story pitch due 2/20: No more than three paragraphs, or 200 words Story pitch due 2/20: No more than three paragraphs, or 200 words Go with classmates when interviewing after the game Go with classmates when interviewing after the game Contact Bob Nygaard, Sports Information Director Contact Bob Nygaard, Sports Information Director UMD sports schedules UMD sports schedules –Detailed information at: 

41 Out-of-class assignment due: 3/3 AP Stylebook Editing AP Stylebook Editing –Sports Section –Weather terms

42 Tonight’s assignment City Council Meeting City Council Meeting –We’re going to watch the Duluth City Council meeting from last March 19 –Complete an inverted pyramid story of no more than 300 words in class:  by end of class to –OK to use computer to take notes –Relax! All will receive 10 points  EXCEPT: Style errors will be deducted! –Who’s on the City Council:

43 Egradebook Doublecheck assignments correct in egradebook: Doublecheck assignments correct in egradebook: –http://www.d.umn.edu/egradebook

44 Portfolio Store academic information in your Electronic Portfolio. Each student has 100 mb of storage. Store academic information in your Electronic Portfolio. Each student has 100 mb of storage. Access Electronic Portfolio at: https://portfolio.umn.edu/portfolio/index.j sp Access Electronic Portfolio at: https://portfolio.umn.edu/portfolio/index.j sp https://portfolio.umn.edu/portfolio/index.j sp https://portfolio.umn.edu/portfolio/index.j sp


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