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Environmental Resources Unit A Natural Resources.

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Presentation on theme: "Environmental Resources Unit A Natural Resources."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Environmental Resources Unit A Natural Resources

3 Problem Area 5 Outdoor Recreation

4 Lesson Plan 7 All-Terrain Vehicles: Injury and Fatality Statistics and Characteristics of Safe Operation

5 #1. A 400cc ATV carrying the driver and an extra rider is operating on a steep slope and it turns over backward. Both the driver and extra rider die from head injuries. #1. A 400cc ATV carrying the driver and an extra rider is operating on a steep slope and it turns over backward. Both the driver and extra rider die from head injuries. What are three things that might have prevented the following incident… Possible Responses

6 #2 A 400cc ATV carrying only the 13 year old driver runs into a ditch in a harvested soybean field while looking for deer tracks. The ATV overturns leaving the youth with one broken arm and burns on his bare legs and feet. #2 A 400cc ATV carrying only the 13 year old driver runs into a ditch in a harvested soybean field while looking for deer tracks. The ATV overturns leaving the youth with one broken arm and burns on his bare legs and feet. What are three things that might have prevented the following incident… Possible Responses

7 Learning Objectives Define specific terms related to compiling ATV data and state those findings. Define specific terms related to compiling ATV data and state those findings. Describe common incidents that occur while youth and adolescents are operating ATVs. Describe common incidents that occur while youth and adolescents are operating ATVs. Give specific examples of injuries that occur to youth and adolescents while operating ATVs. Give specific examples of injuries that occur to youth and adolescents while operating ATVs.

8 Learning Objectives (cont.) Relate specific factors that contribute to injuries and fatalities among youth and adolescents operating ATV’s. Relate specific factors that contribute to injuries and fatalities among youth and adolescents operating ATV’s. Identify characteristics that would indicate the ability to safely operate an appropriately sized ATV. Identify characteristics that would indicate the ability to safely operate an appropriately sized ATV.

9 Terms All-Terrain Vehicle All-Terrain Vehicle Youth Youth Adolescent Adolescent Incident Incident Injury Injury Fatal Injury/Fatality Fatal Injury/Fatality Data Statistics Hazard Characteristics Personal Protective Equipment

10 Illinois Vehicle Code Definition All-Terrain Vehicle All-Terrain Vehicle –Any motorized off-highway device 50 inches or less in width, having a manufacturer’s dry weight of 900 pounds or less, traveling on 3 or more low-pressure tires, designed with a seat or saddle for operator use, and handlebars or steering wheel of steering control. DOES NOT INCLUDE LAWN MOWERS or GOLF CARTS! or GOLF CARTS!

11 Other Definitions Youth – for the purpose of this presentation, the term youth applies to those between the ages of 9 years and15 years. Youth – for the purpose of this presentation, the term youth applies to those between the ages of 9 years and15 years. Adolescent – for the purpose of this presentation, the term adolescent applies to those between the ages of 16 years and 19 years. Adolescent – for the purpose of this presentation, the term adolescent applies to those between the ages of 16 years and 19 years.

12 Other Definitions (cont.) Incident – unanticipated, sudden event that may cause an undesired outcome such as property damage, bodily injury, or death. Incident – unanticipated, sudden event that may cause an undesired outcome such as property damage, bodily injury, or death. The term implies that many factors had to happen together in order for the event to occur. The term also implies that nearly all incidents are preventable. The term implies that many factors had to happen together in order for the event to occur. The term also implies that nearly all incidents are preventable.

13 Other Definitions (cont.) The term incident is used by many involved in safety and health in preference to the term accident. The term incident is used by many involved in safety and health in preference to the term accident. accident Fatal Injury/Fatality – an injury that causes death/a single instance of death. Fatal Injury/Fatality – an injury that causes death/a single instance of death.

14 Other Definitions (cont.) Injury – the physical damage to body tissue resulting from the contact of a person and anything that can cause that damage. Injury – the physical damage to body tissue resulting from the contact of a person and anything that can cause that damage. sharp objects sharp objects electrical shock electrical shock HOTITEMSHOTITEMSHOTITEMSHOTITEMS cold temperatures cold temperatures

15 Other Definitions (cont.) Hazard – a condition or changing set of circumstances that presents a potential for injury or property damage. The potential or inherent characteristics of an activity or condition which can produce unwanted and harmful consequences. Hazard – a condition or changing set of circumstances that presents a potential for injury or property damage. The potential or inherent characteristics of an activity or condition which can produce unwanted and harmful consequences. Did you see a hazard on your way to school today?

16 Other Definitions (cont.) Data – any information collected for a specific purpose. This information can be collected in the form of interviews, surveys, reviews of newspaper clippings, or reviews of death certificates. Data – any information collected for a specific purpose. This information can be collected in the form of interviews, surveys, reviews of newspaper clippings, or reviews of death certificates. Clippings Surveys IntervIewsIntervIews

17 Other Definitions (cont.) Statistic – a number that describes some characteristic of data that has been collected. Total number of injuries and percentages of injuries are two examples of statistics. Statistic – a number that describes some characteristic of data that has been collected. Total number of injuries and percentages of injuries are two examples of statistics. % # 3434

18 Selected National Statistics Youth under 16 represented 34% of all ATV- related emergency room visits. Youth under 16 represented 34% of all ATV- related emergency room visits. ~70% of fatal injuries to youth and adolescents under 19 years involved the head and neck. ~70% of fatal injuries to youth and adolescents under 19 years involved the head and neck. Common non-fatal injuries include broken upper and lower extremities, head injuries, bruises, and scrapes. Common non-fatal injuries include broken upper and lower extremities, head injuries, bruises, and scrapes.

19 Selected National Statistics (cont.) Common incidents include rollover crashes, collisions with stationary objects, and falling off the vehicle. Common incidents include rollover crashes, collisions with stationary objects, and falling off the vehicle. A national survey indicated that only 36% of riders reported wearing a helmet all the time when operating and ATV. A national survey indicated that only 36% of riders reported wearing a helmet all the time when operating and ATV. Under 16 year old operators are four times more likely than those over 16 to experience an injury. Under 16 year old operators are four times more likely than those over 16 to experience an injury.

20 Incident Contributing Factors- Youth Specific Most youth do not possess: Most youth do not possess: –Physical size, strength, coordination and motor skills to operate the size ATV they are riding –The cognitive capacity to look for and react to potential hazards –Judgment not to act impulsively –Long attention spans and therefore are easily distracted

21 Incident Contributing Factors- Adolescent Specific Many adolescents may possess: Many adolescents may possess: –Physical size, strength, coordination, and motor skills to operate an ATV, but the ATV is too large. –Cognitive capacity to look for/react to potential hazards, but ride too fast and lack experience. –Good judgment, but this can be impaired by peer pressure, being self-absorbed, and being distracted by other thoughts and upcoming activities (sporting events, dates, etc.)

22 Operator Characteristics Needed for Safe Operation

23 Characteristics Characteristics in this presentation refer to distinct traits, features, or qualities that are found with those that operate ATVs safely. Characteristics in this presentation refer to distinct traits, features, or qualities that are found with those that operate ATVs safely. Absence of characteristics have been found to contribute to injury and fatality incidents, making them important to consider when making the decision to ride or not ride an ATV. Absence of characteristics have been found to contribute to injury and fatality incidents, making them important to consider when making the decision to ride or not ride an ATV.

24 Characteristics (cont.) Training program - Has the person participated in a training program? This information on training can be obtain from an ATV dealer. Can the operator perform a pre-ride inspection on the ATV they will be operating? Training program - Has the person participated in a training program? This information on training can be obtain from an ATV dealer. Can the operator perform a pre-ride inspection on the ATV they will be operating? Maturity – Has the operator exhibited good decision making skills in other areas? Is the operator routinely considerate of others? Timely? Overly impulsive? Usually follows directions? Maturity – Has the operator exhibited good decision making skills in other areas? Is the operator routinely considerate of others? Timely? Overly impulsive? Usually follows directions?

25 Characteristics (cont.) Physical Size – Physical Size – –When the operator stands on the foot-pegs, there should be inches of clearance between the seat and crotch. –When the operator is seated, the leg from the hip to the knee should be approximately horizontal. –When seated in a normal position, the reach to the handlebars should include a bent elbow, not straight out.

26 Age Recommendations by Model Size ATV Model SizeMinimum AgeWeight Capacity Under 70cc6 yrs and older70 Lbs cc12 yrs and older250 Lbs over 90cc16 yrs and older250 Lbs 150 cc & over16 yrs and older300 Lbs * It is important to note that in recent years many people advocate that no one under the age of 16 should be allowed to ride an ATV. Based on the information in this presentation, why would that be true? * It is important to note that in recent years many people advocate that no one under the age of 16 should be allowed to ride an ATV. Based on the information in this presentation, why would that be true?

27 Characteristics (cont.) Physical Strength Physical Strength –Once properly fitted to the ATV, does the operator have the strength needed to alternate body positions for turning and to grip the handle-bars for turning and over rough terrain?

28 Characteristics (cont.) Coordination and Motor Skills Coordination and Motor Skills –Has the operator successfully performed necessary skills under supervision? Turning? Uphill? Downhill? Traversing slopes? Under various environmental and traffic conditions?

29 Personal Protective Equipment DOT-, Snell, or ANSI-approved helmet DOT-, Snell, or ANSI-approved helmet –Bicycle helmets are not acceptable! Helmet should contain Dept. of Transportation label, Snell Memorial Foundation Label, or ASNI Z90.1 label. Should be replaced following single incident. Goggles/Glasses Goggles/Glasses –Regular glasses or sunglasses are not acceptable! Glasses should have VESC8 (V-8) or Z87.1 in one corner. They should also be ventilated to prevent fogging of goggles. There should be a brow bar and side shield.

30 ANSI Z87 marking

31 Glasses come in various styles and also colors such as clear, smoke, and yellow. Glasses

32 Approved helmet carries the DOT letters on rear of helmet. No DOT letters on rear of helmet. Suitable for bicycle but not ATV. RIGHT WRONG

33 PPE (cont.) Gloves Gloves –reduce vibration, padded over knuckles good. Over-the-ankle boots with low heel Over-the-ankle boots with low heel –Prevent slipping off foot-rests, if laced, tie short Long-sleeve shirt or jacket Long-sleeve shirt or jacket Long pants Long pants –Both sleeves and pants provide protection from scratches and pokes, close-fitting not loose

34 Summary Youth have 34% of all ATV related emergency room visits. Youth have 34% of all ATV related emergency room visits. Nearly ¾ of all fatal injuries to those under 19 are to the head and neck. Nearly ¾ of all fatal injuries to those under 19 are to the head and neck. Survey responses indicate only 36% of all ATV riders routinely wear an ATV helmet. Survey responses indicate only 36% of all ATV riders routinely wear an ATV helmet.

35 Summary (cont.) Contributing factors to incidents involving youth include: Contributing factors to incidents involving youth include: – lack of size and strength –inability to recognize hazards –short attention spans.

36 Summary (cont.) Contributing factors to incidents involving adolescents include: Contributing factors to incidents involving adolescents include: – riding ATV too large for their capabilities –ride too fast and lacking experience –being susceptible to peer pressure –attention distracted by other thoughts not related to current activity.

37 Summary (cont.) Most fatalities occur Most fatalities occur – on non-farm locations –to the operator, between 9-14 yrs of age –to males –during the day. More fatalities occur: More fatalities occur: –during the months of June and August than other months.

38 Summary (cont.) Most injuries occur: Most injuries occur: – on non-farm locations –to the operator, between yrs of age –to males –during the day. More injuries occur: More injuries occur: –during the months of June and August than other months.

39 Summary (cont.) Characteristics that contribute to the occurrence of injury and fatality incidents include: Characteristics that contribute to the occurrence of injury and fatality incidents include: –not participating in a training program –lack of overall maturity in decision making –lack of physical size and strength –carrying extra riders –not wearing proper PPE, especially a DOT approved helmet.

40 Take a Side Trip Learn more about ATV Injuries/Fatalities… Learn more about ATV Injuries/Fatalities… –What months are more people injured/killed? –Are males or females injured/killed more? –What age suffers more injuries/fatalities? –Are more injured/killed during the day? –What counties have the most injuries/fatalities? –Where do most ATV incidents occur? Skip the Trip Let’s Go

41 References ATV Safety Institute ATV Safety Institute National Children’s Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety National Children’s Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety 4-H Community ATV Safety Program 4-H Community ATV Safety Program

42 References Stedman’s Medical Dictionary (26 th Ed), Williams & Watkins Stedman’s Medical Dictionary (26 th Ed), Williams & Watkins Safety and Health for Production Agriculture, Dennis Murphy, ASAE Safety and Health for Production Agriculture, Dennis Murphy, ASAE Occupational Health, Barry Levy & David Wegman, Lippencott Williams & Wilkins Occupational Health, Barry Levy & David Wegman, Lippencott Williams & Wilkins UI Extension Ag. Safety and Health website UI Extension Ag. Safety and Health website

43 Robert (Chip) Petrea, PhD Extension Specialist – Ag. Safety and Health Dept. of Ag. and Bio Engineering, UIUC 304e Ag. Engineering Sciences 1304 West Pennsylvania Urbana, IL FAX Questions or Comments

44 END OF PRESENTATION Click Here to Return to Presentation

45 Potential Responses 1.The extra-rider should not have been there. 2.They should have both been wearing approved helmets. 3.The driver should have not attempted to climb the slope due to the extra weight of the rider. Return to Presentation

46 Potential Responses 1.A 400cc ATV is most likely too big for the 13 year old. 2.He was paying attention to deer tracks and not looking where he was going. 3.He should have been wearing long pants and leather boots. Return to Presentation

47 Accidents Accidents are usually perceived that nothing could have been done to prevent them from occurring. This might be true in some extreme examples. However, trying to prevent injuries and fatalities requires looking at root causes and trying to eliminate them or reduce their frequency. Return to Presentation

48 Illinois ATV Related Injuries/Fatalities Statistics

49 Data All data compiled is from press clippings provided by the Illinois Press Association. Based on research in other states, the use of press clippings is estimated to provide between 60-80% of the actual number of incidents that occurred in Illinois in the years covered. Total Fatalities/Injuries – 409 Total Injuries – 282 Total Fatalities - 127

50 Fatalities - Age Fatality Total=127

51 Injuries/Fatalities - Age Injury/Fatality Total=409

52 Injuries/Fatalities - County Location Stephenson (6) Jackson (6) Livingston (6) Edgar (6) Jasper (6) Saline (6) Cook (5) Grundy (5) Henry (5) Kendall (5) Union (5) Fayette (5) Lawrence (4) Saint Clair (4) Wabash (4) Wayne (4) Ogle (19) White (14) Clay (13) Will (12) Kane (11) Franklin (11) Perry (11) Pike (10) Jo Daviess (10) Montgomery (8) Adams (8) Clinton (8) Kankakee (8) LaSalle (7) Effingham (7) Iroquois (7) Marion (4) Edwards (4) Lake (4) Warren (4) Clark (4) Peoria (4) Whiteside (4) Hancock (2) Crawford (2) Cumberland (2) Macoupin (2) Tazewell (2) Winnebago (2) Sangamon (2) Hancock (2)

53 Fatalities - County Location Kane9 Kane9 Will5 Will5 Cook4 Cook4 Franklin4 Franklin4 Kendall 4 Kendall 4 Pike4 Pike4 Kankakee3 Kankakee3 Effingham3 Effingham3 Ogle3 Ogle3 Union 3 Union 3 Cumberland3 Cumberland Adams2 Iroquois2 JoDaviess2 Kane 2 Livingston2 Montgomery2 Randolph2 Carroll2 White2 Clark 2

54 Injuries/Fatalities By Sex Category Injury/Fatality Total=409

55 Fatalities By Sex Category (127) 2003

56 Injuries/Fatalities - Farm Vs. Non-Farm Application Injury/Fatality Total=409

57 Injuries Vs. Fatalities Injuries Vs. Fatalities Injury/Fatality Total=409

58 Fatality - Location Fatality Total=127

59 Injury/Fatality - Occurred To

60 Fatalities - Occurred To

61 Injuries/Fatalities - Day Vs. Night

62 Fatalities - Day Vs. Night

63 Injuries/Fatalities - Day Vs. Night Injury/Fatality Total=409

64 Fatalities - Day Vs. Night Fatality Total=127

65 Injuries/Fatalities - Year

66 Injuries - Year

67 Fatalities - Year

68 Injuries/Fatalities - Month

69 Fatalities - Month

70 Injuries - Month Return to Presentation


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