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Week 5: Journalism 2001 October 11, 2010. Find the misspellings…… 1. Bayfeild 2. Strawberrys 3. Both!

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Presentation on theme: "Week 5: Journalism 2001 October 11, 2010. Find the misspellings…… 1. Bayfeild 2. Strawberrys 3. Both!"— Presentation transcript:

1 Week 5: Journalism 2001 October 11, 2010

2 Find the misspellings…… 1. Bayfeild 2. Strawberrys 3. Both!

3 Review of last weeks news Hard News: Hard News: (murders, city council, government, etc.) –Major local stories –Major national/international stories –Major sports stories Soft News: Soft News: (retirements, school programs, human interest) –Local stories –National/international stories –Sports stories

4 Words Matter!

5 Review of last weeks assignments Watch wordiness! Watch wordiness! –Avoid full name in lead unless prominent person –Attempted robbery –Were let out of school: classes dismissed Style errors Style errors –Spelling! –Datelines –Numerals: When starting sentence, spell out –Correct names –24-year-old: ages –Disc jockey, not disk jockey –States –Time: a.m., p.m.

6 VINELAND, N.J. – A 24-year-old Stockton State College student and local disc jockey, Mark Dickson, has been reported in stable condition after being shot by a burglar at 1 a.m. during one of Dicksons shifts at WKQV. VINELAND, N.J. – A 24-year-old Stockton State College student and local disc jockey is in stable condition after being shot during an attempted robbery at 1 a.m. at WKQV.

7 VINELAND, N.J. – An attempted robbery led to a young man being shot at a radio station earlier today after being held at gunpoint and refusing to give up more than $2. VINELAND, N.J. – An attempted robbery led to a 24- year-old Stockton College disc jockey being shot at a radio station earlier today after being held at gunpoint and refusing to give up more than $2.

8 Vineland, N.J. – After hearing a knock on the door, a Stockton State College student was shot and robbed for not giving up his wallet while working at a small radio station around 1 a.m. VINELAND, N.J. – After hearing a knock on the door, a Stockton State College student disc jockey was shot for not giving up his wallet while working at a small radio station around 1 a.m. today.

9 CHICAGO – Twenty students of Farragut Career High School were arrested and charged with disorderly conduct Friday after several gang-related fights broke out sending three students to a local hospital. CHICAGO – Twenty students of Farragut Career High School were arrested and classes were canceled Friday after several gang-related fights broke out sending three students to a local hospital.

10 CHICAGO – Multiple gang-related fistfights broke out Friday at Farragut Academy High School, resulting in three students being admitted to the hospital and 20 students getting arrested, with classes being cancelled for the remainder of the day. CHICAGO – Multiple gang-related fistfights broke out Friday at Farragut Academy High School, resulting in three students being treated at the hospital and 20 students arrested, with classes cancelled for the remainder of the day.

11 Students at Farragut Career Academy High School were sent home early on Friday after several gang-related fistfights erupted, resulting in 20 arrests and 3 injuries.

12 Review: Writing a summary lead Usually a single sentence Usually a single sentence No more than 35 words No more than 35 words Bottom line: Bottom line: –Use a single sentence of no more than 35 words to summarize an event

13 Statesman Guide to Writing

14 Sports Story Pitch Due: Monday, October 4 Select a UMD or prep sporting event to cover Select a UMD or prep sporting event to cover Length of story pitch: no more than three paragraphs, about 200 words Length of story pitch: no more than three paragraphs, about 200 words Include the 5 Ws and H: what makes this story newsworthy Include the 5 Ws and H: what makes this story newsworthy Complete article due: November 8 Complete article due: November 8

15 How were the events this weekend?

16 Covering sports Compiling, crunching sport stats –Conduct solid research. –Take careful notes. –Use stats selectively. –Add charts, graphs or sidebars, if needed.

17 Three most common story types 1.Game stories 2.Feature stories Analysis Analysis Profiles Profiles 3.Columns

18 Game story checklist Final score Final score Teams names Teams names When and where When and where Key players and key plays Key players and key plays Quotes Quotes Strategies Strategies Key statistics Key statistics Injuries Injuries Both teams records Both teams records What the game means What the game means Other relevant factors Other relevant factors

19 Sophomore guard Kalin Lucas, the 2009 Big Ten Player of the Year, stops to sign autographs before practice at the Metrodome in Minneapolis on March 19. Michigan State has since advanced to the Final Four and will play the University of Connecticut on April 4.

20 Covering sports Advance sporting event checklist Significance of game Significance of game History History Key players Key players Records and recent performances Records and recent performances Quotes Quotes Strategies Strategies Injuries Injuries Other factors Other factors Whos favored Whos favored Time, place and ticket information Time, place and ticket information

21 Freshmen quarterback Jon Lynch led the Bulldogs' offense at spring practice Thursday afternoon at Malosky Stadium.

22 Sports style –Team name usually plural. –High school athletes are girls and boys. –Abbreviate league names. –Use figures for measurements. –Use numerals for scores and time.

23 Tim Crisp of Fitchburg, WI finishes the last few feet of the 2009 American Birkebeiner in Hayward, WI this Saturday.

24 High School Sports Coverage Reporters must keep stats Reporters must keep stats –No sports information directors Stringers: College students covering high school sports Stringers: College students covering high school sports Quotes from losing, Quotes from losing, winning coaches & players

25 Reporting Sports Working with statistics Working with statistics –Box scores –Team statistics –Individual statistics –Beware of becoming statistic junkie –Review statistics for trends: play-by-play charts

26 Going beyond statistics Going beyond statistics –Watch coaches on sidelines, nervous parents in stands –Policies for post-game interviews Cool-down time Cool-down time –Talk to coaches –Talk to players –Talk to trainers A showcase for good writing A showcase for good writing Beyond the game – contracts, courtrooms, boardrooms Beyond the game – contracts, courtrooms, boardrooms

27 Checklist for sportswriters Go with a summary lead if warranted, but more room to be creative. Go with a summary lead if warranted, but more room to be creative. Avoid chronological approaches Avoid chronological approaches Blend facts, turning points, quotations, statistics, analysis Blend facts, turning points, quotations, statistics, analysis Avoid cliches: cliffhangers, take it to em Avoid cliches: cliffhangers, take it to em Avoid ridiculous direct quotations: we whipped em good Avoid ridiculous direct quotations: we whipped em good Use vivid description when appropriate Use vivid description when appropriate Double-check spellings Double-check spellings Do your homework Do your homework

28 Online sports sources National Collegiate Athletic Association: National Collegiate Athletic Association: –www2.ncaa.org www2.ncaa.org National Basketball Association: National Basketball Association: National Football League: National Football League: Major League Baseball: Major League Baseball: ESPN: ESPN:

29 Lets edit textbook quiz

30 Readings from the textbook! Four crime briefs: p. 236 Four crime briefs: p. 236 Check-writer sets off clerks internal alarm: p. 237 Check-writer sets off clerks internal alarm: p. 237 Murderer caught in Texas 15 years after escape: p. 238 Murderer caught in Texas 15 years after escape: p. 238 Rampaging rooster attacks girl: p. 240 Rampaging rooster attacks girl: p. 240 The Michael Jackson Verdict: p. 242 The Michael Jackson Verdict: p. 242 Amazing finish in relay winds gold, saves Phelps: p. 250 Amazing finish in relay winds gold, saves Phelps: p. 250 Verr-ific!: p. 252 Verr-ific!: p. 252 Give me the sign: p. 254 Give me the sign: p. 254 Vermeil senses it was go time: p. 256 Vermeil senses it was go time: p. 256

31

32 Covering crime Crime writing style and structure Kicker Inverted-pyramid lead Chronology

33 Covering the crime beat –Get to know everyone. –Find what information is available. –Get familiar with police procedures. –Use a scanner.

34 Covering the crime beat –Be prepared for anything. –Think trends. –Convey the human drama. –Remember teachers, coaches, ministers and public officials are big news.

35 What you should withhold –Names of minors –Names of victims of sensitive crimes –Names of endangered victims –Labeling people as suspects –Stereotypes

36 Homicide or assault checklist Victims name Victims name Extent of injuries/cause of death Extent of injuries/cause of death Location Location Time Time Circumstances Circumstances Description of suspect Description of suspect Name and identification of anyone arrested Name and identification of anyone arrested Comments Comments Unusual factors Unusual factors

37 Theft story checklist Type, value of items taken Type, value of items taken Victim Victim Location Location Time Time Circumstances Circumstances Description of suspect Description of suspect Name and identification of anyone arrested Name and identification of anyone arrested Comments Comments Unusual factors Unusual factors

38 Covering Courts Federal Judicial System Federal Judicial System Federal Judicial System Federal Judicial System –Supreme Court –U.S. Court of Appeals –U.S. District Courts –U.S. Bankruptcy Court Minnesota Judicial System Minnesota Judicial System Minnesota Judicial System Minnesota Judicial System –Supreme Court –Court of Appeals –District Courts

39 Covering courts Most trials arent newsworthy, except: –Murder cases. –Celebrity trials. –Important legal rulings. –Human-interest stories.

40 Criminal, civil court procedures –Misdemeanors – minor offenses –Felonies – serious crimes –Civil suits – resolve disputes, recover right or obtain compensation

41 Whats a famous criminal case ultimately decided in civil court?

42 Types of court cases Criminal Cases Criminal Cases –Enforcement of criminal statutes –Brought by state or federal government against a person for committing a crime such as murder, armed robbery Civil cases Civil cases –Legal disputes between individuals, businesses, state or local governments, government agencies –Commonly include suits for damages from auto accidents, breach of contract, libel

43 Criminal Cases Basic criminal process: Basic criminal process: –Indictment/information filed: Criminal charge Criminal chargeCriminal charge –Warrant issued for arrest –Arraignment: Criminal charge is read to accused –Preliminary hearing/Grand jury: Probable cause –Second arraignment: Plea entered Plea bargaining, jury date set Plea bargaining, jury date set –Trial by judge or jury –Jury reaches verdict

44 Civil cases Basic civil process Basic civil process –Plaintiff files a complaint –Defendant served with a summons –Defendant files pleading –Depositions taken –Appearances before judge Settlement often reached Settlement often reached –Trial scheduled: Either jury or judge –Verdict

45 Checklist for covering courts Learn the judicial system Learn the judicial system Learn the record-keeping system Learn the record-keeping system Provide sufficient background for the reader Provide sufficient background for the reader Double-check facts Double-check facts Use complete names, addresses or occupations Use complete names, addresses or occupations –Johnson story example

46

47 By the Numbers Journalists often dread using math skills Journalists often dread using math skills Numbers can help illustrate a story, make comparisons Numbers can help illustrate a story, make comparisons

48 Math for journalists –Percentages –Mean & median –Polls & surveys –Use graphics Pie charts Pie charts Line charts Line charts Bar charts Bar charts Fast facts Fast facts Understand the figures that matter Idea file Simplify. Simplify. Use understandable values. Use understandable values. Round off. Round off. Put budget numbers into context. Put budget numbers into context. Be accurate. Be accurate.

49 Basic math skills Percentages: Percentages: –10 percent, 40 percent –Budget increase/decrease: (Year 2 – Year 1)/Year 1 (Year 2 – Year 1)/Year 1 –Percentage of a whole (subgroup/entire group) (subgroup/entire group) –Percent or percentage points (1 percent difference/5 percent base =.20 or a 20 percent increase) (1 percent difference/5 percent base =.20 or a 20 percent increase)

50 Math for journalists –Percentages Increases Increases Decreases Decreases Increases of 100 percent or more Increases of 100 percent or more Understand the figures that matter –Mean and median Mean is arithmetic average. Mean is arithmetic average. Median is the halfway point. Median is the halfway point.

51 Information charts and graphs –Pie chart Shows different parts that make up the whole. Shows different parts that make up the whole. –Line chart Measures changing quantities over time. Measures changing quantities over time. –Bar chart Compares two or more items. Compares two or more items. –Fast facts Highlights most important data. Highlights most important data.

52 Ask for help Journalists often have big egos! Journalists often have big egos! –OK to ask for help Where to turn online: Where to turn online: –Robert Niles Journalism Help: –Math test for journalists: –Looking for a calculator?

53 Working with polls & surveys –The source Was data collected by objective researchers? Was data collected by objective researchers? –The sample size The larger the sample, the more accurate the survey. The larger the sample, the more accurate the survey. –The questions Kill any poll that uses leading, biased questions. Kill any poll that uses leading, biased questions. –Other variables Is survey demographically representative? Is survey demographically representative? Is it current? Is it current?

54 Surveys Conducting a survey Conducting a survey –Formulating the questions –Usually closed-end question: yes or no, one of two choices –Open-ended questions: tough to tabulate –Testing the questions –Developing the sample Identifying respondents Identifying respondents Selecting a random sample Selecting a random sample Determining the sampling error Determining the sampling error

55 Gathering data Gathering data –Face-to-face interviews –Mailed questionnaires –Telephone interviews Analyzing the data Analyzing the data –Hand-tabulate –Computer programs Writing the story Writing the story –Dont overstate results in the lead –Must explain survey methodology

56 When are surveys used? Election campaigns Election campaigns –Harris poll –Media polls –Political party polls Local issues: Local issues: –Price of gasoline, price of beer Pew Research Center: Pew Research Center: –http://www.people-press.org

57 Survey rules and guidelines Analyze the data carefully Analyze the data carefully Carefully interpret statistics correctly Carefully interpret statistics correctly Lead with surveys most significant findings Lead with surveys most significant findings Strive to humanize the statistics Strive to humanize the statistics Organize the story to help readers Organize the story to help readers –Use bullets for key statistics Make comparisons among subgroups Make comparisons among subgroups –Gender, sex, age Consider using charts for statistics Consider using charts for statistics Dont forget to explain survey methodology Dont forget to explain survey methodology

58 Another wayward sign!

59 Out-of-Class Assignment: Due 10/18 From information provided from a Tempe Police Department activity log, write an inverted-pyramid news story based on all the information available. From information provided from a Tempe Police Department activity log, write an inverted-pyramid news story based on all the information available.

60 Assignment: Due tonight Enroll in the News University course, The Interview. Access the course at: Enroll in the News University course, The Interview. Access the course at: When you finish the course, send me a Course Report, which is the last item on the left hand column when you are in the course. Send the report to: When you finish the course, send me a Course Report, which is the last item on the left hand column when you are in the course. Send the report to: You must complete the course by Monday, October 11 at 11:59 p.m. You must complete the course by Monday, October 11 at 11:59 p.m. Happy interviewing! Happy interviewing!

61 Hard News 1 Story: Due Tonight! We will review the stories We will review the stories –Make corrections –Resubmit final story to me –Also turn in the printed copy of your story to me

62 In Class Assignment More AP Stylebook editing! More AP Stylebook editing!

63 Lets look for common errors Attribution Attribution –Quote…….., he said. –Just use said! Style mistakes Style mistakes No source list No source list Restating the question Restating the question Demographic information: Demographic information: –Age, hometown, occupation

64 Egradebook Doublecheck assignments correct in egradebook: Doublecheck assignments correct in egradebook: –http://www.d.umn.edu/egradebook

65 Portfolio Store academic information in your Electronic Portfolio. Each student has 100 mb of storage. Store academic information in your Electronic Portfolio. Each student has 100 mb of storage. Access Electronic Portfolio at: https://portfolio.umn.edu/portfolio/index.j sp Access Electronic Portfolio at: https://portfolio.umn.edu/portfolio/index.j sp https://portfolio.umn.edu/portfolio/index.j sp https://portfolio.umn.edu/portfolio/index.j sp


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